Cruisers Forum
 


Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 28-08-2020, 09:07   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Nomad
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 128
Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

A few nights ago, I was hit by a microburst (or something very like) while anchored in Newport, RI - 50+kts for 5-10 minutes or so with no warning. Luckily, most of the boats held (including me, phew), and those that dragged were able to motor up against the wind until it abated, and then reset. However, I had my dinghy on a leash on the stern for easy shore access, since no serious weather was predicted at the time. The poor dink was flipped, drowning the outboard, then pinned up against the hull and chafed pretty good, causing a slow leak that I'm yet to identify.

All this to say, I find myself in a situation where insurance may be about to buy me a new dinghy & outboard. Still waiting to hear back on coverage details, but I may have an opportunity to at least have the new kit subsidized by insurance, if not outright paid for. So my question is: What do people like/dislike or think is important when selecting the dinghy and/or outboard?

My current dinghy is a little 8-ft RIB. It fits on my davits, so I'm hesitant to look at anything bigger, even though that would be nice for when I have guests and need to transport 4+ people. The current outboard is a Yamaha 2.5 HP. It gets me on plane when I'm alone in the dinghy, but not with 2 or more people on board, so I'd love a bit more power. However, I'm curious about the weight trade-off there. Since I single-hand most of the time, I definitely want to be able to manhandle the outboard on and off by myself. Plus, I don't want something that will unbalance my small dinghy.

Also, if anyone has thoughts specifically on electric outboards. I'm curious about that, since my solar capacity means I could likely keep it charged up mostly for free, and a silent outboard would be lovely. But do they last? Have enough power to get me on plane? Hold enough charge for longer trips? I know almost nothing about them.

Anyway, curious to hear others' thoughts on the matter. Thanks!
__________________
Time and tide wait for none
JebLostInSpace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 10:22   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: ABC's
Boat: Prout Snowgoose 35
Posts: 1,759
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Shouldn't the Torqeedo 1003 be able the equivalent of a 2.5-3hp engine? Everyone I've met with them has absolutely loved them, until they went wrong.

For any more power than that, you are looking separate batteries, and motor combos, and their batteries are crazy expensive.

P.S, had the same happen to me in Taomina, Sicily. Less than 10knts of wind, predicted to be even lighter for night. All of a sudden 45knt winds. The dinghy flew in the air and spun around on its painter. I can't see it happening with my Aluminium floor dinghy and 26kg 8hp outboard though.
mikedefieslife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 10:46   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Nomad
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 128
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Do you have any idea how long it took for the torqeedo's to "go wrong" from those you've met? Longevity is definitely one of my big concerns with them, since the upfront cost is a fair bit higher than the gas engines. Once they "went wrong" I'm assuming the repairs were more difficult/expensive? Or maybe they were just garbage at that point?
__________________
Time and tide wait for none
JebLostInSpace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 11:53   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
tkeithlu's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Carrabelle, Florida
Boat: Fiberglas shattering 44' steel trawler
Posts: 3,195
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Thunder storm fronts have lots of straight-line cells inside them - that's why airliners no longer land in thunderstorms. If you want to see them, try WeatherTap.com; that radar displays each cell with its speed, meso (tendency to curl into a tornado), water column, and the like. They can have 90 MPH winds in them, and do just what you experienced. In the meantime, going close-hauled into a thunderstorm is not recommended.

Consider a 4 HP Tohatsu four stroke. Same as a Nissan, but for less, and they've got the weight down close to the two-strokes. Reliable.

Small but real RIB recommended- anything that folds is not going to plane as well.
__________________
Never let anything mechanical know that you are in a hurry.
tkeithlu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 12:06   #5
Registered User
 
Jammer's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Minnesota
Boat: Hunter 26
Posts: 2,130
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by JebLostInSpace View Post
Do you have any idea how long it took for the torqeedo's to "go wrong" from those you've met? Longevity is definitely one of my big concerns with them, since the upfront cost is a fair bit higher than the gas engines. Once they "went wrong" I'm assuming the repairs were more difficult/expensive? Or maybe they were just garbage at that point?

There have been a number of specific criticisms of the Torqueedo that you should be aware of:


1) Parts and warranty service availability are poor with some people reporting it taking weeks or months to get critical parts. Getting battery packs is particularly problematic due to shipping restrictions with the worst (but not the only) problems being reported from places like Hawaii where arranging surface shipping is problematic.


2) There are reports that the propeller and skeg are easily damaged in light groundings even in soft material (sand/mud) that would not affect most gasoline outboards. Repairs are expensive since, as I understand it, the prop is not a separately replaceable part.


3) The control connector between the motor and the battery is susceptible to corrosion and damage and, again, is not available as a separately serviceable part.


Dylan Winter wrote extensively about his experiences in another forum. Loved the motor, he said. Quiet, easier to approach birds, much better experience in the rivers and estuaries of the British Isles. Despite this he went back to a gasser after several repairs in the course of a year or two.
Jammer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 12:30   #6
Writing Full-Time Since 2014
 
thinwater's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Deale, MD
Boat: PDQ Altair, 32/34
Posts: 7,906
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

If there is ANY significant risk of thunderstorms, there is a material risk of very severe weather. Sailing 101. They don't come out of no where, and I bet there was thunder for several minutes (time to recover a dinghy) before they struck. And if you have davits you NEVER leave the dinghy in the water. That's the advantage of having davits!


Yeah, I would keep it light, no more than 6 hp. Planing isn't needed where you sail, and 6 hp will plane one person.
__________________
Gear Testing--Engineering--Sailing
https://sail-delmarva.blogspot.com/
thinwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 12:34   #7
Registered User
 
Jammer's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Minnesota
Boat: Hunter 26
Posts: 2,130
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by JebLostInSpace View Post
What do people like/dislike or think is important when selecting the dinghy and/or outboard?

1) Parts availability
2) Weight
3) Noise
4) Maintenance schedule
5) Product availability in your current location.



In the USA, the product lines are really fragmented in the size range you're looking at. There are IMO three rational choices below 6 hp:
  • The Suzuki 2.5 hp, which is the lightest outboard currently on the market in the USA. It is water cooled. People like them; I've never seen a bad review. Parts availability is good in the USA but spotty internationally.
  • The Honda 2.3 hp. They are air cooled, which makes them loud and means they have a useful life of about 1000 hours or so before the block is shot at which point they're scrap. The advantage is that there's no impeller to replace and no water passages to flush the salt out of. Parts availability is good in the USA but spotty internationally.
  • The Yamaha 3.5 hp. This is the lightest outboard on the market in the USA that delivers more than 2.5 hp. Yamaha doesn't offer anything smaller, their 2.5 is just a derated 3.5 (same size and weight). Parts and service availability are good worldwide.
All the major manufacturers have 6 hp outboards (Tohatsu, Yamaha, Suzuki, Honda) that are all very similar in design, weight, and price, and there are 4 hp and in most cases 5 hp versions of these that are derated versions of the 6. Of these the Suzuki is the lightest at 55 pounds while the Yamaha weighs 59 pounds. So you have to decide if that matters more than the (possibly, depending on where you are) better parts/service availability of the Yamaha.



I have an older (1990s) Tohatsu 9.9 and it took over a week to get a fuel pump for it which I consider unacceptable in this day and age, at least in Minneapolis. There isn't anyplace that has a modern web storefront to sell these parts so you have to flip through a PDF manual, write down part numbers, and someone will get back to you after you fill out the form. They're good motors but there are a bunch of places that stock Yamaha and Suzuki parts, have a great website, and ship the same day.


Outside the USA the choices would be different and you would probably be looking at a Yamaha Enduro 2-stroke, though those don't offer compelling weight savings in the hp range you're looking at.
Jammer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 28-08-2020, 21:06   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: ABC's
Boat: Prout Snowgoose 35
Posts: 1,759
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkeithlu View Post

Small but real RIB recommended- anything that folds is not going to plane as well.
I'm not sure about that. My previous 2.6m inflatable (air floor) would plane 2 up happily and was faster than my aluminium 2.6m rib, which needs a different prop on my outboard and hydrofoils to plane to 2 up. It's also 2-3 knts slower.

The handling is infinitely better though.
mikedefieslife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 01:32   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2018
Boat: 50ft Custom Fast Catamaran
Posts: 4,921
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Do NOT get a West Marine PVC inflatable RIB, even in the northeast.

Mine turned into jelly in only 2 seasons, with the outer layer of material melting off.

Complete rip off.
Chotu is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 02:25   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: On the boat
Boat: Lagoon 400
Posts: 2,139
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

I have now torqueedo 1003 for 2 years and love it. We had 2 warranty issues. One was propeller hitting ground and then develop noise. They replaced seal. Second one was instrument panel got water. Panel replaced under warranty.

Now I cover motor full time and no issues since. It is delicate regarding bottom touch, however it can be easily driven with leg halfway up when around reef.

No deterioration noticed at present. We always have it on davits as dinghy is now so light. Wash it with fresh water after every use.

Also, I have good paddle system, in case motor fails.

My mercury 9.9 played games with me and after 4x carburetor cleaning, I gave up.

Charging is easy and you need less petrol and no mixing oil and no yearly services. It is invaluable for trawling if you into fishing. Going 2 kn for 20 hours, no issues.

Only place where i am not comfortable is around crocks. Would not mind there some noise to scare them way.
arsenelupiga is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 02:53   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 401
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chotu View Post
Do NOT get a West Marine PVC inflatable RIB, even in the northeast.

Mine turned into jelly in only 2 seasons, with the outer layer of material melting off.

Complete rip off.


Sorry, but what do you mean by 'inflatable RIB'? RIBs (Rigid Inflatable Boat) have a rigid hull with inflatable sponsons. Inflatables do not have any rigid parts. Perhaps you meant 'tender' when you wrote 'RIB'?
Yellowtulip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 03:01   #12
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hudson Force's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Lived aboard & cruised for 45 years,- now on a chair in my walk-in closet.
Boat: Morgan OI 413 1973 - Aythya
Posts: 8,246
Images: 1
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkeithlu View Post
.. Consider a 4 HP Tohatsu four stroke. Same as a Nissan, but for less, and they've got the weight down close to the two-strokes. Reliable.

Small but real RIB recommended- anything that folds is not going to plane as well.
I had an opinion, but here it was already shared by tkeithlu.
__________________
Take care and joy, Aythya crew
Hudson Force is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 03:05   #13
Senior Cruiser
 
michaeld's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Pompano Beach, FL
Boat: Kaufman 47
Posts: 135
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

We now have the Tohatsu 5hp propane model on our Achilles 310. We are pleased with it, but I still miss our old 3.5 two-stroker at 29 lbs.
michaeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 03:44   #14
Moderator
 
Pete7's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Solent, England
Boat: Moody 31
Posts: 15,052
Images: 14
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
[*]The Honda 2.3 hp. They are air cooled, which makes them loud and means they have a useful life of about 1000 hours or so before the block is shot at which point they're scrap. The advantage is that there's no impeller to replace and no water passages to flush the salt out of. Parts availability is good in the USA but spotty internationally.
No problem with Honda parts in Europe. Indeed, you can even go into a Honda car dealer and order a new outboard carb for the same money as a outboard dealer. Our 2.3hp is a 2007 model is running well, but needed a new fuel float bowl last year and we also put the 6x after market stainless steel bolts into it before they rusted out completely.

However, its too small for 4 people and a larger dinghy.
Pete7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-08-2020, 03:54   #15
Registered User
 
NYSail's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Long Island, New York
Boat: Beneteau 423 43 feet
Posts: 672
Re: Dinghy & outboard considerations from scratch

I just bought a highfield 310 cl and using my tohatsu 6 hp. The boat is great. Will move up to a 9 or 10 hp next year.
NYSail is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dinghy, outboard

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Using a rip-start dinghy outboard as a generator for the mothership outboard brendanwalls Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 12 15-12-2019 16:56
For Sale: 26' Seafarer w/8hp Honda 4stroke & 10' Dinghy + 3.5hp Eska Outboard & Trailer Alewis1223 Boats For Sale and Wanted 1 11-10-2018 08:56
Hard Dodger Cost & Considerations luciarose Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 16-04-2015 10:01
Special Considerations for electronics mxtommy Marine Electronics 3 27-11-2006 01:06
Crew considerations Michael s/v Infini General Sailing Forum 11 14-08-2006 12:38

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 11:34.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.