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Mike1956 30-01-2016 23:51

Age of the Tide
 
Mentioned in my recent thread Tidal Cycle.

There were a couple of explanations for age of the tide and both seemed to say the same but in different ways.

Would I be correct in thinking that if the declination of the Moon is South there would be no or little age of tide in the Southern ocean at the GP of the Moon?

Additionally is the age of the tide variable for a fixed location depending on factors such as Moon declination?

Mike

Reefmagnet 31-01-2016 02:29

Re: Age of the Tide
 
My understanding is the tide acts like a wave travelling at approx 800 miles per hour and with no other influence follows directly under the moon. The other side of the world has another bulge caused by centrifugal force of the earth and moon orbiting each other (think hammer thrower). It would seem to me that with no other influencing factors the high tide follows directly under the moon although the sun with it's reduced gravitational influence will add a vector to the tide which should add slight lead or lags. Like the wake of a boat, however, as we get further away to the sides of directly under the moon, the tide would lag. Add in obstacles (land) and seabed geography, and things start to go funky - e.g. shallow waters will slow the tidal wave but increase it's height.

Anyway, that's just my basic understanding which could be entirely wrong!

GordMay 31-01-2016 02:51

Re: Age of the Tide
 
https://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/pu.../glossary2.pdf

Mike1956 01-02-2016 00:17

Re: Age of the Tide
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reefmagnet (Post 2031780)
My understanding is the tide acts like a wave travelling at approx 800 miles per hour and with no other influence follows directly under the moon. The other side of the world has another bulge caused by centrifugal force of the earth and moon orbiting each other (think hammer thrower). It would seem to me that with no other influencing factors the high tide follows directly under the moon although the sun with it's reduced gravitational influence will add a vector to the tide which should add slight lead or lags. Like the wake of a boat, however, as we get further away to the sides of directly under the moon, the tide would lag. Add in obstacles (land) and seabed geography, and things start to go funky - e.g. shallow waters will slow the tidal wave but increase it's height.

Anyway, that's just my basic understanding which could be entirely wrong!

Thanks, Sounds perfectly reasonable to me.

Mike

Mike1956 01-02-2016 00:20

Re: Age of the Tide
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GordMay (Post 2031791)

Thanks GordMay,

Managed to follow the link but now realise I need some serious help!

In the glossary it makes clear that the "age of the tide" is same as "age of phase inequality" and a formula is given.

Mathematician needed please.

Mike


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