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Old 23-04-2017, 11:27   #16
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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I get my skivvies in a knot about that because in the northern reaches of My Beloved Adopted Land the are whole villages - "reservations" - of indigenous peoples that do not have uncontaminated drinking water. For the price of a 50-foot Nordhavn you could buy a village a water maker of adequate capacity! Well, that isn't your problem to solve, but you get my drift.
Lol, now I'm going to feel extra guilty when I go out on my floating Family Truckster of a boat. Wouldn't a Nordhavn be over $2million new? Friends of mine developed water purifiers for third-world that cost very little, seems like you could buy a Nordhavn-load of water purification for $2mil.

My boat is probably the on the extreme of non-seaworthy boats, not quite a houseboat but no trawler. It is a planing hull with a bulbous bow containing a queen bed. It does surprisingly well in tall-skinny freshwater waves breaking over the bow. I can take them abeam or astern surprisingly well. I guess I attribute that to the deep-V and being overpowered, going slow in big waves like a trawler would bring the suck.

I didn't buy this boat to go out in weather, but have had to spend days pushing through waves I would not have gone out in, and been very surprised at how well it did. As an old engineer and someone who has spent most of his life on big power and sail boats, I can say hull design is far more complex than how "trawler-like" a boat appears to be, even out of the water.

A large boat with a hull and engines capable of planing adds another dimension to dealing with weather, that isn't available with a displacement hull. Speeding ahead of bad weather or mushing through big waves on a semi-plane shortens the pain greatly. At great cost, but there are always compromises. I just burned 180,000 pounds of jet fuel flying to Narita. Lots of people would rather have sailed, but life sometimes doesn't offer what you really prefer.
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Old 23-04-2017, 12:44   #17
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

I'm glad to report that we are working on it :-) "The Feds" [means something different here :-)] have just laid down 30 million to fix the water on ONE reserve that has been on a "boil water" advisory for nearly 20 years. Talk about "third world", eh?

The estimate for fixing ALL the potable water problems in the North is 1.4 BILLION.

We could buy quite a little fleet of "Nordhavns" for that :-)!

TP
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Old 23-04-2017, 14:19   #18
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

Sounds like they need a big municipal water purifier, or several.

My wife and I took a lot of people out on our boat when we bought it last fall, some actually didn't know how to react when we had no beer. Some had to have a discussion about maybe going to get some beer so they could go out for a half-hour ride. I was kind of embarrassed for them, there are people in the world without safe drinking water! I do keep beer on the boat, just didn't have any some days or maybe they didn't like my dark beer, dunno. I had just bought the boat and had other priorities.
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Old 23-04-2017, 14:31   #19
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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Sounds like they need a big municipal water purifier, or several.

My wife and I took a lot of people out on our boat when we bought it last fall, some actually didn't know how to react when we had no beer. Some had to have a discussion about maybe going to get some beer so they could go out for a half-hour ride. I was kind of embarrassed for them, there are people in the world without safe drinking water! I do keep beer on the boat, just didn't have any some days or maybe they didn't like my dark beer, dunno. I had just bought the boat and had other priorities.
As I recall beer was common practice in place of water. I still subscribe to the practice.
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Old 23-04-2017, 15:17   #20
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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As I recall beer was common practice in place of water. I still subscribe to the practice.
Maybe "light" beer. I'll definitely have to keep some in the back of my fridge for rude guests, emergencies, brushing my teeth, washing the dog, etc.
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Old 23-04-2017, 16:19   #21
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

Brewing of beer was the original method for preserving water, and is still by far the best. The wimpy stuff sold under such labels as Coor's Lite obviously doesn't cut the ice either as preserved water or as a jollification agent. It represents either a total failure on the part of the brewers to comprehend the fundamentals of their craft or a total conquest and annihilation by Madison Avenue of all that is meet and just.

IPA, as in Burton-on-Trent, was taken to the very limit of what yeast is capable of doing, conversion-wise, before it croaks. The preserved water was then shipped in tuns to the sundry "factories" in the Far East where John Company held, or had held, sway. There it was cut with local water three-to-one lest it should lay a man low before his "east of Suez" thirst had been slaked.

In my native land both Carlsberg and Tuborg used to turn out a decent brew in two styles, the one being a knock-off of the venerable "Urquell" Pilsner Bier, from a place then called "Budweis" in what is now Czechoslovakia, the other an ale reminiscent of German "Altbier". Some decades ago Budweisser's i.e. Anheusser-Busch's, legions of cost accountants and marketing men stuck their oars in the Carlsberg/Tuborg water and transformed all four brews into undifferentiated Mid-Atlantic piss.

Fortunately "micro-breweries" have come to the rescue now that we no longer must live in the shadow of the Volstead Act which had a certain extraterritorial whiff about it :-)!

Still, a number of Canada's "leading families" owe their present riches to their cocking a snoot at that unfortunate piece of legislation.

No cloud without a silver lining, eh :-)?

TP
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Old 23-04-2017, 22:33   #22
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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Buy a copy of "The Nature of Boats" by Dave Gerr. Excellent, wide ranging, easy to read and very clear. Gerr is the director of the Westlawn Institute of Yacht Design, has a well regarded design firm and is a good author. This is the best book available for increasing your understanding about the various factors in yacht design.


I have just finished it, and I say The Nature of Boats by Gerr is one of the best boat books EVER! Informative, well-written, and even some funny bits.
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Old 24-04-2017, 05:14   #23
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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I'm glad to report that we are working on it :-) "The Feds" [means something different here :-)] have just laid down 30 million to fix the water on ONE reserve that has been on a "boil water" advisory for nearly 20 years. Talk about "third world", eh?

The estimate for fixing ALL the potable water problems in the North is 1.4 BILLION.

We could buy quite a little fleet of "Nordhavns" for that :-)!

TP
Lets start another thread about how we poured half a billion dollars into Attawapiskat over 15yrs with no accounting or oversight and yet these few hundred people still live in shacks with no running water but the chief lives a pretty good life style by Donald Trumps standards. We could have bought each one of those families a "trawler" and they could be cruising the Bahamas with their chief right now.

Ok, back to the real world and the OP's request for info .....

Let's take a look at more meaningful information than hull block coefficients.

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Old 07-05-2017, 00:22   #24
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

May also look up the Dashews.
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Old 07-05-2017, 07:56   #25
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

Tad Roberts wrote an article titled Powerboat Design for WoodenBoat that was published in the magazine & then again in their October 2012 issues of MotorBoats. It's very informative & I think is just what you're looking for. All boats are a compromise & I think the most important thing is to be realistic about how you are going to use the boat and then buy the boat that is most suitable for that task. Nordhavns are LRCs (long range cruisers) while Grand Banks are coastal cruisers. Nordhavns are soft chined (pronounced slow roll) & normally have active stabilization. Grand Banks are hard chined (short fast roll) & typically are not stabilized. Soft chined full displacement hulled boats like Nordhavns & Willards are more seaworthy & efficient than hard chined semidisplacement boats like Grand Banks, Marine Traders & Albins but dealing with the rolling is a real issue. Active fins are expensive & often unreliable while paravanes create more drag & can be dangerous if not controlled. Steadying sails are typically too small to be effective.

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Old 09-05-2017, 01:53   #26
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

Hi
I am new to this site (but not to boats or cruising) as I am a professional marine surveyor, a converted sail boat cruiser and have now gone over to the "dark side" with a 42' twin screw semi displacement cruiser.
There actually is a book that will answer the questions you have raised.
Robert Beebes famous book, "Voyaging Under Power" has been updated for I think the 3rd time, by Denis Umstot, who has addressed many of the issues you have raised. It is very up to date and is worth reading. I have the original Beebe issue in hardcover and have downloaded the 4th edition in Kindle!
I am based in Tasmania, where the cruising is very similar to the Pacific Northwest, I believe. I will know next week, as we are flying out to the US, tomorrow for Seattle, Vancouver and places North.
Cheers
Al
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Old 15-05-2017, 16:34   #27
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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I have just finished it, and I say The Nature of Boats by Gerr is one of the best boat books EVER! Informative, well-written, and even some funny bits.
I'll add my vote for "The Nature of Boats".
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Old 15-05-2017, 19:34   #28
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Re: Resource for understanding cruiser design

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I'll add my vote for "The Nature of Boats".
OK, I just ordered it from Amazon.
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