Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
  This discussion is proudly sponsored by:
Please support our sponsors and let them know you heard about their products on Cruisers Forums. Advertise Here
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 14-01-2017, 19:01   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: St Mary's Georgia
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Antigua 37
Posts: 48
Accessing fouled saildrive well

Evening all

Coming to the end of prep for barrier coat application. The last area that needs addressing are the saildrive wells.

The old boots (if indeed there were any) are long gone and all manner of seagoing critters have fouled the inside of these wells. Access is very limited, there is obviously room to access the drive leg fixing bolts but not enough room to get in and prep the surface. The well is quite large in volume but closes by way of a solid flange (part of the hull) to within 3 inches of the drive leg to the sides and a couple of inches at the front and back.

So I remove the drive leg to get enough space to get in a clean, sand and apply barrier coat or just leave well alone and just fashion a new fairing plate and seal?

If I remove what exactly is entailed in removing the drive leg? I have downloaded the service manual but it didn't make clear to me what's involved.

Hoping for the usual helpful advice.

Regards

Richard
__________________

Fluffflinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-01-2017, 20:52   #2
Registered User

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Jane Bay, Barkley Sound, West Coast Vancouver Island
Boat: Cooper, Banner 37'
Posts: 50
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

You haven't mentioned the make of your drive, so my experiance with a volvo 110s may not apply.

Our drive was held on by 6 (I think) bolts. Getting it off is easy, just watch out for the weight. Getting back on, however, can be an exercise in frustration. The frustrating part is trying to blindly get the bolts aligned with the holes.

My sanity was saved by a marine mechanic, who heard my distress, and showed me the easy way. You get 2 bolts that are the same diameter & thread, but longer. Cut the heads off and finger tighten them into the threaded holes. Align the drive, place the gasket and slide it up those headless bolts into place. Install a couple of the proper bolts, take out the headless ones, and finish installing. Torque the bolts to factory specs.
__________________

__________________
Richard aboard S/V Gandalf III
Quait Bay near Tofino, BC
Gandalf is a 1983 Cooper Banner 37
seamountie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 05:42   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: St Mary's Georgia
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Antigua 37
Posts: 48
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Sorry for not detailing the make. Yanmar SD 20's.
Fluffflinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 06:45   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
GordMay's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 38,198
Images: 241
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Quote:
Originally Posted by seamountie View Post
... You get 2 bolts that are the same diameter & thread, but longer. Cut the heads off and finger tighten them into the threaded holes. Align the drive, place the gasket and slide it up those headless bolts into place. Install a couple of the proper bolts, take out the headless ones, and finish installing. Torque the bolts to factory specs.
You might also saw a slot into the the cut end of these aligning bolts. Might make it a little easier to remove.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 19:01   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
SV Bacchus's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Presently in the Chesapeake
Boat: Leopard 42 OV
Posts: 1,288
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Quote:
Originally Posted by seamountie View Post
My sanity was saved by a marine mechanic, who heard my distress, and showed me the easy way. You get 2 bolts that are the same diameter & thread, but longer. Cut the heads off and finger tighten them into the threaded holes. Align the drive, place the gasket and slide it up those headless bolts into place. Install a couple of the proper bolts, take out the headless ones, and finish installing. Torque the bolts to factory specs.
That is a really great idea. Love those 'tricks of the trade' from mechanics who have been around the block a few times!
__________________
SV Bacchus - Living the good life!
SV Bacchus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 19:02   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
SV Bacchus's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Presently in the Chesapeake
Boat: Leopard 42 OV
Posts: 1,288
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
You might also saw a slot into the the cut end of these aligning bolts. Might make it a little easier to remove.
And that is another great trick of the trade! I was initially thinking vise-grips but this would work great.
__________________
SV Bacchus - Living the good life!
SV Bacchus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 19:15   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Caribbean
Boat: Island Spirit 401 Catamaran
Posts: 509
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

While the ideas for putting a leg back on are great and I could be wrong but I am not sure I would bother anti-fouling that space at all until a leg had to come out mechanical reasons.
Ostinato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-01-2017, 20:53   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Great Neck, N.Y.
Boat: Lancer 30, Little Jumps
Posts: 630
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffflinger View Post
Evening all
So I remove the drive leg to get enough space to get in a clean, sand and apply barrier coat or just leave well alone and just fashion a new fairing plate and seal?
Richard
...or maybe, as my friend (Hanse 34) and others have done with their SD 20 wells.
Insert low density Polystyrene expandable foam,
it is said to eliminate/fill large space for nasties to grow, provide some
extra lift/flotation??, provide additional attachment area for boot, and maybe
provide some comfort to those concerned with large hole in hull.

I have not done on my SD20 as I have been fortunate that my boot has
been in place with ...thinking Boat life/life calk ...for last 6-7 years.
__________________
hugosalt
s/v Little Jumps
Lancer 30
hugosalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 09:39   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: St Mary's Georgia
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Antigua 37
Posts: 48
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Well it would appear that to drop the leg you have to move the engine forward several inches to fully dis-engage the the drive gear.

That is not happening so it will be over to my wife's small hands to get in and clean up as best we can and then fashion another boot.

The only saving grace is that fixing a frame to hold in a new boot will be easy as I have a solid flange into which I can screw.

I will probably tape some plastic over that the well area lay up some glass and than tape another layer of plastic over that lay up. Should be no problem to shape that after it has cured and then slide on a boot tuck that under the new glass fairing plate and screw that to the flange on both sides. This will mean I can have a one piece fairing plate and not have to make something in two halves. I also think a mechanical fixing is better than relying on Lifecaulk or 5200 to hold the boot in place. Suggestions for boot material, old truck inner tube???
Fluffflinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 10:12   #10
Registered User

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Jane Bay, Barkley Sound, West Coast Vancouver Island
Boat: Cooper, Banner 37'
Posts: 50
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

I would double check that. It sounds like you are talking about taking the entire saildrive unit off. No need. To clear the well you only have to remove the leg from the transmission. You would have to move the engine to disconnect the transmission from it. See the parts schematic right here on CF: http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...7&d=1210030280
__________________
Richard aboard S/V Gandalf III
Quait Bay near Tofino, BC
Gandalf is a 1983 Cooper Banner 37
seamountie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 10:17   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: St Mary's Georgia
Boat: Fountaine Pajot Antigua 37
Posts: 48
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Thanks Richard. So just removing the leg is simply unbolt from the well and she drops out? That is what I had thought originally. Obviously I need to drain oil etc.

Would make my life easier to clean out well and re paint the outdrive.

best

Richard
Fluffflinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 11:13   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Great Neck, N.Y.
Boat: Lancer 30, Little Jumps
Posts: 630
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fluffflinger View Post
Suggestions for boot material, old truck inner tube???
Maybe a product like liquid rubber, (Flex Seal?) Lowe or Home Depot,,,advertised at night on TV.
Can pour/form to your required shape, thickness and cures to a flexible
rubber piece.
Been thinking of a use such as making own boot but have never used.
__________________
hugosalt
s/v Little Jumps
Lancer 30
hugosalt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 13:15   #13
Registered User

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Jane Bay, Barkley Sound, West Coast Vancouver Island
Boat: Cooper, Banner 37'
Posts: 50
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Yuppers, Richard. Just watch the weight. The lower drive on my volvo wasn't super heavy, but 'tweren't light either.

Have fun.
Richard
__________________
Richard aboard S/V Gandalf III
Quait Bay near Tofino, BC
Gandalf is a 1983 Cooper Banner 37
seamountie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 15:21   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 51
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

I cleaned out my wells with white vinegar. It dissolves all critters, or at the least it weakened the bond so I could pressure wash and scrape (with a plastic brush). I mixed the vinegar with some wall paper paste to make a mix that would stay on horizontal and vertical services, left it for a few days, then washed and scraped the buggers off. Seems like a lot of trouble to remove the saildrives to clean such a small area. I can't understand the benefit of a boot. They usually fall off, and will not make any difference to performance. And if they don't fall off, critters will still be able to get into the well. But, I am quite open to reasons why a boat is needed...
sirfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-01-2017, 15:25   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 51
Re: Accessing fouled saildrive well

Sorry... typo error...I meant a 'boot ' is needed....
As for a boat....it's a want, not a need!
__________________

sirfer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sail, saildrive

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Prop fouled and milky saildrive oil TopperHarley Propellers & Drive Systems 12 05-04-2012 17:31
Accessing Bank Account from a Third World Location bcripps Boat Ownership & Making a Living 27 17-09-2011 20:20
Accessing Your Cash in the Bahamas and Caribbean ianlgv Liveaboard's Forum 14 16-11-2010 11:46

Advertise Here


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:57.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.