Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 16-02-2010, 09:40   #46
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,594
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatman61 View Post
Never had one .... never will.....
There's some ancient chinese/japanese proverb about the upright tree which is broken but the bamboo which bows to the force stands up again when it passes.... sounds good sense to me....
I go with the flow..
And that's exactly what a drogue allows you to do without the fear of being pitch poled, all while staying below.. That's a drogue off the stern while running.., not a sea anchor off the bow while stopped..
__________________

__________________
Randy

Cape Dory 25D Seraph
rtbates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-02-2010, 14:30   #47
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 13,649
Images: 3
My experience , in modern shallow canoe hulls, is that heaving to, is not a viable alternative, In every case that I could heave to , I also could have sailed on. I find that modern boats lie too far off the wind and either get hit broadside, get gybed or get tacked by the waves and sail off.

I find forereaching to be very effective and can often be done under autopilot and low engine revs and puts very little strain on the watch. Running off with wraps or drouges also works , but its a big strain on the crew, especially in the dark.
__________________

__________________
goboatingnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-02-2010, 16:32   #48
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,748
Well, the ocean has awesome power, and I doubt that there is any experienced sailor in the world who has not been terrified by this power at one time or another.

It's true that with reasonable skill and equipment and attention you are unlikely any more to be surprised by a hurricane which snuck up on you. But if you sail in blue water out of sight of land you will certainly get caught in storms from time to time.

So cruising is not indeed a warm fuzzy comfortable sport devoid of risks or dangers, like sitting comfortably in your living room. Maybe not as much as mountain climbing or skydiving, but you need to have a certain personality to like it, a certain amount of physical courage and resourcefulness, ability to handle stress, and figure out by yourself how to solve problems (including gear failures at sea).

That being said, it's not actually all that dangerous, statistically speaking, and that same awesome power is also fabulous and exhilirating, while being also terrifying. It is a huge rush, and a main reason to go to sea; many of us (including me) would not do it if you only had sunshine and 15-knot breezes. Part of the satisfaction of the sport is being able to handle it, and live up to the ocean's challenge. Did I mention how unbelievably beautiful the ocean is, in all kinds of weather, maybe even more beautiful in bad weather?
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-03-2010, 06:19   #49
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,206
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherT34C View Post
I always thougt it was when they started talking back that it was time to worry...
I never speak... unless spoken to first...
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2010, 15:17   #50
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Morlaix Brittany France blog: theguerns.blogspot.com
Boat: Colvic Watson/32ft/Feels Good
Posts: 461
Images: 4
Send a message via Skype™ to feelsgood
In 55 years of sailing I have only been scared of teh sea and what nature can throw at me but in thos 2 times I lived more than at any other time in my life. These are the tests in life that give us the oppertunity to grow and learn and most of the time nature is so kind as to let us live to learn another day
__________________
feelsgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2010, 17:24   #51
Registered User
 
Eleven's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Southampton UK
Boat: Jaguar 22 mono called Arfur.
Posts: 1,220
Images: 3
All my reading suggests controlling boat speed, not parking, and continuing with steerage way allowing avoiding nearby shipping, worse areas of weather and the distant lee shore.
Parking with a sea anchor depends on how the boat handles and what nature puts against it and how close that lee shore is.
Boat speed in strong winds, with a reliable forecast, can mean avoiding the 'dangerous segment' or making a safe harbour.
Maintaining an open mind is a survival technique, but carrying all of the kit you might need can also sink the boat.
__________________
Ex Prout 31 Sailor, Now it's a 22ft Jaguar called 'Arfur' here in sunny Southampton, UK.
A few places left in Quayside Marina and Kemps Marina.
Eleven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2010, 17:42   #52
Registered User

Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 68
I enjoyed Pat Henry's book and felt it was an interesting story about how SHE handled a sailing life. It was her story, about her life, the good and the bad.

She did have money issues, hell most cruisers do. Some writers use humour (Herb Payson for example) some writers never address it.

She deals very deeply about family, about relationships, about responsibilites, about guilt. But she writes about how SHE handled it- it's not a self-help book. It's not a book about how to circumnavigate, its about how she did it.

You don't have to like how she did it, you don't have to admire her life, but (I think) she deserves a hell of a lot of credit for what she did. Well done Pat Henry.

sue.
__________________
Ideologies separate us. Dreams and anguish bring us together.
Eugene Ionesco
susan kennedy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2010, 21:34   #53
Registered User
 
Stein's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Oslo, Norway
Boat: Sail mostly multis. Formula 18 Hobie Wild Cat and TRT 1200. Much else too.
Posts: 44
Wow! This is a nice thread! So nice I don't think I have much good to add. And me saying that, is NOT normal. (Anyone knowing me would call the doctor... "Stein must be seriously ill!" :-D)

But at least I can give my vote of approval to the above contributors. Sure the ocean is very capable of delivering dangers, fear and extreme discomfort. But the worst CAN be pretty well avoided by planning where you are at which times. Hurricanes are unpredictable things, but there are certain laws they never breach. Stay on the right side of Equator at the right season, and no real hurricane will hit you. But almost as bad weather still may.

Equally helpful in avoiding trouble is vast experience (preferably some more than a weekend course), reliable gear (boat and stuff) and avid attention to all sorts of signs, even those received by modern technical remedies... (And I don't mean Tarot cards.) :-) I generally notice that women have one disadvantage in learning boating. They tend to have less actual experience than men, but more importantly, they distrust the abilities they actually have. Men believe they can manage anything, which is helpful for trying and learning (but annoying to most others). Women also have at least one advantage: No fear of losing respect or damaging their pride, countrary to most men. This makes women listen properly, understand what it really means, and learn quicker.

And heavy weather strategies... well. There is definitely no single solution. Different boats behave differently, and different weather situations really are different. It's not so that a certain wind strenght in a given time will result in the one particular set of condition parameters. I've been in bad weather quite a number of times. Never two similar situations. One has to know ones own boat and have the remedies that suits it, and be experienced in employing those remedies. Never try to set a sea anchor for the first time in heavy weather! Very dangerous without prior practice.

Personally I prefer to use speed (mostly sail fast multis) to get where I want in the weather system. When it gets too heavy for comfort, I slow down totally (bare pole, but add tiny storm jib for steering balance if waves are especially difficult) and normally keep the wind about 45 degrees off the stern. When surfing gets too fast, I hang thick ropes in a long loop from one stern to the other to slow down slightly and make surface turbulence that will make wave tops brake a bit earlier and not land on top of us. If that's not enough, I add drogues. Maximum so far is three not too big ones of the cone type. Big ones, approaching sea anchors, I distrust as they are dangerous and difficult to operate due to huge loads. If it gets really hairy, proper helming is needed. (Off north Portugal once we averaged almost 15 knots with bare pole on a 40 foot cat. Max 55- 60 knots of wind, but the biggest waves I've ever seen. Proper mountains. Setting the 5,5 square metre/60 square foot storm jib, speed got to steady 20 knots plus. Got it down some with ropes and drogues. Still, too much! Heavy helming work and a bit scary that time.) The so called "series drogue" (a lot of very small drogues making up one long line of drogues) seems highly interesting. Haven't tried it though. But I will.

Bottom line for most cruisers is that the bad sides are such a diminutive part of it all. Long or short cruises are so totally dominated by what you put into them by your goals, your attitude and just you. The sharper edges and possible danger and discomfort is mostly a spicy contrast that makes you remember how deeply you appreciate every day. I really mean that. I know the value of a warm day, since I live in Norway. I also love the winter, since I remember missing wintery playfulness. Despite the shortcomings of a given harbour, you appreciate it for its safety, comfort and social life, as you remember the opposite might be close. You also love leaving it, because you know you will cherish coming back after having found new destinations. That sort of contrast is a never ending expansion of ones perspective.

Well. I did say quite a bit anyway, but as I see it, it's just what's already been said before here, presented in another wrapping: My overly wordy version. One thing that has been kinda said, but could be repeated more clearly: All forms of cruising, weekend, costal week trips, longer journeys, living aboard in distant waters or circumnavigations, contain possibilities of the marvelous beauty inherent in this passion we share here.

Very important: Do not let dreams of the adventurous big voyage diminish the pleasure you feel from any "smaller" cruising experience. Of course the biggest things have some colours the shorter trips lack, but some of my best moments on boats have been on two day trips... While you enjoy having distant dreams, live out other closer dreams. Suddenly the distant ones becomes close. That was my way in. Happy sailing!

Stein
__________________
I'd rather set my goals high and reach them, than set them low and fail.
Stein is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-03-2010, 21:40   #54
Registered User
 
DesertMermaid's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by susan kennedy View Post
I enjoyed Pat Henry's book and felt it was an interesting story about how SHE handled a sailing life. It was her story, about her life, the good and the bad.

She did have money issues, hell most cruisers do. Some writers use humour (Herb Payson for example) some writers never address it.

She deals very deeply about family, about relationships, about responsibilites, about guilt. But she writes about how SHE handled it- it's not a self-help book. It's not a book about how to circumnavigate, its about how she did it.

You don't have to like how she did it, you don't have to admire her life, but (I think) she deserves a hell of a lot of credit for what she did. Well done Pat Henry.

sue.
It was sad for me when I finished that book. I missed Pat Henry, her struggles and her fortitude. Her courage (and articulate technical skills) were exceptional and admirable.
Pat's book touched me deeply on several levels. I actually learned things about myself.
Most of all, I enjoyed her adventure.
Thank you Pat Henry for sharing your experience with us all!
__________________
DesertMermaid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-03-2010, 03:48   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Morlaix Brittany France blog: theguerns.blogspot.com
Boat: Colvic Watson/32ft/Feels Good
Posts: 461
Images: 4
Send a message via Skype™ to feelsgood
Pat Henry

Every Man should have a copy of Pat Henry's book on his boat I beleive it would help him understand ladies better I have read it and felt humbled. I was taught at a very early age that Pride comes before a fall and have never forgotten it. The thing I tell people atarting to sail is "it is the quality of the sailing that is important not the quantity" I think that just about sums sailing up
__________________
feelsgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2010, 09:47   #56
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
i figfure if i can stand 90+mph winds on a mooring in san diego ..lol..for real!!...then i can sail without a gizmo to prevent me from forward momentum...last storm we rode out here.......we were sooo tired of brisk winds---50+ kts..lol......doesnt look like any wind here, but the open areas were howling!!!!!
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04901.JPG
Views:	56
Size:	87.0 KB
ID:	14636   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04902.JPG
Views:	62
Size:	114.8 KB
ID:	14637  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04904.JPG
Views:	71
Size:	112.3 KB
ID:	14638   Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04903.JPG
Views:	65
Size:	74.9 KB
ID:	14639  

Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC04915.JPG
Views:	62
Size:	109.3 KB
ID:	14640  
zeehag is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2010, 13:26   #57
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Morlaix Brittany France blog: theguerns.blogspot.com
Boat: Colvic Watson/32ft/Feels Good
Posts: 461
Images: 4
Send a message via Skype™ to feelsgood
Get out there. Stop reading horror stories. Enjoy the sailing
In 50 years of sailing I have only seen about 5 true storms and was in a good yacht so a little scared but what the heck whats life without a few scary moments.
__________________
feelsgood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2010, 19:36   #58
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,206
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Everyone has their own idea of a storm and big sea's. for some its F5-6 and 7ft+ waves... for others its F7-8 and 12ft+ waves... others its F9 and 25ft+ waves...
My advice is wear brown trousers until you discover your maximum storm force limits... then launder and save for those "Special Days"... better safe than sorry
Oh.. and don't forget to whistle a 'Happy Tune'....
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2010, 09:22   #59
cat herder, extreme blacksheep
 
zeehag's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: furycame alley , tropics, mexico for now
Boat: 1976 FORMOSA yankee clipper 41
Posts: 17,770
Images: 56
Send a message via Yahoo to zeehag Send a message via Skype™ to zeehag
my idea of storms at sea are lightning storms--since last june when i started sailing with my sailing partner, we have had 2 weeks only that were without these lil monsters---lol the latest was yesterday----not all boats get hit bny the scary stuff--some manage to escape it--only the sea gods know why and who will get hit!! if ye wanna avoid the devils--donot sail in floriduh!!! LOL....just go out and sail--enjoy the wind that comes with the storms and the beauty after which is inimitable......
zeehag is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2010, 16:12   #60
Don't ask if you can't handle it
 
sailorboy1's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: On the boat somewhere
Boat: Hunter 410
Posts: 12,311
My idea of a storm is anything worst than what I've been in before. But since each time after it is over I say to myself "that wasn't so bad" the next time I'm willing to be out something a little worst. Guess this will continue till I get to that "holy ****" event and after I survive it I will back down.

I did a poll a few months ago, when it came right down to it most of us have not experienced the BIG storm and we probably spend too much time thinking about it. Probably doesn't help that when you tell people you plan to go cruising they respond with either the storm or the pirate question.
__________________

__________________
sailorboy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Worst Storms miketmbt The Sailor's Confessional 44 30-12-2009 00:29
Anchoring Techniques for Storms, Hurricanes and Cyclones Hud3 Anchoring & Mooring 45 25-05-2009 15:44
queensland storms. cooper Cruising News & Events 0 28-02-2008 22:33
West coast storms Randyonr3 Cruising News & Events 4 06-01-2008 21:39
lightning storms pete33458 Seamanship & Boat Handling 34 04-11-2007 19:49



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:29.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.