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-   -   School Me More on Bristol 27s (http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f47/school-me-more-on-bristol-27s-55673.html)

rowingdude 25-02-2011 07:25

School Me More on Bristol 27s
 
I apologize if this topic has been beat to death, but I'm looking for my first boat and I've come across a boat in Maryland with no engine. The owner claims the hull and deck are in decent shape, the running rigging may need to be serviced, and the whole boat/sails need a bath. Besides these issues, I understand that the B27 is an decent offshore pocket cruiser and I'm hoping this also translates to forgiving for a beginner. Thanks!

Bash 25-02-2011 07:45

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Is the engine it's missing an outboard or an inboard? Bristol made 27'boats that went both ways.

rowingdude 25-02-2011 07:51

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
I think it is an outboard. Here's the eBay item number:

BRISTOL 27 PROJECT eBay item 280633392509

rowingdude 25-02-2011 07:51

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
It's the outboard model

boatman61 25-02-2011 07:55

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Thats a plus... simple and relatively cheap to re-engine... a 5-9hp should be adequate... they're a nice boat and if structurally sound could serve you well for quite a few years..

rowingdude 25-02-2011 07:57

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Thanks so much Boatman. I'll go ahead and enter a bid for the ship. I guess my only real concern is going to be power generation now. As I have a collection of small amateur radios I'd like to use while underway.

Bash 25-02-2011 08:03

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
ask the owner how old the standing rigging is. That will tell you a great deal about how much TLC the boat will need before you sail it with confidence, especially if his response is a blank stare.

Bristols are lovely boats, but I'm under the impression that you have to join some sort of cult before you're allowed to own one. One of our Mods has a Bristol in Maryland, perhaps he can walk you through the initiation rituals.

Frank?

rowingdude 25-02-2011 08:09

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Well, he told me that the running rigging may need to be serviced. I'm not really put off by this news at the price this boat's currently sitting at, but the biggest issue is that I am in Michigan and the boat is in MD. Besides the distance thing, I'm guessing the whole interior will need to be "gone over".. I guess I was looking for a vote of confidence towards Bristol's unwavering commitment to solid boats.

Bash 25-02-2011 08:24

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rowingdude (Post 628298)
Well, he told me that the running rigging may need to be serviced.

You don't really "service" running rigging. You replace it. Same with standing rigging. Running rigging needs to be replaced more frequently than standing rigging.

Again, ask the owner when the last time the standing rigging was replaced. That will give you a better idea how much of a deal you're really getting. The combined cost of a new engine, new interior cushions, new rigging, and transporting the boat to Michigan will probably cost you more than the purchase price of the boat, but that's your real cost of taking this boat sailing.

Sometimes "nearly free" boats end up costing their owners much more than boats that would have sold for more. You'll understand this once you start pricing long-shaft outboards.

boatman61 25-02-2011 08:25

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
I assume your talking 12v power...
If so there's several ways...
1/ The outboard could be fitted with a generator and wired to your batteries
2/ Solar panels...
3/ Wind generator...
A combination of 1 and 2 or 1 and 3 would be best... at 27ft doubt you'll need all three

FrankZ 25-02-2011 08:28

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bash (Post 628295)
ask the owner how old the standing rigging is. That will tell you a great deal about how much TLC the boat will need before you sail it with confidence, especially if his response is a blank stare.

Bristols are lovely boats, but I'm under the impression that you have to join some sort of cult before you're allowed to own one. One of our Mods has a Bristol in Maryland, perhaps he can walk you through the initiation rituals.

Frank?


Oh all that is secret and you won't be told until your sworn in with blood... and of course a good bottle of rum for the mod that explains it. :D

rowingdude 25-02-2011 08:37

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bash (Post 628314)
You don't really "service" running rigging. You replace it. Same with standing rigging. Running rigging needs to be replaced more frequently than standing rigging.

Again, ask the owner when the last time the standing rigging was replaced. That will give you a better idea how much of a deal you're really getting. The combined cost of a new engine, new interior cushions, new rigging, and transporting the boat to Michigan will probably cost you more than the purchase price of the boat, but that's your real cost of taking this boat sailing.

Sometimes "nearly free" boats end up costing their owners much more than boats that would have sold for more. You'll understand this once you start pricing long-shaft outboards.

I wouldn't be transporting it to MI. That would be excessively expensive. I'd to go it and pay the storage fee while I cleaned the boat. I just got off the phone with the guy and here's what I learned: Running rigging 8-10 years (needs replacing) Standing rigging “Excellent condition” – SS Wire Keel is in great shape Top side needs wash + paint “Pretty solid” hull and deck, fiber glass has no soft spots Interior needs to be cleaned out and pressure washed, lighting and comms need to be replaced.

tartansail 25-02-2011 08:37

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
We previously owned a Bristol 27 with an outboard in the cutty. They are pretty bulletproof boats that can handle much worse conditions than I was inclined to be out in. Their underbody makes for a very comfortable motion for such a small boat. Obviously, you won't win any races, but you aren't looking at a B27 for speed anyway. You'll get lots of compliments while enjoying sundowners on the hook. Negatives for us:

They are wet. Waves have an easy time finding their way aboard. Part of the seakindly motion seemed to involve going through, rather than over, waves. A dodger is a possibility, but takes up a lot of the limited space.

The outboard is fine for getting on an off a mooring and moving in protected waters. As Boatman said, repowering is a piece of cake. However, don't expect to use the outboard to go to weather if there is any sea. The boat will hobbyhorse and the outboard will be pushing air.

Space below is tight for longterm cruising. We found that we could do one activity at a time below decks -- cook, eat, sleep, use the head. I'm not sure I'd want to take one across an ocean unless I was singlehanding.

There is a secret handshake and an initiation rite, but if I say more I fear for my first born son. :flowers:

rowingdude 25-02-2011 08:48

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Tartan - I will be single handing, unless a dog counts as another person.

tartansail 25-02-2011 09:05

Re: School me more on Bristol 27s
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by rowingdude (Post 628332)
Tartan - I will be single handing, unless a dog counts as another person.

As a beginner's single-handing boat, the B27 is a good choice. The systems aboard are simple so you can focus on the sailing. We had a very rudimentary electric system, a handheld GPS and tillerpilot for navigation, a portapotty for elimination and a portable stove for cooking. All served well. As a beginner, it will allow you to focus on learning to sail the boat safely and well.


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