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Old 11-03-2019, 14:52   #61
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

Choice of dinghy is as personal, and as controversial (at least here on CF) as anchoring technique. For my boat, and the way I cruise, the portabote has proven itself to be the best solution. It ticks most of the boxes.

P.S. no moralizing or denigration intended or needed. There is no One Choice that is Best for everyone. Different limitations, different needs and priorities. Know thyself.
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Old 11-03-2019, 14:59   #62
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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Originally Posted by Bigmarv View Post
Poor straw man, I think. We aren't going to work, we are going out into quiet places and/or the poor third world. If shiny topsides are your thing, and you put your priorities where you do, fine, but in big parts of the world I think they're wrong priorities. Not just for environmental or health reasons, not just because speeding around is at odds with the feel of cruising, but because there are downsides that become very real. Outboard theft, damage to tubes (seals!), entire boat theft, vandalism, all that. Sure occasionally you might not anchor as far away if you have to row, but that's often a small price for never carrying a lock, never getting robbed, never stripping down a carb, not worrying about your kids hitting somebody with a prop, etc etc etc.

Well, I never said that good rowing hard dinghies don't have their attractions.


I have a pretty rowing skiff at my lake house which I love to row around the lake.


But from your post I get the impression that you haven't done much long-term or long-distance cruising -- am I right? Because what you need to do with the dinghy on a long-distance cruise IS work. There are very serious logistics involved in a long distance cruise, literally tons of supplies and equipment, and a lot of transport of people -- a lot of banal practical transport and sometimes really unavoidably over significant distances and sometimes against strong wind and head seas. I can't recall a single long distance cruiser other than the extreme spartan Pardeys, or our gadfly Sean, who would put up with a rowing dinghy. Some conditions where we need to use the dinghy would be actually dangerous without a reliable outboard. If you can manage it, more power to you (and photos, or it didn't happen ), but DON'T ask if the rest of us are "just soft", or ignorant. We are not.
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Old 11-03-2019, 15:02   #63
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
Choice of dinghy is as personal, and as controversial (at least here on CF) as anchoring technique. For my boat, and the way I cruise, the portabote has proven itself to be the best solution. It ticks most of the boxes.

P.S. no moralizing or denigration intended or needed. There is no One Choice that is Best for everyone. Different limitations, different needs and priorities. Know thyself.

Portabote is the most practically useful, and yet rowable dinghy, I know about. Obviously a matter of taste (and they are not mine), but objectively Portabotes have great advantages over classical hard dinghies, as a yacht tender, and yet unlike an unflatable, you can actually row them.
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Old 11-03-2019, 15:14   #64
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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Well, I never said that good rowing hard dinghies don't have their attractions.


I have a pretty rowing skiff at my lake house which I love to row around the lake.


But from your post I get the impression that you haven't done much long-term or long-distance cruising -- am I right? Because what you need to do with the dinghy on a long-distance cruise IS work. There are very serious logistics involved in a long distance cruise, literally tons of supplies and equipment, and a lot of transport of people -- a lot of banal practical transport and sometimes really unavoidably over significant distances and sometimes against strong wind and head seas. I can't recall a single long distance cruiser other than the extreme spartan Pardeys, or our gadfly Sean, who would put up with a rowing dinghy. Some conditions where we need to use the dinghy would be actually dangerous without a reliable outboard. If you can manage it, more power to you (and photos, or it didn't happen ), but DON'T ask if the rest of us are "just soft", or ignorant. We are not.
no, you're wrong, i've done plenty. if you can't think of anybody outside ones you've read about it's because you haven't been far perhaps?

anyway, you'll find them in all sorts of places on all sorts of self-sufficient boats. seen them in the pacific, in asia, in africa. sure with so many americans in the caribbean less so, but even there. also, i've sailed long distances with 2 tenders - one inflatable, one hard. used the hard presumptively most of the time for the reasons noted. had much more freedom than those who had to lock, pay a dinghy guard, or can't lift their boat over coral, rocks etc.

it's a big world out there. rock up to a few beaches in trinidad or tanzania with your mission critical shiny rib and yamaha and go for a walk around town. however far you motored to get in will be a refreshing row in your rib, or swim if the boat is gone too.
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Old 11-03-2019, 15:39   #65
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
Portabote is the most practically useful, and yet rowable dinghy, I know about. Obviously a matter of taste (and they are not mine), but objectively Portabotes have great advantages over classical hard dinghies, as a yacht tender, and yet unlike an unflatable, you can actually row them.
I agree .

BTW, there are definite downsides to a portabote, which Iím happy to share. But thatís better done in the other thread.

And to swing this back to the thread, it only requires a small outboard to get a PB moving well. This is partly why I can manage the outboard manually, with no need for additional hoists, much like I manage the portabote manually. No need to rig bridles or halyards or other tackle to launch or haul in the bote or the outboard.

But as with everything, my solution is not necessarily the best solution for everyone. Different motherships, different (larger) outboards, different fitness levels, different needs. I say do what works best for you.
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Old 11-03-2019, 16:29   #66
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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i've sailed long distances with 2 tenders - one inflatable, one hard. used the hard presumptively most of the time for the reasons noted
Hmm... As I read this,, it appears that you too had an inflatable to do the kind of chores that DH was mentioning when it was needed. And to me, this kinda means that if one is limited (by size, weight or other immutable factors) to a single dinghy, the inflatable is the one that is most necessary for a long term cruiser.

I too enjoy rowing in a boat that rows effectively. But as a long time cruiser, I find the large inflatable, preferably a RIB with an outboard engine, to be a great deal more useful than a typical rowing dink. In our now 32+ years aboard, we had one dink stolen. We only lock it very occasionally, have never paid a "dinghy watcher",and mostly leave it in the water overnight. Don't have davits (I find them truly distasteful on the stern of an otherwise pretty boat), and yet my wife and I manage the RIB ashore and afloat on our own (at ages 79 and 81 respectively). Over the years we've carried a lot of stores, gear, fuel, water, engines,, stoves, chain, anchors, and other cruising essentials. We've also carried pigs, copra, dried/smoked sea cucumbers, yangona, firewood, and a large assortment of villagers from a number of nations. To us, this is a real part of the cruising life, and I don't think we could have done much of that with just a small rowing dink. Oh, then there are the times that we have come to the aid of other yachts, helping them off the putty when aground or acting as a tug to move them when they were disabled or carrying out ground tackle in harsh conditions. And don't forget the diving trips to distant reefs... we used to do that a lot! And the time we went 5 miles up a river in New Caledonia to get to a post office when some emergency faxes had to be sent.

Yes, a Whitehall rowing boat or such would be a wonderful toy to have, or even a nicely shaped dory, but until I have a cruising boat large enough to carry that boat in addition to our RIB, it will have to remain a fond thought.

Jim

PS: I just remembered... we did have one other dink stolen, years before setting out long term. It was a 9 foot fiberglass rowing dinghy...
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Old 11-03-2019, 16:31   #67
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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The tremendous difference is astonishing, makes one wonder how a RIB can plane.
I guess from excess HP.
It is a quandry. I have decided it's not the bottom shape of the RIB. They have a short waterline, but beamy. Maybe that's it. A 10ft inflatable has probably what.... a 6 ft waterline or less? (most RIBs are a V like many boats) Many small hard dinks have a nearly flat bottom which is worse. I think it's more the bad oar angle to the water from the tubes, short oars, short waterline, lightweight and wind effect. Beamy too. A RIB is a bit like a leaf on the water!
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Old 11-03-2019, 17:01   #68
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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It's surprising people find the smallest outboards hard to handle. Even in rough conditions it has never occurred to me that people would need cranes etc for them. A 15 is different, but a 2 or 3.5 I really don't get it. They are very light and can be held in one hand easily by a moderately fit adult. Is it a reflection of the age and fitness of the average cruiser? Perhaps that explains why so many gravitate away from hard dinghies.

Either way, it's a pretty sad picture. A hard tender with oars means better health, lower impact, less noise, no engine maintenance, not locking things up on shore, not having it stolen even if you do, not having to raise it each night, etc etc. Unless one truly cannot be stowed (which is rare because the smallest boats often have hard tenders and remind us it can be done) what is the reason for avoiding them - softness?

Hell no!!!



It's 'cuz I'm bloody 73.


There are things I simply can't do anymore. I wish I still could.



Just you wait, you young'un!!!



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Old 11-03-2019, 17:37   #69
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

I'm with Stu on this one - both posts.


I installed a crane from Ocean Marine Systems after about ten years of manhandling the OB into and onto the dinghy, and then back to the boat. I'm a moderately fit 70 yr old, and it seemed inevitable to me that I was going to end up in the ocean at some point doing the transfer, even from a sugar scoop rear. The necessary dexterity, balance and strength all seem to be slowly deserting me as I age.

My main halyard is not available with in mast furling, and the bimini structure makes hoisting with the boom/block awkward in any case.

On a calm day, the transfer is an easy one person job with the crane. And there is no standing in the dinghy necessary in rougher water except for getting in and out of it. And now I'm thinking about a more powerful (and heavier) OB because I can !
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Old 11-03-2019, 17:54   #70
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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Hell no!!!



It's 'cuz I'm bloody 73.


There are things I simply can't do anymore. I wish I still could.



Just you wait, you young'un!!!



I hear ya brother Stu. My outboard still weighs 74 lbs and I still get it up over the rail and on and off the RIB but those days are coming to a close. I used to hand over hand the anchor chain now itís two hand pull. And I ainít 70 yet. Oh dandy.
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Old 11-03-2019, 18:25   #71
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

Iím not nearly as old or spry as Mr Jackson. So I bought a Canadian Product that is absolutely fantastic for getting the outboard on board. Can be done in rough-ish water by one person, without the outboard swinging all over and chipping the gel coat. Swing-lift.com. No financial ties just an amazed happy customer
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Old 11-03-2019, 18:41   #72
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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Originally Posted by Tetepare View Post
I hear ya brother Stu. My outboard still weighs 74 lbs and I still get it up over the rail and on and off the RIB but those days are coming to a close. I used to hand over hand the anchor chain now itís two hand pull. And I ainít 70 yet. Oh dandy.
Youíre a better man than Iíll ever be. Thereís no way Iíd be able to life 74# from my dinghy without seriously tempting Neptuneís wrath. And Iím still a ďyoungíunĒ (according to Stu anyway ).
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Old 11-03-2019, 18:52   #73
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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Iím not nearly as old or spry as Mr Jackson. So I bought a Canadian Product that is absolutely fantastic for getting the outboard on board. Can be done in rough-ish water by one person, without the outboard swinging all over and chipping the gel coat. Swing-lift.com. No financial ties just an amazed happy customer
There has to be a way this product could double as a boarding ladder. I canít fathom why it doesnít already?
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Old 11-03-2019, 19:14   #74
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Re: getting the outboard on the dinghy

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There has to be a way this product could double as a boarding ladder. I canít fathom why it doesnít already?
Or just the opposite - a boarding ladder could be used in place of this product.
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Old 11-03-2019, 19:59   #75
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getting the outboard on the dinghy

At 70 I no longer feel the need to justify myself for using labor saving or safety devices. My topsides are quite high, about 4 feet, and climbing up a 4 step boarding ladder carrying a 40 lb outboard in one hand while holding onto the ladder with the other hand is still possible but not desirable. I could blame it on taking the strain off my wife from helping to hauling the motor up or down but truth be told I just find it easier and safer. Anyone who thinks manhandling their motor makes them a better man than I is welcome to their opinion.
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