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ejlindahl 02-02-2012 11:12

Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
How durable are these. I am thinking of getting a used 2002 12 footer that the seller says has only been unfolded and used a dozen times, and kept in the garage otherwise.

How durable are the plastic hinging parts of the hull? This is 10 years old now, does this plastic age so that the hinging parts are getting brittle and ready to break or leak?

Do you have one and do you like it?

Thank you

Eric

sarafina 02-02-2012 11:16

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
We have an 02 and it has taken all kinds of abuse, mostly stowed in the open, transom rotted some before we got her and got a new one, but we still have the old de-laminated one and it would work as a back up if we needed it to.

Had it almost 3 years now, one tough little sucker, and fun ; -)

Power wash her off occasionally and she is good to go!

how much he want for her?

captain465 02-02-2012 11:23

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Have a 2000 that has lived out in the sun for it's entire life......Same as Sarafina said, the wooden transom went bad, but the plastic is in fine shape, although alittle sun burned and chalked from sun exposure. It'a fine little boat.

rebel heart 02-02-2012 11:31

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Is that the same plastic they use for walker bays? I have a walker bay 8 that gets roasted all summer long without an issue.

ejlindahl 02-02-2012 11:31

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
He's asking $850 with an electric trolling motor which I don't particularly want. Is that a reasonable price?


Walker bay is polyethylene. I think this is different, it only folds to 4" thick, origami like.

Mike OReilly 02-02-2012 11:33

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
We bought a 10' about five years ago. So far, no complaints. Tough as nails, easy to stow, and light. Easily handles the two of us with gear. Takes a small outboard (60# for the 10'), and rows nearly as good as a rigid. That being said, it's probably not for everyone, nor does it do everything well. We bought it b/c davits are not an option (not desired either, but that's a different discussion), and I hate dragging a dingy on anything other than very short hops.

It's not a perfect dingy, but nothing is perfect when it comes to this sailing life.

captain465 02-02-2012 11:40

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
One note of interest......when towing a Porte-bote, keep it on a very short painter. It is so light, that it will tend to flip from the mother ships wake. Don't ask me how I know this!!

Blue Crab 02-02-2012 20:08

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I hate to argue with the oh-so-lovely Sarafina, but a proper dink is one of the joys of the sailing life.

A porta boat is not a proper dink.

ejlindahl 02-02-2012 20:17

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Tg I agree with you. Actually my intent is to put it on the roof of my land yacht in case I want to venture out on some lake. I also may throw it on board my boat as a back up or alternate dink for the crew to do there own thing.

Any one have an idea if $850 is a reasonable price for a 10 yr old 12 footer?

Thanks

myosys 02-02-2012 20:27

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ejlindahl (Post 878359)
Tg I agree with you. Actually my intent is to put it on the roof of my land yacht in case I want to venture out on some lake. I also may throw it on board my boat as a back up or alternate dink for the crew to do there own thing.

Any one have an idea if $850 is a reasonable price for a 10 yr old 12 footer?

Thanks

You should check with Portabote to see how much a new one is.
I have an 8' and 10' of recent vintage; the newer ones have plastic/aluminum transoms so there is no problem with wood rot.

If the transom is wood; he should drop the price...

The plastic "hinge" points are very durable in my opinion. Have cruised with it all around New England.

The seats are less durable; especially from the older models I hear.

There is a fairly active Yahoo group for Portabotes; you could ask around there.

sarafina 02-02-2012 20:28

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ejlindahl (Post 877900)
He's asking $850 with an electric trolling motor which I don't particularly want. Is that a reasonable price?

Seems a bit high to me. and that trolling motor? ditch it and get a 2hp outboard. That lil thang will stand up and dance over the waves with a good little outboard on her. $500 sounds about right, but I'm cheap ; -)

Quote:

Originally Posted by tgzzzz (Post 878348)
I hate to argue with the oh-so-lovely Sarafina, but a proper dink is one of the joys of the sailing life.

A porta boat is not a proper dink.

Nope, but it's a NIFTY tender. Folds up and rides on the life lines of our little Cal28 sweet as can be. Beats the bulk of anything else hands down for our purpose. And it goes on top of the roof rack nicely too.

And you can put proper oarlocks on it if you want.

You can get one of the new plastic transoms if you don't like the plywood. The ply actually do fine if they get fresh paint every year or so. Ours had been REALLY neglected...

New benches too from Porta Bote if yours are messed up.
I love my bote ; -)

onestepcsy37 02-02-2012 22:12

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
cruising friends of mine have had a portabote for ten years now. took it from fort lauderdale to turkey over a seven year cruise. liked it so much he gave me his inflatable - said he liked the portabote so much better. and this on a 40 foot center cockpit ketch. can't recall what size it is but i did row it once and was really impressed and how well it tracked. he claims he can plane it with his 3hp yamaha....

sarafina 02-02-2012 23:10

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by onestepcsy37 (Post 878440)
he claims he can plane it with his 3hp yamaha....

Yep ; -)

S/V Alchemy 03-02-2012 10:19

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I can get me and my 10 foot Portabote to five knots with a Honda 2, the one that weighs about 28 pounds. The range of the one-litre tank is about 10 NM, it seems.

I also have a nesting dinghy with a largish sail rig. Together, the pair give me flexibility to have the sailing tender for my son to muck around in, and the Portabote for "cargo". I have no hesitation about flinging bicycles or jerry cans or engine parts in the Portabote.

ctl411 03-02-2012 10:30

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
We like our 14 foot portabote will go 18 plus with two adults two kids plus fishing gear. If you get a 12 look at the seat mounts of the 14 its much better makes the boat stiffer rows better. We had a 12 until i found the 14 used.

JimF 21-03-2012 14:06

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ejlindahl (Post 877883)
How durable are these. I am thinking of getting a used 2002 12 footer that the seller says has only been unfolded and used a dozen times, and kept in the garage otherwise.

How durable are the plastic hinging parts of the hull? This is 10 years old now, does this plastic age so that the hinging parts are getting brittle and ready to break or leak?

Do you have one and do you like it?

Thank you

Eric

After years of Avon's, Zodiacs, etc. I bought a portaboat took it to the Med. Nine summers of cloudless skies later I replaced the wooden transom and seats. The hull was every bit as good as it was when I started out. Sold everything over there came back and bought another portaboat Seats and transom are now plastic, probably last forever. I've got the small one now. It planes (one 180# person) easily with a 2 hp Merc. You can't dive or snorkel out of it (and get back in) unless you rig it with flotation tubing. Otherwise inflatable don't even come close for space, durability, "rowability" and cost. Good sailing!

Canibul 31-03-2015 06:27

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I know this is bumping an old thread, but hey, I keep getting told to use the Search function, and I do and this is what happens. I have a question for you Porta-Bote owners who also snorkel and swim etc. I've seen the bow boarding ladder PB sells. But I have a question. Assuming you normally dive/snorkel in pairs, hasn't anyone used the two person small boat boarding methods in which you use the weight of one of you to offset the roll motion of the boat while the other climbs aboard? If I hang on one side of the Porta-Bote, can't I control the boat while my partner clambers aboard from the other side? And then with her dry weight counterbalancing my lighter water weight on my side of the boat, I think I can get my ownself over my gunnel without too much drama. Fling a heavy leg over quickly, and the weight is pretty equalized at that point. If it's a factor, Hang your heavy gear on a line at the transom and pull it up after you, instead of trying to clamber aboard with tank and weights.

Doesn't anyone else do this? I've done this kind of maneuver many times in my 52 years of diving. Works in tandem kayaks, Sunfish, rowboats, and I don't see why it wouldn't work on a Porta-Bote. It's not rocket surgery. Is there something about this flexible boat that prevents this?

I'm very interested in getting rid of my West Marine RIB and getting a PB, but I have absolutely no experience with them. And can't find anyone in this country who has one to even look at or talk to about it. I'm trying to find a used one in the Miami area, so I can get it to Tropical Shipping or G&G to get it down here.

ShaktiGurl 31-03-2015 06:59

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Yep! Shaktisboy and I have used this method of boarding. We even did it with a hooka system in the boat and now with tanks. It is not that difficult but not particularly pretty :) You do ship some water but not too much and easily bailed. We have a 12ft and 10ft but I much prefer the 12ft.

Mike OReilly 31-03-2015 07:49

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Used this technique with our canoe Canibul. Haven't tried it (yet) with our PB, mainly b/c we've cruised in places where swimming isn't desirable (cooold water), but I can't see why it wouldn't work. In fact, it should be easier with a PB.

Canibul 31-03-2015 09:33

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Thanks for the feedback. I've been studying the videos and think I have a pretty good feel for that boat already. Watching it moving on the water I am reminded of a soft version of a panga in some ways, with the length to beam ratio. It stays at 5 feet wide no matter how long it gets, eh? I'm way okay with that. Our 22 x 7 ft. panga was our favorite CC by far.

Does the 14 plane faster with the same hp outboard, ride chop better, row easier etc than the 12 ft? I think the 12 is the best boat for the two of us, but suspect the 14 is the best handling.

four winds 31-03-2015 11:02

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
How hard is it to assemble on deck, say after ariving at a remote anchorage?

Any tips for a friend with this challenge?

Mike OReilly 31-03-2015 11:29

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by four winds (Post 1789788)
How hard is it to assemble on deck, say after ariving at a remote anchorage? Any tips for a friend with this challenge?

We assemble/disassemble ours on the foredeck of our 37-foot cutter. Prior to this we did the same thing on our 34-foot ketch. The task is not hard, but does take two of us about 15 minutes moving at a normal pace. If it's urgent (like the pub is about to close :wink:), we can get it together much faster. I can also put it together by myself, but it takes a bit longer. All in all, it's not very hard.

Tips... How easy or hard it is will depend on your working space. It's a skill that one gets better at with practice, so don't get frustrated at first. Only other tip I can think of is make sure you're working over the deck when installing the transom bolts. Like all stainless hardware, those buggers like to go for a swim. :redface:

four winds 31-03-2015 11:39

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Thanks Mike. My friends have a 26 Westerly and I'm not sure if it has been attempted on deck yet. Soon they will be coastal cruising so this will come up one day.

msponer 31-03-2015 12:05

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Canibul (Post 1789707)
Does the 14 plane faster with the same hp outboard, ride chop better, row easier etc than the 12 ft? I think the 12 is the best boat for the two of us, but suspect the 14 is the best handling.

Our 12' easily planes with our family of four and an 8hp 2-stroke Yamaha. We weigh a little under 500 pounds. I don't know how fast we go, but fast enough, and a heck of a lot faster than our ~10' inflatable with the same engine.

It does not plane with an additional ~100 pounds of kids on board (2 ~9 year olds). But it still goes fast-ish.

Maybe we should have gotten a 14' one. But the 12' is nice because it fits assembled on the foredeck and doesn't get in the way of our sails. The 14' would not.

I've found it pretty easy to assemble and disassemble. Easier than our inflatable, which is the kind with the interlocking aluminum floor panels.

ejlindahl 31-03-2015 15:32

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
keep in mind the sides (chines) are flexible so they will give a bit if you and your mate try and pull your selves over the side with or with out dive gear. I've never done this so I don't know if it will complicate this boarding technique. Any one out there who has should chime in please.

Also on both my older 10' and newer 12' the chines flex when you pull hard on the oars. You can't quickly maximize your stoke like on a wood, glass or even inflatable dink. I usually get the boat up to speed over 3 or 4 strokes. Then gradually lengthen the strokes where I start with medium effort and throughout the stroke increase the pull harder and harder ending with maximum pull. It still beats rowing an inflatable hands down, you just can't man handle it for quick acceleration/manuevers.

PS: Being the OP I did end up buying that 12 footer 3 years ago but decided a 10 footer fit my use better. Sold for more than I paid it to a Vancouverite who came all the way to Seattle because, with duty, they are very expensive up there. Bought an older,(~2000) well used 10 footer for ~$600. It planes with my 40 year old 2 hp Evinrude if I use a tiller extension (1" pvc pipe) and sit in the middle.

Canibul 01-04-2015 07:40

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Thanks for the info. I'm pretty well set on getting one, for a number of reasons. No need to go into them all here. My biggest issues in making the swap are whether to buy new or used. New with an outboard looked good until I found out they can't sell me a two stroke. So then I figured to find a used one near the shipping terminals in Miami, but now I pretty much realize that I either need to buy a new one and get my own two stroke, or go up to the US and buy a used one in person and ship it to myself here.

On the rowing flex aspect of it, this is probably a stupid question from someone who doesn't know what he's talking about (me) because he's never seen a PB in person, but would something like a five foot section of PVC pipe across the boat, somehow attached between the oarlocks, stiffen that up somehow? A boathook, cut to length, perhaps?

Just curious. I've been studying the videos and see the flex. And I know what a "blue star pop" is.

ShaktisBoy 01-04-2015 08:20

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
The oarlocks feel a little lose but it really rows nice and i don't think you will need to modify it at all.


Sent from my iPad using Cruisers Sailing Forum

Mike OReilly 01-04-2015 08:26

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I row our 10' bote quite a lot. The sides do flex if you're pulling hard, but it's never been a problem. Flexing is a fact with botes. It seems to spook some people, but you'll get used to it. I have heard of some people replacing the oar locks with beefier options, and I might still do this, but so far I've not had the need.

Canibul 01-04-2015 08:32

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Flexing doesn't bother me at all. I've owned rubber bottomed Zodiacs with pop up floorboards that were like rowing a waterbed. Two inflatable Hobie tandem kayaks. Flex city. Flew a weight shift ultralight. Scary flex. I also like to row, hard, and know that flex is wasted energy at that fulcrum. Not a big deal. It's not an issue of me being 'spooked' by flex. I invent things. can't help it. If a five foot boat hook with a 3D printed doo dad to attach between the sides under the oarlocks helped me row faster, it would make me giggle internally. That's all.

Mike OReilly 01-04-2015 08:50

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Canibul (Post 1790464)
Flexing doesn't bother me at all. I've owned rubber bottomed Zodiacs with pop up floorboards that were like rowing a waterbed. Two inflatable Hobie tandem kayaks. Flex city. Flew a weight shift ultralight. Scary flex. I also like to row, hard, and know that flex is wasted energy at that fulcrum. Not a big deal. It's not an issue of me being 'spooked' by flex. I invent things. can't help it. If a five foot boat hook with a 3D printed doo dad to attach between the sides under the oarlocks helped me row faster, it would make me giggle internally. That's all.

Good stuff. I'll be curious to see how you make out, and if you're able to improve things.

rwidman 01-04-2015 09:07

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Canibul (Post 1790423)
...................... On the rowing flex aspect of it, this is probably a stupid question from someone who doesn't know what he's talking about (me) because he's never seen a PB in person, but would something like a five foot section of PVC pipe across the boat, somehow attached between the oarlocks, stiffen that up somehow? A boathook, cut to length, perhaps?

Just curious. I've been studying the videos and see the flex. And I know what a "blue star pop" is.

Unless things have changed, it comes with a five foot "stick" to hold it open while you insert thee seats. You could just leave it in place.

But why not buy it and try rowing it first before you invent a solution to what may not be a problem?

Canibul 01-04-2015 09:59

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike OReilly (Post 1790486)
Good stuff. I'll be curious to see how you make out, and if you're able to improve things.

Will be a while. I'm not scheduled to be in the US anytime in the next few months. Not til Hurricane season, anyhow. Unless someone suddenly dies, gets married, wins a lottery. You know...those things that can suddenly generate itinerarial recomputations. We were in Cambridge MA for four days in mid winter, totally unplanned. It does happen. But unless I buy a new one, it might be November before I get my greasy mitts on a used one.

you've been rowing one..what do you think? Is the flex all athwartships? Those polypro sheets must have a little longitudinal stiffness. Idea struck me when I saw those people using that notched 2x4 or whatever it is to spread the gunwales. I know the seats stiffen it lower on the sides, but it looks like the oarlocks are unsupported up near the floppy edge part.

Mike OReilly 01-04-2015 10:22

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Canibul (Post 1790546)
you've been rowing one..what do you think? Is the flex all athwartships? Those polypro sheets must have a little longitudinal stiffness. Idea struck me when I saw those people using that notched 2x4 or whatever it is to spread the gunwales. I know the seats stiffen it lower on the sides, but it looks like the oarlocks are unsupported up near the floppy edge part.

OK, you've got me trying to recall the force vectors and material responses. I'm away from my bote until the water turns soft again. I won't get back at it till late June, otherwise I'd start experimenting. Watching a video of me rowing, it looks like the flex is all in the gunwales centred around the oar locks (no surprise there). I'd say the gunwales flex out, but also slightly down -- almost a rotational effect.

Distributing the force across more the gunwales would likely improve things. A rigid cross-beam member at the gunwale hight might help (rwidman's idea), but that might interfere with getting around in the bote. Not sure... You've got me thinking.

alctel 01-04-2015 10:23

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
My second hand bote didn't come with the helping stick, is it just a stick or does it have cut outs etc on it? How long is it?

I managed to get mine open solo on the deck of my boat, but it was quite a struggle, I can see how a prop stick would be a big help.

Mike OReilly 01-04-2015 10:32

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by alctel (Post 1790584)
My second hand bote didn't come with the helping stick, is it just a stick or does it have cut outs etc on it? How long is it?

I managed to get mine open solo on the deck of my boat, but it was quite a struggle, I can see how a prop stick would be a big help.

The stick is basically the beam width, with notches to fit over the gunwales. I can't tell you exactly how long it is b/c I long-ago lost mine. I don't think it's needed.

I just use one of the middle seat as the initial brace. My approach is get the brace/seat braced against the gunwale, pushing against the floatation foam. Then I push the bote open and wedge the seat in to keep it open. Doesn't matter where it lands since it's just the brace. I then put in the aft seat, and then go back to the middle seat (wedge) and place it into it's proper bracket.

The brace stick does the same job, but I found it would sometimes slip off the gunwales. In the end, I just found it easier and simpler to use the middle seat.

Canibul 01-04-2015 10:55

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
My idea was most specifically a rigid crossmember at the gunnel height, at the oarlocks. I was watching the notched stick videos, thinking about boarding over the floppy side, and then saw your comments about the oarlocks flexing under heavy rowing, etc. I have a mental image now of two brackets that slip over the gunwhales and a cross piece that pins into place to stiffen the whole boat up, for those times when you need it. Being able to reach into the boat with one hand and grab that cross piece in the middle might help boarding over the side. I know it can help to grab a thwart in the middle of a canoe to board, for example. Similar issues here.

I figure someone with access to a porta-bote will be trying this before I can get one. And here it is sunny today, 81 deg.F. 8 knots of wind at the moment...

ejlindahl 01-04-2015 12:28

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I noticed the flexing was more pronounced on a hot day. Rare for Seattle but always hot in the Caribbean.

I made a longitudinal stiffener out of a ~ 1" x ~2" aluminum box beam with a largish notch in the center for the oarlock. The beam was actually a stile from my salvaged sliding glass door frame. Its about 2' long and goes on the inboard side just under the black ~1" "pex pipe" stiffener that goes all the way around the boat. I had to cut out a little bit of the black flotation foam to make room for it. This longitudinal stiffener is centered on the oar lock. I don't have access to the bote right now and I forget the details but it sounds like you are capable of figuring out something along these lines if you want. I think it helps reduce the flex a bit but also spreads out the "point loading" or "point flexing" that occurs right at the metal oarlock. On hotter days this was a bit alarming to me but maybe its not a big deal. Their structural reputation and durability seems very good.

I think your idea of an athwartship stiffener may help as well. Obviously you will have to step over it to move about the boat. It probably ought to be securely fastened to the gunnels on each side as the flexing in and out will easily dislodge a simple "stick" wedged between the gunnels. But I would use a movable temporary stiffener to figure out exactly where the best place would be to place the final attachment points.

I find the hold open stick to be very helpful when assembling the bote. If I lost mine I would make another. Its actual dimensions are about 1" x 3", (not a 1x3 which is actually in the USA 3/4" x 2.5"). Its hardwood and with the thicker dimension both help to stiffen the board. An old growth tight grain fir 1" x 3" might be stiff enough, though. Stiffness in the board is important because there is significant tension force on the long board, especially in colder weather, that could cause a typical lumber yard, knotty, soft wood 1x3" to flex or break. A 1x3 or 1x4 is cheap though so you could try it and see if it works. I don't know how long the board is or how far apart the notches are but the website or Yahoo portabote group will have that info.

There are three notches in the board. One on each end and a third about a foot back from one end. The "set back notch" opens the boat a little less than needed. However, its easier to open it to this stage initially because the boat can be pretty stiff to open up, again, especially in cool weather. Then you reposition your hands and push the board further to open the boat the last foot. Whereupon you set the notches at each end of the board into the ~1" pex pipe "cap rail" the sits atop the gunnel. I suppose on the website or Yahoo group there are dimensions and good pictures of the board if you need to make your own.

rwidman 01-04-2015 12:39

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by alctel (Post 1790584)
My second hand bote didn't come with the helping stick, is it just a stick or does it have cut outs etc on it? How long is it?

I managed to get mine open solo on the deck of my boat, but it was quite a struggle, I can see how a prop stick would be a big help.

Set your boat up, then take a piece of 1" by 2" wood and cut it to the width of the boat at the widest part. Cut a semi circle in each end to match the round trim and you have your stick. The original has a notch a foot or so from one end, I suppose to prop it part way open and then get a better grip to open it all the way. The boat will be harder to open when new and harder to open when cold.

ctl411 01-04-2015 12:41

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
My 14 foot came with square tube along the sides.
Big improvement or our 12 foot individual seat mounts. Not sure if this was a "year" upgrade or size related.

jwcolby54 12-08-2015 10:57

Re: Porta Boat - Durability & Suitability
 
I am looking at a used 8' with a 4 HP engine. The 4HP is over weight for the 8' boat (55 lbs), not sure why the owner bought that. Will this be a problem? I can sell that engine and drop down to a 2hp I suppose.

I have a 33' and single hand it. I am trying to figure out how to get the motor off and the PB up on deck quickly and easily. I am ok with installing something like the NovaLift or similar crane. Or even dinghy davits on the back of the boats.

So my questions are:

1) when in port, can I just lift the PB with motor attached on a three point (bow / aft) rope / cable rig? I assume so on dingy davits. How about on a crane?

1a) Cranes don't seem to have much horizontal reach. Can they in fact lift a PB (with or without motor still attached) without banging the hull.

1b) Can they swing the PB over the lifelines?

2) How difficult is it to get the motor disconnected and up on deck using a crane or a block and winch.

2a) Difficulty getting a 55 lb motor up on some kind of mount and locked down?

2b) How do you lock down a motor to prevent theft?

3) Has anyone used the boom to do this (lifting / moving the motor)?

4) Difficulty getting it into the water once assembled.

5) If just hung in port, at night, what it the probability of theft.

6) if using a crane, is a crane at the back or the side better? If at the back, the motor is easier. At the side, getting the PB on deck is easier.


Please remember "single handed" which I will almost certainly be most of the time.

It seems like leaving the whole thing assembled with motor in place while in port is the only solution so a "hanging" method (that won't promote theft) is desired.

Sorry about all of the questions all at once, but this is a pretty complicated interconnected set of decisions to get a solution that works.


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