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-   -   Inflatable weight? (http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f117/inflatable-weight-63864.html)

sailstoo 09-07-2011 05:32

Inflatable weight?
 
Considering a small inflatable that I'll put a little 4hp, 38 lb., 2 cycle Merc on. Weight is the biggest factor as my back is not what it used to be. Minimum size is 9'. Freshwater use for < 6 months per year (I know...why bother?) Don't want a RIB as I don't have room on a 34' foredeck. Please help with Your recommendations for mfr? floor? weight? carrying capacity? Whatever else? Thanks

capngeo 09-07-2011 06:20

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
I have an Achillies Roll-up. will plane off with 3 adults aboard with a 9.9

Boat itself is about 75#

djmarchand 09-07-2011 06:33

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
Since your 4 hp won't plane anyway and you don't want an RIB (too heavy among other things), then a simple rollup floor (not airfloor- you don't need its planing capability) will work fine. For best life, consider Hypalon.

Go to defender.com and search. They will also send you a spreadsheet with all of their dinghys and motors listed with specs like weight. Easy to browse that way.

David

HopCar 09-07-2011 07:03

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
Take a look at the Avon Redcrest. It's a very well made dinghy, nine feet long and very light (48 lbs.) because it doesn't have a wood transom. Four horsepower or even less should be plenty of power.

zeehag 09-07-2011 07:08

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
i hd a nice avon roll up-- with hard transom so could take 6 hp engine-i used mine with a 3.5 hp nissan very successfully--- was easy to lift for me and was able to be stowed on deck under main mast-- wasnt 80 pounds--was less-- good dink. i will be saving for another or talking someone out of theirs before i hit caribean.....i am concerned about weight as i cannot lift a larger or heavier one-- my boat can tolerate the weight but i cannot..... gooodluck. another i wanted was a redcrest--make a good dink and hot tub--2 uses for it.....

Jim Cate 09-07-2011 10:54

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
In my personal experience the Redcrest isn't all that great a design. They are very durable for sure (or at least the old, pre Zodiac takeover ones were), but they are about the hardest of all inflatables to row. In fact, I suspect that they are largely responsible for the pervasive idea that inflatables can't be rowed. I think that it is because of the flat, unsupported bottom, small diameter tubes, high friction rowlock design and fairly short oars, but whatever the cause, they row like pigs.

So, then you hang a motor on their poorly designed add-on motor mount. On the one that I had, this applied a lot of torque to the tubes which distorted the shape even more and tended to drive the already low bow under any oncoming ripple, dousing anything in the boat. Grrr!

IMO, any of the smaller roll-ups would do you well... those with a rigid transom on which to hang your motor, and at least a little vee to the bottom. In your application the added expense of Hypalon is not likely justified, but will extend the lifetime over PVC.

There are lots of dinghies out there now... kinda a hard choice, so good luck.

Cheers,

Jim

David_Old_Jersey 09-07-2011 13:38

Re: Inflatable weight?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Cate (Post 725218)
In my personal experience the Redcrest isn't all that great a design. They are very durable for sure (or at least the old, pre Zodiac takeover ones were), but they are about the hardest of all inflatables to row. In fact, I suspect that they are largely responsible for the pervasive idea that inflatables can't be rowed. I think that it is because of the flat, unsupported bottom, small diameter tubes, high friction rowlock design and fairly short oars, but whatever the cause, they row like pigs.

I disagree :p The "secret" is decent sized oars (length, blade and diameter of shaft :whistling:) - the old style one piece wooden ones not anything lightweight aluminium. And being prepared to put some effort in also helps :thumb:, once moving (and not overloaded) a 9 foot will row at a fair lick. Having said all that I wouldn't use one for a rowing a mile or 2..........

In regards to transportability, a 9 foot Avon will fit on a shoulder (without engine :p).....even for someone (? :whistling:) who is not very fit - just have to be careful with crosswinds :D


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