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Old 20-02-2021, 13:54   #1
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Rope Ladder going up stays. Name ?

Hi and Thanks everyone for the wealth of info, many of the older large sailboats had rope attached to inner stays so crew could climb up to the spreaders. Name? or type of splices used, to secure to wire stays.

Tayana 37 Pilot House 1986.

Thank you, Pop,s
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Old 20-02-2021, 14:39   #2
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Ratlines.

Often done in 3 strand, backspliced. Make them easy step depths. Wear shoes.

Ann
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Old 20-02-2021, 14:43   #3
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Ratlines! (or that's what we called ours anyway) Kids loved climbing them, and they were mad useful when we had to navigate through reef waters in the Bahamas.
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Old 20-02-2021, 14:44   #4
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

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Ratlines.

Often done in 3 strand, backspliced. Make them easy step depths. Wear shoes.

Ann
YES! Definitely hard on bare feet. Doable, but way better with shoes, particularly if you're going to stand on them for any length of time.
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Old 20-02-2021, 14:51   #5
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Our ratlines are teak steps ... or is there another term for ratlines made of wood slats like this?

Ours are easy on the feet btw.
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Old 20-02-2021, 15:28   #6
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

But isn't it pronounced ratlin's?
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Old 20-02-2021, 19:19   #7
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike OReilly View Post
Our ratlines are teak steps ... or is there another term for ratlines made of wood slats like this?

Ours are easy on the feet btw.

Often called ratboards.
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Old 21-02-2021, 09:24   #8
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

And they are usually on the shrouds, not stays.
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Old 21-02-2021, 10:50   #9
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Ratlines, pronounced "rattlin's", are lengths of thin line tied between the shrouds of a sailing ship to form a ladder. Found on all square rigged ships, whose crews must go aloft to stow the square sails, they also appear on larger fore-and-aft rigged vessels to aid in repairs aloft or conduct a lookout from above.

Lower courses in a ratline are often made of slats of wood (battens) for support where the distance between shrouds is greatest. These wooden boards are called rat-boards. In some instances holes in these slats guide and organise low-tension lines between the deck and the rig.

Although the name clove hitch is given by Falconer in his Dictionary of 1769, the knot is much older, having been tied in ratlines at least as early as the first quarter of the sixteenth century. This is shown in early sculpture and paintings.

— The Ashley Book of Knots

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Old 21-02-2021, 10:55   #10
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

As per Scorpius.

TP
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Old 21-02-2021, 13:14   #11
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

Thank everyone for the help, Cheers Tayana 37 ft. Pilot house, 1986https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/images/smilies/smitten.gif
Wiith a big fat butt for a stern.https://www.cruisersforum.com/forums...es/smitten.gif

Tks Brice
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Old 21-02-2021, 14:38   #12
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

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Originally Posted by Scorpius View Post
And they are usually on the shrouds, not stays.
Ah yes, missed that.

For the OP:
Stays are the fore and aft bracing for a mast

Shrouds are the side to side bracing.
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Old 21-02-2021, 20:42   #13
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Re: Rope Ladder going up stays. Name ?

The fun part is that ratlin, ratline, or ratling is not about rodents.

Displaying the etymology takes a wee bit of effort.

If we stick with English for the nonce, the key events to note are:

* in the 15th century, ratling is used as the name for a particular type of cordage, namely three-strand laid hemp rope, usually tarred, of a medium dimension (fatter than 'small stuff' but much thinner than 'cable').

* by the early 17th century, ratlings were the cordage steps made to the shrouds and then used as ladders by which mariners climbed high in the rigging.

As with many of the nautical words in English, the origins are best described as North Sea sailing vocabulary - a vocabulary shared by sailors working on the same sea and from time to time using the same ports and boats regardless of 'national' identity.

The immediate ancestors of early 15th century ratling are not neatly preserved on parchment. North Sea sailors' speak was an oral language, not a written one.

The etymologists fingers all point in one general direction in this case (dinnae be confused by the initial dual nature of the one direction): to (1) Old French, about 1150, and the word raelingue, the cordage used as bolt rope to reinforce the edges of sails or the edges of fishing nets; and (2) Norman-French/Channel Islands French (undated, because it was not writtne down with a date of publication) rar-lik, the cordage used as bolt rope to reinforce the edges of sails or the edges of fishing nets.

Your copy of Dictionnaire de L’Academie Francaise will like mine take you unerringly to the same point of origin agreed among the wise heads gathered around the table: Old Norse rar-lik, the reinforced edge of a sail attached to a yardarm.

That exposes the components as Old Norse rar or ra, a spar, an oar, a sail-yard; and Old Norse lig or lik a bolt rope, a line, cordage.

Anyone paying attention so far will see that lig or lik is the same as the word leech, currently used for the after edge of a fore-and-aft sail. And know that the predecessor is proto-Germanic lika, a band or binding (that joins or holds things together), a joint of an arm or a leg (think of ligament), an articulation; derived from the proto-Indo-European leyg, leig, to bind, to tie.
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Old 21-02-2021, 21:32   #14
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Re: Rope Latter going up stays. Name ?

I was told that with a teak board its a lot easier to climb as the shrouds don't have a tendency to "bend in" as you place you weight on the steps. Is this right?
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Our ratlines are teak steps ... or is there another term for ratlines made of wood slats like this?

Ours are easy on the feet btw.
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Old 21-02-2021, 21:36   #15
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Re: Rope Ladder going up stays. Name ?

And on that forum, there was a linguist,
A rare linguist, a rattlin' linguist...
And the linguist on the forum and the forum in the hole and the hole in the bog and the bog down in the valley-oh!

Ho ro the rattlin' bog, the bog down in the valley-oh
Real bog the rattlin' bog the bog down in the valley-oh

According to Wikipedia rattlin'=splendid, much like Alan's research on the etymology at hand
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