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-   -   Installing New Lifelines (http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f116/installing-new-lifelines-132625.html)

Cap 12-09-2014 06:38

Installing New Lifelines
 
Hi All,

I'm having issues with the search function; for some reason it gives me everything, but what I'm looking for! Anyway, I'm getting ready to install some new lifelines on my boat and am looking for any information related to installing new lifelines; do's and don't's, would be very appreciated. I'm also looking to rent, or borrow a Nicopress crimp tool that will crimp the 3/16 stops. My boat is located in Aransas Pass, Texas.

Thanks...Jeff

HappyMdRSailor 12-09-2014 06:44

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Jeff...

Haven't done it yet, but soon I'm jumping on the Dyneema bus to happy town with everybody else... :D

gamayun 12-09-2014 18:06

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
I've been installing Dyneema Dux. If you go this route, Colligo has a video series that shows you exactly how to do the splices. I would not have figured it out from the written instructions. I'm using the "line terminators" rather than splicing the lines directly to the stanchions. These are an extra one-time cost, but I like the look better. It took me about 2 hours to get the first splice done (I'm a slow learner) and now I'm guessing they're taking about 15-20 min each. The Dux is the heat annealed Dyneema, which shrinks less than the regular type and it's stiffer so the bury part is pretty easy. I am using lashings on each end that are sacrificial. These would be replaced every couple of years and make it easier to tighten the lines periodically. It is estimated that the Dyneema should last about 10 years. I like it better overall because I can have spare material on hand, replace anything by myself, and not have to worry about a crimping tool or heavy wire. Notwithstanding the research I did that convinced me this would be a good way to go, but they just look way cool.

gamayun 12-09-2014 18:10

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
And if you go this route, make sure to buy a ceramic knife. Even a cheapo from Best Buy because regular kitchen knives, rigging knife, fish filet knife, and heavy duty scissors just won't cut it....

Ecos 12-09-2014 18:28

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Don't do the Nico Press thing. It's not salty and it's not very fine at all. If you take good measurements a rigging shop will make a beautiful set. If you are a "do it yourself" type the Amsteel type are interesting.

sapient sue 12-09-2014 21:44

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Hi, we just installed Dyneema life lines. They were cheaper, lighter and no more rust stains on washing - way to go. :thumb: Sue

Stumble 12-09-2014 23:25

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Dyneema all the way. I have been using them for seven years now in New Orleans, and they are still in like new shape.

Nico press lifelines are just a terrible idea for a lot of reasons.

boat_alexandra 13-09-2014 00:40

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
I use dynex dux standing rigging it's a great material.

I removed the lifelines because they aren't needed, get in the way, and can be a hazard if you rely on them and they fail. Much safer without them.

Jim Cate 13-09-2014 00:54

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Quote:

I removed the lifelines because they aren't needed, get in the way, and can be a hazard if you rely on them and they fail. Much safer without them.
Right! And one could make the same statement about brakes on an automobile...

No lifelines is (to me) a really bad idea. I think that many agree with me.

Oh yes, they do get in the way.. of you falling overboard!

And we've been using Dyneema 75 for some years now in our lifelines, think they are pretty good.

And Guy, just what is so damn bad about using wire with Nicopress sleeve terminals? Before Dyneema, they worked well for us for many years.

Jim

Ecos 13-09-2014 08:34

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
[QUOTE=Jim Cate;1627050
And Guy, just what is so damn bad about using wire with Nicopress sleeve terminals? Before Dyneema, they worked well for us for many years.

Jim[/QUOTE]

Just because you used them for years for lifelines on a boat does not change anything. I have been making Nicopress control cable terminations for years on small planes. It is not a question of strength. It's a great system when used in the appropriate place. As a hand line they suck unless you tape up the ends and you shouldn't do that. The crimp needs to be visible. Including the vinyl coating of lifeline cable in the crimp is also bogus if you want full strength. They just don't look right, the copper sleeves corrode, the end of the cable snags on anything (and yes a proper done crimp has a bit of cable exposed.)

Jim Cate 13-09-2014 14:04

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Guy (Post 1627269)
Just because you used them for years for lifelines on a boat does not change anything. I have been making Nicopress control cable terminations for years on small planes. It is not a question of strength. It's a great system when used in the appropriate place. As a hand line they suck unless you tape up the ends and you shouldn't do that. The crimp needs to be visible. Including the vinyl coating of lifeline cable in the crimp is also bogus if you want full strength. They just don't look right, the copper sleeves corrode, the end of the cable snags on anything (and yes a proper done crimp has a bit of cable exposed.)

Well, "just don't look right" isn't a very useful condemnation IMO! I'll agree that things can snag on the terminations, and that you shouldn't tape them up, but I never found that to be a terrible issue. And no one in their right mind uses the vinyl covered wire for lifelines... been disallowed by racing rules for years. I never had a problem with the sleeve corroding.

But you are entitled to your opinion, as I am to mine... and I like Dyneema these days for a whole host of reasons.

Jim

Ecos 13-09-2014 15:08

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
I also use Dyneema for the lifelines and am pretty happy too.

roverhi 13-09-2014 21:32

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Go down to your local rigger and dig through his take off wire. 1/4" should do just fine for lifelines. Cut out clean sections of wire for what you need on the life lines. Use Norseman/StaLok terminals to finish them off. Got 1/4" wire from the scrap pile at a boat yard for free when we launched our Westsail nearly 40 years ago. Used that wire for the lifelines and they are still on the boat and doing fine.

!/4" is so way over strength you could probably lose 25 of the 26 strands and it would still be stronger than the typical coated life line wire. It is large enough in diameter that it is skin friendly and doesn't need the additional diameter of a coating. Without the plastic coating, there is nothing to trap wire destroying electrolytes and hide deterioration of the wire. The uncoated wire wire won't get ugly and grungy like the coating on coated wire. Rigging wire almost always gets switched out because of the swages, work hardening of the wire where it joins the swage or just plain age. The rest of the wire is usually just fine. A quick inspection will eliminate any questionable sections.

Agree with you about the search function on this website, it sucks. Tried a search for something the other day using the exact words of the title of a thread i knew was in the archives. The file I was looking for was buried 4 pages down line on the search behind files that had nothing to do with what I was searching for. It was only because I knew the thread was there that i had the fortitude to plow through all the extraneous BS that the search engine loaded on before the one I was asking for.

Stumble 13-09-2014 23:44

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
For the cost of 1/4" end fittings for wire lifelines you can make up a set of dyneema ones, and a spare.

El Pinguino 14-09-2014 01:11

Re: Installing New Lifelines
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Cate (Post 1627050)
Right! And one could make the same statement about brakes on an automobile...

No lifelines is (to me) a really bad idea. I think that many agree with me.

Oh yes, they do get in the way.. of you falling overboard!


Jim

Horses for courses.... my Vertue ( 25 foot ) never had lifelines when I owned her...narrow side decks and she tended to have a bit of tilt when on the wind .. they would have been a pest.... present boat, 39 foot... diff'rent story.

I have wire... made off at the after end/back of the boat with string/small stuff/ skinny rope bits ( pick your terminology).

Replaced about 8 years ago... one of the original ones failed under load at the swage, probably original and 20 yo. at the time. Luckily the load wasn't me.....


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