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ksmith 01-11-2007 19:35

Drainage
 
In trying to discover a reason for the lack of drainage from one of the cockpit scubbers. I was confused to see all the drainage including the bilge pump going to a thru-hull. Even more confusing was that all the scubbers are tied in to thru-hulls. My experince has been that cockpit drainage goes out the back above the water line and bilge pumps drain above the waterline as well. Oddly enough all seem to work but one. There are four in the cockpit and 2 each on the port and starboard decks.

Short term I plan to start at the one which does not drain and work back, any cautions or experience with this would be appreicated.

My boat is a 1970 27' Tartan.

David M 01-11-2007 19:58

Having a drain above the waterline is one less opening which opens you up to flooding below the waterline. The only outlet you don't want above the waterline is the head outlet.

Bilge pumps should always drain above the waterline.

delmarrey 01-11-2007 23:12

1 Attachment(s)
Cockpit drains below the waterline is what sinks boats. Especially in the North country.

Just like David said, the only outlet below the water should be the head and that is for sanitary reasons. And it should have a seacock which is shut off when the boat is not occupied, as well as the other under water fittings.

I do have a sink drain straight down only because the sink is only 1' above the water line so I don't have a choice. But the valve gets exercise regularly.

One problem with under water fittings is that sea life likes to make their homes in there. I keep my boat on the hard most of the time but even the last time out for a 3 day weekend I had sea creatures trying to make a home in my head inlet. They got caught up in a stainer.

David M 02-11-2007 08:52

Another thing...exercise your plastic valves frequently...they they tend to seize up more frequently from non-use than metal valves.

ksmith 02-11-2007 18:55

Many Thanks
 
Kind of thought I was on the right track. Had a chance to do some searching on previous posting after my question ( I get impatiance some times) In doing some research at the slip an oldbe advised when you pull her out get rid of the ones you do not want maybe keep the one for the engine feed in case someone wants to repower and thats it.


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