Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 18-11-2009, 06:58   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
Boatbuilding Girls - Do You Want to Join ?

hi,
We are running a kind of sailing coop "sailing to middle kingdom" and in need for more participants. The boat is construced in Norway.
Will be finished by autumn next year.
We need more people to help sewing etc , (sails, interior etc)
The welding parts is soon finished.
Here are some pictures.
There are more pictures at 彩翼飞鸟_新浪博客

zeyang(at)laowai.no
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	01.jpg
Views:	1072
Size:	25.2 KB
ID:	11154   Click image for larger version

Name:	02.jpg
Views:	1076
Size:	99.3 KB
ID:	11155  

Click image for larger version

Name:	03.jpg
Views:	973
Size:	89.2 KB
ID:	11156  
__________________

__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 07:56   #2
Registered User
 
pressuredrop's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: West Palm Beach
Boat: Allied Seawind 30
Posts: 747
dont think too many of us here can decipher the website, but keep up the good work!
__________________

__________________
pressuredrop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 08:12   #3
Registered User
 
clausont's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Pacific NorthWest
Boat: Sold - Landlocked
Posts: 561
Images: 60
Here is part of the deciphered first blog entry on their website:
Choi Wing Asuka: Because everyone's comments to see that blog update was too slow, Lin quickly wrote the following letter to me. He was due to the shipbuilding, but also to repeat the work every day, so we do not often write I hope you bear with me.



Hey, everyone

We're sorry, blog updated very slowly. I usually spend all day on the ship, sailing for the early realization of my dream, there is no more energy to update your blog often, but I am very grateful to you can give me a message, I always try to read them.



Last week, the two girls to help me, this Tuesday there will be a 20-year-old Norwegian girl over, she said that she likes sailing, hopes to be able to peer with me. I hope that she can also enjoy shipbuilding. :-) The two girls, although not had such ship, but they learn quickly, done a great job. For me, have a friend who can help best, however, because dogs and cats every day and chat with a very dull monotone.



Now only two welded aluminum does not, then I can weld the ship's external. And then can ship was over, welding inside. After the ship's internal structure can be, as well as deck and mast, there is still a long way to go ah! ! !



The last coming in January, said that the Swedish girl, when she could wait a month to help me sail. This is really good, so the sail should be at least 200-300 hours it.

Rain this weekend, so the snow had melted, but soon will be another snow. Last year, under a lot of
__________________

clausont is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 08:38   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 9,862
Is this being welded together similar to a lapstrake hull or am I looking at it wrong?

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 08:48   #5
Senior Cruiser
 
Blue Stocking's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Georges, Bda
Boat: Rhodes Reliant 41ft
Posts: 4,022
You know the most heartening thing of this thread, is that in spite of the poor English grammar (not by you clausont, from the originator), we call all appreciate his passion, and admire his dedication
__________________
Blue Stocking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 10:06   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
Is this being welded together similar to a lapstrake hull or am I looking at it wrong?

Correct. You can easily see here.
its 8 mm aluminium alloy (5083) with 2 cm overlap. then will have t-bar formed frames on inside.
Maybe not normal way of building a boat, but we manage to keep a nice wineglass form and will avoid any hungry-horse look at the frames.

The girls think she looks very feminine even in metal :-)

zeyang
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	01.jpg
Views:	808
Size:	182.3 KB
ID:	11161  
__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 10:36   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: the golden state
Boat: pilot cutter
Posts: 289
I see an incredible amount of metal galling and pitting in the aluminum fittings on my boat, particularly where they are mated to stainless steel...to an alarming degree. It usually isn't visible on the surface, and is only evident when you take apart the mating surfaces, at which time you discover that the aluminum has been eaten away almost entirely where it has been in direct contact with stainless steel. In short, I'm not impressed with the durability of aluminum as a structural anything, let alone a hull, in a marine environment.
__________________
Not Sure is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 11:28   #8
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Sure View Post
I see an incredible amount of metal galling and pitting in the aluminum fittings on my boat, particularly where they are mated to stainless steel...to an alarming degree. It usually isn't visible on the surface, and is only evident when you take apart the mating surfaces, at which time you discover that the aluminum has been eaten away almost entirely where it has been in direct contact with stainless steel. In short, I'm not impressed with the durability of aluminum as a structural anything, let alone a hull, in a marine environment.

Electrolysis could be a problem with different metals. But today there is many big ships out there with alloy. many of the passanger cats are made in alloy.
What kind of alloy do you use?
Will try to keep dissimilar metals away from each other.



zeyang
__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 11:42   #9
Registered User
 
James S's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yemen & Lebanon... the sailboat is in Lebenon, the dhow is in Yemen
Boat: 1978 CT48 & 65ft Cargo Dhow
Posts: 5,811
Images: 139
Looks pretty cool to me...seems a very unusual method of construction.
Catchy tune!
__________________
James
S/V Arctic Lady
I love my boat, I can't afford not to!
James S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 12:13   #10
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: the golden state
Boat: pilot cutter
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeyang View Post
Electrolysis could be a problem with different metals. But today there is many big ships out there with alloy. many of the passanger cats are made in alloy.
What kind of alloy do you use?
Will try to keep dissimilar metals away from each other.



zeyang
I don't know what specific aluminum alloys they are. They're aluminum, and less noble than stainless apparently, so when they come into contact with stainless, they're toast around salt water. This was readily apparent on both my aluminum outboard motor mount assembly where the aluminum plates that the laminated plywood mount itself bolted to were severely pitted where they had been in contact with the stainless bolts, and also on an aluminum rudder plate assembly which was severely honeycombed on the entire underside where it was in contact with the rudder and stainless attachment bolts. These are all 'manufacturer installed' assemblies, so simply claiming that 'boat manufacturers do it' isn't an answer to the problem. My point is that zinc/galvanized seems to corrode uniformly and more readily apparent to visible examination, while aluminum appears to corrode in stealth mode, and where it can't be readily seen until the components are disassembled.
__________________
Not Sure is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 12:25   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Sure View Post
I don't know what specific aluminum alloys they are. They're aluminum, and less noble than stainless apparently, so when they come into contact with stainless, they're toast around salt water. This was readily apparent on both my aluminum outboard motor mount assembly where the aluminum plates that the laminated plywood mount itself bolted to were severely pitted where they had been in contact with the stainless bolts, and also on an aluminum rudder plate assembly which was severely honeycombed on the entire underside where it was in contact with the rudder and stainless attachment bolts. These are all 'manufacturer installed' assemblies, so simply claiming that 'boat manufacturers do it' isn't an answer to the problem. My point is that zinc/galvanized seems to corrode uniformly and more readily apparent to visible examination, while aluminum appears to corrode in stealth mode, and where it can't be readily seen until the components are disassembled.
Im not an alloy expert but ive seen and used 5083 alloy below water and in connection with stainless steel without any problem. Maybe the 4.5% Mg in 5083 makes its less prone to corrosion. Anyway i will watch closely and stay away from mixing metals. (Ill plan to use nylon in between where i cant avoid this).

But youre righ,t aluminium is less noble than many (most) other metals and should be treated carefully. But when treated correct I have a boat which hardly need any kind of upkeep, dont even need to paint it.


zeyang
__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 14:56   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: the golden state
Boat: pilot cutter
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeyang View Post
Im not an alloy expert but ive seen and used 5083 alloy below water and in connection with stainless steel without any problem. Maybe the 4.5% Mg in 5083 makes its less prone to corrosion. Anyway i will watch closely and stay away from mixing metals. (Ill plan to use nylon in between where i cant avoid this).

But youre righ,t aluminium is less noble than many (most) other metals and should be treated carefully. But when treated correct I have a boat which hardly need any kind of upkeep, dont even need to paint it.


zeyang
It sounds like you've got it covered then. Like I said, the surprising & disturbing part was that the severe corrosion/pitting/honeycombing of the aluminum parts wasn't apparent until the parts were disassembled and the mating surfaces examined. From the outside everything appeared 'normal', and sound. And that can add up to a sudden and catastrophic failure in the water.
__________________
Not Sure is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2009, 07:01   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 9,862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Sure View Post
I see an incredible amount of metal galling and pitting in the aluminum fittings on my boat, particularly where they are mated to stainless steel...to an alarming degree. It usually isn't visible on the surface, and is only evident when you take apart the mating surfaces, at which time you discover that the aluminum has been eaten away almost entirely where it has been in direct contact with stainless steel. In short, I'm not impressed with the durability of aluminum as a structural anything, let alone a hull, in a marine environment.
Aluminum when done correctly is very durable and very resistant to all the old problems that aluminum historically had such as electrolysis and stress cracks. There are tens of thousands of commercial and military vessels made of aluminum. The key phrase here is "when done correctly". No offense to anyone but in my opinion aluminum boat construction on a larger scale is not something that should be done by amateurs. There is a large learning curve to doing it right.
__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2009, 23:13   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by David M View Post
The key phrase here is "when done correctly". No offense to anyone but in my opinion aluminum boat construction on a larger scale is not something that should be done by amateurs. There is a large learning curve to doing it right.
Yes, welding alloy means a little more careful work than steel and more timeconsuming in preparation.
But amateurs dont run by the clock, and there are no customer hanging over their shoulder so i would say that an amateur with right equipment and some skill is basically doing as good job as a professional welder, but use 2-3 times as long to fix things up.
When an amateur has been welding his own boat, he gain one major thing: He knows the boat inside and out and know how to fix if somethings happens.

One more plank to cut and weld, then ready to work on the keelplank.

zeyang
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	01.jpg
Views:	633
Size:	211.9 KB
ID:	11202  
__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-11-2009, 23:25   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: 中国
Boat: Homemade double ender
Posts: 113
hehe. wrong picture. that was the dog trying to steal food from the cat without success.

here is the boatpicture.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	02.jpg
Views:	713
Size:	205.3 KB
ID:	11203  
__________________

__________________
zeyang is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Crew Available: Newbie Looking to Join a Crew from US (WC) December + Some Advice, Please PaulJack Crew Archives 11 09-09-2011 15:14
Which Sailing Club to Join in the San Francisco Area ? Maryamee General Sailing Forum 10 18-08-2011 13:48


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:39.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.