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Old 27-03-2020, 10:19   #1
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electric through hull

I was wandering if anyone in here has knowledge of the following

A through hull electrically opened with ignition on .

Like most pf us I am sure I will start the motor with out opening the through hull. I t ha s already happened so I am trying to make this prosses idiot proof T
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Old 27-03-2020, 10:25   #2
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Re: electric through hull

Hereís an off the shelf solution. You could also roll your own with an electric actuator.

Or just hang the ignition keys on the seacock so youíve got to look at it to get the keys.



https://www.hodgesmarine.com/grofbve...cock--24v.html
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Old 27-03-2020, 10:28   #3
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Re: electric through hull

The usual memory aid for us "mature" sailors is to hang the ignition key on the seacock handle when it is closed.

I think you will find that a water flow alarm is a LOT cheaper than a valve with an electric actuator. There are many valve/actuator combinations for industrial applications. They are expensive and bulky.

Look here for an example:
https://www.geminivalve.com/store/co...&type=electric
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Old 27-03-2020, 10:52   #4
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Re: electric through hull

Pilots use check lists. Surviving pilots always use check lists. 737 Max8 pilots didn't read the check list.

The best check list item for this is NOT, surprisingly enough, "open seacock." It is "once the engine starts, check for discharging water."

First, seeing the water is not something you have to read, or think about. You just look over the side after hearing the engine catch, and things are right or not right. It's mentally shorter. Also, it covers having opened the seacock, but a tennis ball is stuck in the system and no water comes through, or the pump impeller stripped and no water comes through, or... It's the final check, because "water out" is more informative than "seacock open."
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Old 28-03-2020, 09:56   #5
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Re: electric through hull

It was not on a boat but i once built a computer controlled 12 V electric valve for a hydraulic pimp control system using a Linac linear actuator on a handle fashioned from a piece of flat bar.

The Linac actuator was one built for those electrically tilting hospital beds and consequently had a fairly high weatherproofing rating.
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Old 28-03-2020, 10:48   #6
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Re: electric through hull

Irrigation solenoid vales are commonly available and inexpensive and most operate with 12 volt power. The trick would be finding one with the correct diameter for your raw water line. A jumper to your ignition circuit is all that would be necessary for power. Alternately, and more sensibly of course, is simply hanging the ignition key from the raw water seacock handle as suggested above; or, hanging a small sign on the engine panel with "Seacock Open" on one side and "Seacock Closed" on the opposite side (remembering to reverse the sign when you shut the engine down or re-start it of course!).


FWIW...
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Old 28-03-2020, 12:59   #7
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Re: electric through hull

My worry would be the unsatisfactory durability of electrical stuff in the bilge coupled to the fact that a solenoid valve for this purpose would logically be naturally closed.

Once the user becomes comfortable with the ďautomaticnessĒ of such a device, an open circuit to the valve could be costly. I suppose though that the existence of an overheat buzzer is good insurance.

I depend entirely on my overheat buzzer as my exhaust outlet is below the waterline - no good waiting to hear the splashing. But I never close the seacock unless for inspection or maintenance. A friend also has an exhaust outlet below the waterline but has installed a bleeder line off the raw water system that sends a tiny jet of water out the side of the boat alongside the cockpit. I always wanted one, never got round to installing it.
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Old 30-03-2020, 05:09   #8
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Re: electric through hull

I think that if I had a cooling water discharge underwater, with a seacock that always stayed open, I'd rip the whole thing out and make one above the waterline. Putting it below the waterline gives priority to a very small bit of esthetics (smooth hull, no squirt/stain) over a bunch of safety (seeing the discharge, popping an under water hose). It really tells you how far a manufacturer will go in a decision between beauty and safety.

OK. Today's rant: Safety is multilayered. Sure, we're talking about a vanishingly small number of cases of stripped impellers and blocked discharges. But the consequences of a rare failure are pretty bad - right up to the engine seizing at an embarrassing moment, or sinking the boat from a popped hose that could have been above the waterline. Assemble enough of these low probability events and you get a high probability event. Rely on a complex safety device (electric seacock) and you've got a nice failure chain - corroded electrical connection to boat failure. I don't think that having an electric seacock is a substitute for looking over the side or hearing the splash.

I hope that you will straighten out your boat in this process. Keep it simple, keep it safe.
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Old 31-03-2020, 11:56   #9
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Re: electric through hull

Quote:
Originally Posted by tkeithlu View Post
I think that if I had a cooling water discharge underwater, with a seacock that always stayed open, I'd rip the whole thing out and make one above the waterline. Putting it below the waterline gives priority to a very small bit of esthetics (smooth hull, no squirt/stain) over a bunch of safety (seeing the discharge, popping an under water hose). It really tells you how far a manufacturer will go in a decision between beauty and safety
You donít seriously think that the whole exhaust from engine to skin fitting lies below water level?

No. Actually it runs from the engine at bilge level to a water lift (totally normal) that lifts the cooling water to just below deck level and then back down to the skin fitting below the waterline. And the exhaust pipe is that robust that it would tear a hole in the hull before it failed. The danger of this becoming a safety issue is really a huge stretch.

Primary reasons for below-waterline exit? The boat is a centre cockpit which makes taking the exhaust to the stern more challenging so it exits alongside the engine (at the cockpit). So for me, the layout saves a lot of bulky engineering down below and being underwater means it is comparatively very quiet, especially when on anchor. I can run my engine to charge batteries or run the watermaker at 1200RPM and neighboring boats will only hear the splashing of the bubbles. And I can relax in the relative peace as well and the smell of exhaust emissions in the cockpit are also significantly reduced.

I have a friend with a Beneteau Oceanis 40, circa 2010 that is nice and quiet on board but you really donít want to anchor near him when he has to run his engine - external noise is huge. Not my taste.
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Old 31-03-2020, 12:08   #10
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Re: electric through hull

If you go ahead, select your DC operated valve carefully. Not opening, even when a air or DC signal is present, is a common fault in industrial settings.
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Old 31-03-2020, 12:09   #11
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Re: electric through hull

Aqualarm raw water flow detector provides an instant alarm if flow is restricted.

https://aqualarm.net/cooling-water-flow-c-2/
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Old 31-03-2020, 13:26   #12
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Re: electric through hull

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Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
Aqualarm raw water flow detector provides an instant alarm if flow is restricted.

https://aqualarm.net/cooling-water-flow-c-2/
Yes, thatís an easy solution, far less work than the tell-tale water jet I had in mind. Might consider fitting one, for $150 itís doable.

Thanks
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