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Old 21-12-2008, 11:34   #121
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Sometimes hard to tell the difference between yelling TO someone and yelling AT someone.
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Old 21-12-2008, 12:54   #122
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Originally Posted by Agur's Wish View Post
By the way, how do all the single-handers do it? Docking, that is.
First of all, I never dock where I absolutely need two people. I guess that's pretty obvious but worth saying.

What I do is have all my dock lines set up ahead of time. I have the eyes hanging off the lifelines or the toerail ahead of time with the bitter end secured to the cleats. I put the boat along side the dock, step off and start putting the eyes on the dock cleats. I usually take a line with me that is cleated to the boat and go for a specific dock cleat first. This way there is no way the boat will get away without me onboard. I get back on the boat and tighten up on the docklines so the boat is sitting properly to the dock
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Old 22-12-2008, 11:57   #123
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First of all, I never dock where I absolutely need two people. I guess that's pretty obvious but worth saying.

What I do is have all my dock lines set up ahead of time. I have the eyes hanging off the lifelines or the toerail ahead of time with the bitter end secured to the cleats. I put the boat along side the dock, step off and start putting the eyes on the dock cleats. I usually take a line with me that is cleated to the boat and go for a specific dock cleat first. This way there is no way the boat will get away without me onboard. I get back on the boat and tighten up on the docklines so the boat is sitting properly to the dock
You sound nicely organised - I do the same - but I wonder how that would work with a strong wind driving you away from the dock.

In such a case I am always grateful for some help from someone willing and preferably somewhere above utter incompetence, standing in the vicinity.

Help is also appreciated for a Mediterranean mooring in strong wind/waves.

If there is no help, I just make do with careful strategy depending on the conditions. My extra long reach - stern platform and gangway spanning a little over 4 meters - is a mixed blessing.

Its usefulness once I am tied up, more than compensates for the extra distance I have to cover to get to the dock attachment point (bollard, ring, whatever..)
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Old 22-12-2008, 12:05   #124
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You sound nicely organised - I do the same - but I wonder how that would work with a strong wind driving you away from the dock.
I have a twin screw boat so I can cheat a little. I walk the boat sideways into the dock. With some way on there is some water to leeward which is moving with the boat so it tends to hold me against the dock for five or ten seconds...enough time to get off the boat and drop a line (usually a breast line) over a cleat.

If this is not going to work then it comes under the caveat of not attempting a docking which requires two people.
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Old 23-12-2008, 01:16   #125
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Originally Posted by David M View Post
I have a twin screw boat so I can cheat a little. I walk the boat sideways into the dock. With some way on there is some water to leeward which is moving with the boat so it tends to hold me against the dock for five or ten seconds...enough time to get off the boat and drop a line (usually a breast line) over a cleat.

If this is not going to work then it comes under the caveat of not attempting a docking which requires two people.
Twin screw is a luxury - I suppose you have a power boat or is it a sailing catamaran?

I take the point of your caveat but it would not work for me when I have a boat full of tourists that already have their bags in their arms and are eager to go with visions of the beer at the nearby bar of the shower they are going to take at their hotel after a day sail, as soon as they see the dock.

At that point even the need for docklines is not a part of their reality.
Docklines? They seem irrelevant.
They just perceive an old man that cannot "park".
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Old 23-12-2008, 03:49   #126
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David:
While it’s wise to optimize your operating conditions, one must be prepared to deal with less than optimal conditions.
Your “rule” (of not attempting a docking which requires two people) reminds me of those drivers, who only park their car in large lots, where they can find a drive-through spot, never having to reverse (& heaven-forbid parallel parking).
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Old 23-12-2008, 05:29   #127
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David:
While it’s wise to optimize your operating conditions, one must be prepared to deal with less than optimal conditions.
--snip
.
i cant imagine any situation in which a solo sailor would need to dock under these circumstances. as rare as i feel a need to put my home anywhere near landlubbers hardware i've never been in such a diabolical urgent need to get ashore, that i couldnt drop the pick and take the dinghy ashore, never.. ytf would anyone on a yacht want to put it near land in less than optimal conditions?

gee if the water is rough why would you want your yacht bouncing off a wharf? dont you blokes have dinghies? dock in a storm? its like going for a caffe latte in a cyclone...

if you've got a mob of sea sick landlubbers on board, get rid of the buggers in your dinghy, sure as eggs they arent going to help clean up the mess and they definitely wont help repaint your boat when the hull has been scratched to blazes...

dock in rough weather? dinkum...

(totally off the the thread now)
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Old 23-12-2008, 09:29   #128
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From my experience if the skipper is a yeller, then the crew will start yelling. One of the race boats that I hesitantly crew on has this problem. The skipper micro manages every crew member. He is technically a good sailor spends heavily on the things to make his boat faster, but misses the X factor of a really good crew do to the fact that they are always looking over their shoulders. When a break down occurs all hell breaks loose with the crew, no way for a conversation or even get a simple task to get done as the ones that are yelling the loudest dominate. A example the last race I did with them I was trimming the main, we started to get knocked down flying a spin. I had blown the main sheet and asked the pit to blow the vang, no response as the fordeck was yelling and the pit was watching them, the result a roundup. Contrast that to a boat with a quiet crew and skipper they simply go about the business, sailing...much more pleasurable win or loose.
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Old 23-12-2008, 11:13   #129
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Overheard (how could I miss it!!) yesterday from a small sailboat anchoring about 50yds hehind me in Marigot Bay in St Martin.....
The couple were americans and in their middle 60's by the look of them which made it all the more shocking from someone their age.......these people were YELLING!!!!......

Husband: "Come on..get the f#$%&#ing chain on the damn roller before it's too late" "Now look...it's too f$%#^%$#ing late...I f^$&#%$ing told you....now look at it"
Her response: "G%$dammit SHUT THE F#$@$ UP!!!!!!!!!"

I thought it was kind of sad really....to hear and see that level of disrespect between a couple....guess it works for them though......
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Old 25-12-2008, 19:27   #130
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A little off topic but we just finished racing in the J24 Nationals (3rd thank you very much) and one often hears about skippers that yell vs. skippers that don't. Skippers that don't yell have boats that are way more fun to sail on. However it's competition so a certain amount of passion is going on as well.

Our skipper was a yeller, but he is awesomely experienced which is why I sailed with him. I learned a ton. He would explode over line wraps, missed calls, not so perfect spinnaker sets and so forth.

I must say in a way it is motivational and as the skip he has the right to manage the boat. Unfortunately he would yell stuff like, "For <expletives> sake what the <expletive> is wrong with you." rather than the right kind of yelling which is stuff like, "Grind, grind, Grind." and "Go, Go Go." And "Faster, faster faster" and "Watch out for the bo...." (smack, splash) - LOL.

While there is certainly a huge space in sailing for yelling, I'd say for 99% of cruising it's uncalled for.
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Old 25-12-2008, 21:09   #131
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangiroo View Post
Overheard (how could I miss it!!) yesterday from a small sailboat anchoring about 50yds hehind me in Marigot Bay in St Martin.....
The couple were americans and in their middle 60's by the look of them which made it all the more shocking from someone their age.......these people were YELLING!!!!......

Husband: "Come on..get the f#$%&#ing chain on the damn roller before it's too late" "Now look...it's too f$%#^%$#ing late...I f^$&#%$ing told you....now look at it"
Her response: "G%$dammit SHUT THE F#$@$ UP!!!!!!!!!"

I thought it was kind of sad really....to hear and see that level of disrespect between a couple....guess it works for them though......

I remember them well…. They had a boat called SV Tourettes …and their kids had just come back from this camp


Lovely family but a bit hard on the locals....
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Old 26-12-2008, 06:26   #132
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Pelagic,

I think people should know that Tourette's syndrome is a medical condition that can in severe cases cause the sufferer to involuntarily utter obscenities, a "verbal tic" called coprolalia. A fellow that I went to high school with had Tourette's, though not severe enough to include coprolalia.
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Old 26-12-2008, 15:33   #133
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That is what I have, but only when I am mad, severly stressed, or am losing control. Just a normal symptom of a part of life.
Some are not affected.
Would love some of your genes.
How to trade?
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Old 29-05-2009, 23:46   #134
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Wayalan, it sounds like Lisa is a lucky girl.

I dont stand for guys yelling at me or indeed being vulgar, sexist or defamatory.

Just remember, honey catches more flies than vinegar and yelling is counter productive
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Old 31-05-2009, 07:06   #135
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I "Yell"at he outboard (Often) I yell at the anchor for floating ocasionally on top of the reed grass, I yell at the dog for various reasons, mostly because she is 100 yds away befor I know it, . I let the cheap P.O.S bilge switch know whatI think of it when it fails to work as needed.

I do not yell at my wife. 1. She carries a knife. 2. We have both learned to face the other when giving /recieving verbal commands (ie Drop it now!, Let go the spring line! etc) especially with a few knots of wind blowing accross the deck.

She will on ocassion yell softly at me. This is because the *!/.@#% outboard cannot yell back.
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