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Old 19-06-2023, 12:05   #1
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US cruising permit confusion

Good day all,

I am a US citizen/resident with a forign flagged boat that is currently in the United States. Last year I entered the US in Norfolk using the ROAM app and was granted a cruising permit. After that I relocated the boat to another part of the county without reporting my arrival in the new port.

Today I was boarded by CBp and was told I had violated the permit and was given a warning. I asked where it says I need to report different ports and why even have a cruising permit if you need to do this. I was told you don't need to report within a field office jurisdiction but if you move jurisdiction. So I asked for a map and the officer was unable to provide.

After he left I called to supervisor office for the region I am in and explained the situation (there was also some other information I was given contrary to what I had been told before but thats outside the scope of this post). The supervisor told me this was not correct and I only need to report coming in to the US and after I can move freely.

So I was given a warning from an officer that said one thing and a supervisor saying another.

The ROAM app clearly has a place to report new ports but I can't find any guidance in 19 CFR that says anything about change of port reporting. I'm happy to comply with the rules but I need to know exactly what they are and right now no one seems to know.

What are others experience with this?

Thanks
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Old 19-06-2023, 12:54   #2
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

You have to report every change of port even when you have a USCG "cruising license". What you don't need to do is to formally clear in and out every time, which would mean filling out paperwork.

Check this page.

HTH
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Old 19-06-2023, 15:59   #3
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

Thanks for the reply but Noonsite is not an official source more does it cite the source. its the only place on the internet I have found that says I need to report. I'm wondering if anyone has any practical experience or a source.
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Old 19-06-2023, 16:27   #4
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

The cruising permit requires one to check in after every boat movement. Sometimes, depending upon the district and the officer you speak with, you might get permission to move around a bit more before having to report in. Most of the time you don't get a human when calling in; I usually spoke to an answering machine.

Anecdotally, foreign cruisers have been fined the maximum amount for going from one dock position to another without reporting in.

It is an irksome and onerous activity to have to report in every night after sailing; but those are the rules the USA has decided to make and enforce. I'm surprised you only got a warning; perhaps because you are a citizen and only the boat is foreign.

I believe that the supervisor you spoke with is incorrect, in fact I'm fairly certain he was incorrect. I've had 3 cruising permits and travelled a lot with them. I felt that the authorities kept a pretty close eye on my movements - but I also squawk an AIS signal the time, letting them know where I am and where I'm heading. I've not been boarded in the USA, but several times I've had extended VHF interviews with the CG.

19 CFR 4.94 basically states that without the cruising permit, each movement of a foreign vessel requires clearing in an out (at a port of entry). It doesn't specify the reporting requirements with the license. This is part of the paperwork of the license itself. I'm aboard right now, and perhaps tomorrow I can dig out the paperwork of one of my old licenses. They are old-school facsimiles and very hard to decipher. But if you have a permit you should be able to find the reporting rules there.
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Old 19-06-2023, 16:28   #5
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

Thanks for the reply but again... is there a source that says that I need to do this? cause 19 CFR part 4 does not say this.
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Old 19-06-2023, 16:56   #6
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

Take a look at 19 CFR 19.494(D) https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/19/4.94

Upon arrival at each port or place in the United States, the master shall report the fact of arrival to the Customs officer at the nearest customhouse. Such report shall be immediately made.


No requirement to "clear" or pay fees but must report arrival.

Several articles talk to the fact these requirements may be interpreted differently and inconsistently enforced depending on the port- just to confuse things more!
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Old 19-06-2023, 17:18   #7
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

Fwiw, it is common to have to report port changes within a country, for visitors with cruising permits. Sometimes, a phone call is adequate; others, mainly clearance ports, you have to go to the Customs office and show your papers. In Mexico, it is the local Capitan del Puerto to whom you report. Reductio al absurdum: your boat is foreign and they want to know where it is to be found, so one does it, in a friendly fashion, in order to leave a clean wake.

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Old 20-06-2023, 04:10   #8
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Re: US cruising permit confusion

Quote:
Take a look at 19 CFR 19.494(D) https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/19/4.94

Upon arrival at each port or place in the United States, the master shall report the fact of arrival to the Customs officer at the nearest customhouse. Such report shall be immediately made.
My last paper cruising license stated that I'm allowed to cruise the US waters and be exempt from the following (see attachment)...

... which doesn't exempt reporting my arrival at a new port. QED.

HTH
Dirk
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