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Old 02-10-2007, 12:35   #16
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Dan, got your point for sure. I am sensitive to people approaching the dog uninvited for exactly the reason you state, we are trying to train her to behave better when she greets people.

We got her at 7 weeks of age and she had already learned that if she acted like an idiot when people came to the kennel they would pick her up and make a fuss over her. The more attention she could draw to herself the more likely it was someone would show her attention. So we have been trying for 5 years to overcome that early learned lesson and it is a chore. We ask people to not approach her unless we have her sitting quiet, and if she breaks they are to turn away and ignore her. Our friends think we're cruel and rarely comply, we think we're doing them and our dog a favour.
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Old 07-10-2007, 12:20   #17
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I don't approach any dog on a leash. Many owners only seem to have half an idea what their dog might do....and I like dogs.

It's the owners burden to tell people not to approach their dog...not the burden of the person who unwisely may be considering petting a strange dog on a leash. It's like a driver of a car saying to a pedestrian..."Don't you see my car?..then get out of my way!"
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Old 07-10-2007, 13:37   #18
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If your (restrained) animal sees new encounters with people as a fight or die situation – you have sadly failed that animal, and have no right to expose the public (nor that animal) to that natural (but unacceptable & illegal) response.

Quote:
Originally Posted by S/V Antares View Post
I had a Lab that did not need a leash. I could go in a bar and she would sit outside untied without moving for hours if I asked her to. Wish my wife would be that good...
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Originally Posted by Ex-Calif View Post
... My dog doesn't jump on people or sniff them up - Of course it is in their nature, that's why you train them...
... My dog will heel and then when I approach you and stop walking will sit next to me and ignore you - Like she was trained to do...
Will & Muffin (&Lucy) and Dan have it about right.

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...Many owners only seem to have half an idea what their dog might do...
It's the owners burden to tell people not to approach their dog...not the burden of the person who unwisely may be considering petting a strange dog on a leash....
David has it almost right. It’s the owner’s responsibility to ensure this their animal will behave appropriately in public.
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Old 23-10-2007, 04:41   #19
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its all about commonsense and thats is were it all falls apart. Owners need to take responsabilaty for THEIR PETS have them under control, clean up after them. Its not that hard, if you don't want to don't get a dog, have a pidgen as a pet
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Old 23-10-2007, 09:40   #20
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If you decide to put your dog on a lead...do it with a 6 foot or so SOLID leash.

As a yacht mechanic, I have been tripped more than once by those retractable leashes. Sometimes it seems that people are trolling with their dogs.

BTW I own a mutt that is part blond Lab and somethin small...gottem from "doggie death row" at the pound.....His coat is tight like a wire-haired terrier...or so the vet sez.....loves to retrieve

But PUH-LEEZE when you are coming up the pier---keep it short---let'em run when you get to the open areas

Your kidding right?

Might just be easier just to watch where your going
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Old 23-10-2007, 15:45   #21
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Might just be easier just to watch where your going
Might be easier for you (if you're the offending dog-walker); but the rest of the world will appreciate the courtesy of a SHORT leash.
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Old 23-10-2007, 17:24   #22
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If your (restrained) animal sees new encounters with people as a fight or die situation – you have sadly failed that animal, and have no right to expose the public (nor that animal) to that natural (but unacceptable & illegal) response.
I agree completely with your statement, Gord. And since I contributed the "fight or die" phrase to the discussion, I'd be remiss if I didn't explain myself better. I had written the following:
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As to the notion of approaching a dog on a leash without asking permission, I wouldn't recommend it either. From the dog's point-of-view, you are invading his/her territory. Furthermore, the dog feels trapped by the leash, so his "fight-or-flight" option is reduced to "fight-or-die." What's more, a dog may interpret your approach as a threat to "his" human at the other end of the leash, and react violently in defense.
What I had meant to convey was that a dog on a leash feels cornered, and if a stranger approaches, the dog may interpret that as aggression. Further, the dog may react aggressively to that because his option to flee is taken from him/her by the leash, therefore don't assume it is OK to approach a dog you don't know, and who doesn't know you.

Most dogs with even a modicum of socialization will not react that way, thankfully, but it is best to keep in mind that our four-legged friends have evolved from wolves, after all. What's more, dogs retain a collective memory of countless depredations visited upon the family Canidae by mankind.

A dog may even react aggressively if he is experiencing pain or discomfort for some reason. Most often, what many people call an "attack" is merely a warning display meant to strongly convey the message that the dog doesn't want his space invaded.

Most people correctly interpret the dog's message, especially if it's a harmless-looking little Shih Tzu. But when it's a Gran Canaria or a Rottweiler, for instance, real fear can be delivered along with the "back off" message, and the human ego doesn't take that well.

The correct approach is to ask the owner's permission to "invade" the dog's space and pet the animal. If permission is given, s-l-o-w-l-y present the back of your hand to the dog so that he can get a good whiff of your scent.

Do not hastily reach to stroke the top of the dog's head with your palm. Even a well-socialized dog may instinctively regard this as intent to strike a blow (see collective memory, above). Most dogs will duck away, but some may bite. This is your fault, not the dog's.

I hope this additional information more clearly imparts what I had meant to state.

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Old 24-10-2007, 00:32   #23
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About those long "trolling" leashes. I almost killed somebody's 10 pound rat dog last night because she had the leash stretched across the same bike path that I was riding my bike down. I did not see the black line until a few seconds before the leash line would have snapped the dogs neck or put the dog into my spokes as my bike frame hit the leash.

Don't get me wrong. I like dogs. I just don't like owners who do stupid pet tricks with their dogs..
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Old 24-10-2007, 01:00   #24
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RE: Patting a dog's head. This is not advised with a dog who doesn't know you. To dogs, dominance/submission messages are delivered, dog to dog, with the dominant dog putting his jaws/neck on top of the back of the other dog's head/neck. Reaching over a dog's head -- to the dog -- is often perceived not as a "let's be friends" pat, but a message of "I'm the boss, and you're not".

From a stranger, this is not welcomed. This is moreso if the dog has alpha tendencies. Alphas are likely to great these gestures as a challenge and may very well jump on the proffered hand/arm in an attempt to dominate it, by grabbing and pushing it down with the best tool they have; their jaws.

Despite their many fine characteristics that make them a joy to have in the family, us humans tend to forget that they really are a different species, with their own behavioral rules and expectations.

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Old 24-10-2007, 02:29   #25
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We trained our cat not to kill,even know she was decendant to tigers.I guess there are other ways for cats to cause problems?Butter wouldn't melt in thier......!

Anyone have problems with cats?.Mudnut.
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