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-   -   Dingy-Tow (http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f117/dingy-tow-15216.html)

Billiam 13-05-2008 06:47

Dingy-Tow
 
does anybody have any experience with this product? It looks like a great idea.

Davron Marine Products (Dinghy-Tow)

S/V Breezin'

By Invitation 13-05-2008 07:56

I could see using it in calm waters but not in any kind of "sea".

mickmul 13-05-2008 09:00

I've got vane steering gear in the way in any case, but it seems pretty flimsy for the weather we get here. . . and would probably affect your average aft swimming ladder . .where is the lever pulleyed from? Half way up the backstay?

gonesail 13-05-2008 09:15

previous owner installed one on my boat but I have not used it yet. he sailed with a group to Cuba and claimed that his was one of the few boats NOT to loose their dingy in the bad weather they encountered.

Paul L 13-05-2008 10:05

I've used one on my boat for 4 years or so. When rigged correctly, they are not flimsy. For protected waters, I can sail with the outboard on the dink and raised by the dinghy-tow. If I think it is going to be at all rough or I am not in protected waters, I always take the outboard off. The dinghy-tow makes it very easy to mount and unmount the outboard. You just raise the dink till the outboard is next to the stern rail and lift it off. The dink offers very little water resistance, so it does not slow your boat while sailing, as it would if you towed it behind. You can handle much rougher conditions with the dinghy-tow than would be appropriate to just tow the dink with a line behind the boat. I've been in big seas and 30+ kts wind and not had any issues. I would not use it for any extended offshore passages. I did use it down the outside of Vancouver Island in PNW. All in all, I like it. It sure makes using the dink quick and easy.

Paul L

Paul L 13-05-2008 10:08

Quote:

Originally Posted by gonesail (Post 162392)
previous owner installed one on my boat but I have not used it yet. he sailed with a group to Cuba and claimed that his was one of the few boats NOT to loose their dingy in the bad weather they encountered.

Make sure you read the directions on how to set the control lines. It is important that you do things in the right order to get the dink tight and loaded properly.

Paul L

S/V Elusive 13-05-2008 14:27

I think that it would be more of problem with following seas than if normally towed. I can just see 500#s of sea, plus force, piling into the dink.

Paul L 13-05-2008 14:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by S/V Elusive (Post 162499)
I think that it would be more of problem with following seas than if normally towed. I can just see 500#s of sea, plus force, piling into the dink.

It hasn't been on my boat. The dink is held rigid to the boat, with the bow (at the far end), floating up. So waves do not have a lot of negative effect on it. If you were in a situation where you felt it was safe to tow the dinghy on a line, then you would be safer having it on a dinghy-tow. That doesn't mean that you should do ocean crossings with this thing.

Paul L

S/V Elusive 13-05-2008 14:57

Following seas are not a unique occurance to just ocean passages - The last time I came down the California Coast, I had 35 knots and 15 to 20 foot following breaking seas. I have the cleat out of my towed dinghy - I presumed the dinghy made it to Mexico before i did.

Paul L 14-05-2008 07:01

Quote:

Originally Posted by S/V Elusive (Post 162509)
Following seas are not a unique occurance to just ocean passages - The last time I came down the California Coast, I had 35 knots and 15 to 20 foot following breaking seas. I have the cleat out of my towed dinghy - I presumed the dinghy made it to Mexico before i did.

Exactly my point. The situation you describe is not appropriate for towing a dink, and it would also be not be appropriate for having one on a Dinghy-Tow.

Paul L

S/V Elusive 14-05-2008 08:09

Since those "situations" often come up with little warning or time, towing is probably NOT the preferred method of transporting your dinghy. I keep mine on deck now. I would think that any trip longer than an hour or so, in very sheltered conditions, would be the maximum you would want to tow a dink.

Samadhi V 14-05-2008 09:44

I notice that the pictures on the website all show flat calm water. I believe that this product is suited for conditions as illustrated on the website. I would NEVER have a dinghy being towed in any kind of sea.

S/V Elusive 14-05-2008 10:16

And, ya know, if you are ONLY going to tow a dink in those very calm waters and for a limited time, I would just use a couple of tow lines. (I NEVER tow with an outboard attached)

Paul L 14-05-2008 11:04

I guess it depends a lot on where you sail. Where I am, there is about 10,000 islands and anchorages between here and Alaska. I might drop my hook twice a day to check out different places. No way am I going to load and unload the dink on the foredeck that many times. Also, look at the crowd that commutes on the ICW. Another good spot for it. It is not appropriate for offshore - however you like to define it. I don't think dinghy davits are appropriate for these conditions either. Roll it up or deck store it.
Since it has very low drag, it does enable more and better sailing in the flaky conditions you find going up the Inside Passage.

Paul L

S/V Elusive 14-05-2008 11:55

Good points Paul - in your circumstances perhaps it is a better method.


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