Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-10-2015, 21:13   #16
Registered User
 
oldragbaggers's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Wherever the boat is
Boat: Cape Dory 33
Posts: 1,019
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post

If it's a midsize do market it probably has older produce, canned goods, refrigerated stuff and I have no refrigerator, and then staples like rice and beans. There isn't anything I can do with that.

It's something I need to work on, I didn't do well in the past, was unable to stock up for foods for extended cruising,, was too tied to resupplying. So I really need ideas. I have no ideas what you guys eat.
Wow...you are really in a hard fix if you can't see what to do with rice and beans!! Those are the staples of my (very healthy) diet. I could totally live on oatmeal, brown rice (with beans), beans (all kinds), hummus (made from chickpeas), quinoa (with beans), homemade whole wheat flat bread (great with beans but also wonderful spread with peanut butter and drizzled with honey), canned veggies (corn goes great with quinoa and black beans), almond milk, shredded wheat and bran, bulgur wheat (note to self.....try it with beans)......13 bean soup (don't forget to pack the pressure cooker), baked beans (awesome on my meatless loaf) The fixins for cornbread, which you can make in a skillet, and goes great with.....you guessed it......beans. Ahhh yes, we do love beans. With all that protein for strength, fiber to keep things moving along, and carbs for energy they are the perfect food. And either canned or dry will keep for a long time. But if you're going to cook dried beans on a boat you'll need to be able to carry or make enough water to cook them in and you'll need to use a pressure cooker to conserve fuel.

Potatoes too, white or sweet, great nutrition and will keep longer than green vegetables. Pancake mixes and real maple syrup, rolls of polenta keep a long time, eggs keep without refrigeration for a good while too if you Vaseline the shells and turn them regularly. Whole grain pastas. Bring all kinds of canned stuff to make your sauces, tomato sauce, seasoned diced tomatoes, canned mushrooms and olives. I like to put spinach in my spaghetti sauce. I usually use fresh but don't see why canned wouldn't work in a pinch.

Supplement with fresh local veggies and fruit when you can get them and fresh fish or seafood when you can catch it. Make sure you have plenty of God's magic elixir (water) and you should be good to go!!
__________________

__________________
Southbound on the ICW

https://share.delorme.com/SVAnteris
oldragbaggers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 00:31   #17
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,815
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuM View Post
Vegemite and real coffee. Anything else I can make do with whatever is to hand.
You forgot chocolate .

SWL
__________________

__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 02:17   #18
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,815
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post
If anyone want to PM me a spreadsheet of what the stock up on, I am happy to have it.
Hi Northoceanbeach
Provisioning is daunting isn't it, particularly when you have no refrigeration.

It depends dramatically on what you enjoy eating, how much you are willing to change and whether or not you enjoy cooking or are prepared to learn. Simply reproducing someone else's list will not be very useful (FamilyVan would suffer on our boat with no Kimchi Noodles, as would Steady with no Spam ).

One way of going about it is to make a list of what YOU like to eat and are willing to prepare for brekkie, lunch and dinner, then stock up on these ingredients and add some favourite snacks/treats plus drinks.

To give you some idea of what keeps well on board for months/years without refrigeration, here are some of the long life provisions we keep.
I go through a fair bit of flour, as I make bread, pancakes, muffins, scones, biscuits, cookies etc. I also use heaps of oats to make granola, porridge, muesli, cookies and as a binding agent in rissoles. Some people would cruise happily with none.
You could use this list as a starting point though and see if there is stuff there you would enjoy both eating and cooking with:


LONG LIFE PROVISIONS
Items in blue forgotten and added later:

Chocolate

Breakfast cereal
Oats
Dried fruit (sultanas, cranberries, apricots, dates, prunes, goji berries)
Nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, brazil nuts, pistachio, cashews)
Seeds (sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, linseed, pine nuts)
Desiccated coconut

Long life milk (cow's, almond, soy)
Powdered milk

Peanut butter
Vegemite
Nutella
Jam, marmalade
Honey
Maple syrup

Coffee (ground and instant)
Tea (loose leaf and teabags)
Cocoa
Alcohol

Crackers (assortment)
Popcorn kernels

Spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, mixed spice, ginger, thyme, oregano, rosemary, curry powder, garam masala, cumin, coriander, cardamom, turmeric, bay leaves, paprika, sumac, chilli, allspice, fenugreek, mustard seeds, cayenne pepper, caraway, peppercorns)
Salt

Tomato sauce
Soy sauce
Oyster sauce
Sweet chilli sauce
Hot sauce
Horseradish
Wasabi
Pickled ginger
Worcestershire sauce
HP sauce
High quality extra virgin olive oil
Sesame oil
Fish sauce
Vinegar (balsamic, white, red)
Coconut milk
Capers
Olives
Sundried tomatoes
Chutney
Tahini
Mustard (Dijon, wholegrain)
Stock cubes

Rice (Basmati, arborio, brown, wild)
Pasta
Noodles
Quinoa
Whole wheat
Barley
Buckwheat
Cracked wheat

Chickpeas
Beans (eg navy, kidney, mung)
Lentils (red, brown, green)

Flour
Sugar (assorted)
Baking powder
Bicarb of soda
Yeast
Extracts (vanilla, almond, lemon)

Tinned tomatoes
Tinned tomato paste
Tinned corn
Tinned pineapple, apricots, peaches
Tinned tuna & salmon
Tinned anchovies
Tinned baked beans
(We carry no tinned meat, as we think it is revolting, but other cruisers stock up heavily)

Hope that helps .

SWL

PS Lots of vegetables keep well for weeks/months (eg potatoes, onions, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, cabbage, ginger, garlic). Apples and lemons store well too.
Eggs last if they are bought unrefrigerated. Coating them in vaseline may help.
Vacuum seal hard cheese for longevity. Parmesan will easily keep for months.
Some soft cheeses store well in brine or marinaded in oil.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 03:42   #19
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 11,455
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

SWL, that list is so very like ours that it is uncanny! I reckon I could make out well in your galley, and vice versa. Great minds and all that...

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II , lying Port Cygnet, Tasmania once again
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 04:07   #20
Registered User
 
northoceanbeach's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: California
Boat: Cape Dory 28
Posts: 445
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Can't forget chocolate. Even I know that.

Beans take soooo long to cook. And you have to soak them. Rice too. It takes a lot of fuel.
northoceanbeach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 05:03   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
StuM's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Port Moresby,Papua New Guinea
Boat: FP Belize Maestro 43
Posts: 6,713
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
SWL, that list is so very like ours that it is uncanny! I reckon I could make out well in your galley, and vice versa. Great minds and all that...

Jim
The only things missing are star anise and cloves in the spice list and HP sauce (assuming you have palm sugar in the assorted sugars) .
__________________
StuM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 06:26   #22
Registered User
 
oldragbaggers's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Wherever the boat is
Boat: Cape Dory 33
Posts: 1,019
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

SWL and Jim, I think we could all do well in each other's galleys. You won't find any vegemite (never had it before, can't get it here?) ir anchovies in mine, but other than that you'd be good to go.
__________________
Southbound on the ICW

https://share.delorme.com/SVAnteris
oldragbaggers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 07:36   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 184
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

You don't need help provisioning you need to take a basic home economics class as a starter. You need the basic skills. Then take some cooking classes. It wouldn't to have a " can do attitude " as well. If the first thing you think of when you hear " beans and rice " is " I can't do any thing with that " well you're going to be right
__________________
farm sail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 07:58   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto area when not cruising
Boat: Bristol 45.5
Posts: 668
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

I agree with others that the OP needs to learn some cooking skills and what he likes to eat from simple cookbooks designed for campers and backpackers since these recipes typically use a lot of rice and beans since they are fairly light to carry. We found that careful choice of fruits and vegetables will give healthy diet options for weeks after resupply. We did vaseline eggs but found that unrefrigerated eggs - the norm in most of the world last for several weeks. We had one go bad in four years.

If you want a western-style diet it can be very expensive in many places. You are better using local foods when possible - although in some places this means you better like starches. Local markets are often terrific. Some merchants will try to stick it to foreigners. My wife got in the habit of asking local shoppers how much something should cost. In more than a few cases, the local woman went around with us to the stalls to make sure we got fair prices.

It helps to know where the good supply points are. Panama City is incredible - wide selection and very cheap. The hypermarche in Papeete is the best supermarket I have ever seen anywhere with an incredible selection of interesting foods - but expensive. Basically any of the French places have good shopping. Australia is great but expensive; southern Indonesia is very cheap but you need to eat local - the sweet soy sauce, (kecap manis) is outstanding stuff that we use even in Canada. South Africa is almost as good but fairly cheap.


But learn to cook with staple foods - you need the food flexibility to use what you can find.
__________________
Still looking for our next boat. Have decided we want to have something that will keep us happy for the next 10 years or so. By then I will be pushing 80 and if i am still sailing that will be a very good thing.
AiniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:08   #25
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,815
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuM View Post
The only things missing are star anise and cloves in the spice list and HP sauce (assuming you have palm sugar in the assorted sugars) .
I forgot HP sauce .

Star anise is one spice I haven't explored.

Cloves are banned from the boat. They remind me of the dentist and I have a deep seated fear of dentists .

SWL
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:23   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
StuM's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Port Moresby,Papua New Guinea
Boat: FP Belize Maestro 43
Posts: 6,713
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by AiniA View Post
the sweet soy sauce, (kecap manis) is outstanding stuff that we use even in Canada. South Africa is almost as good but fairly cheap.
How could I forget that one? Just had chicken marinated in Kecap Manis for dinner! It's another essential for the sauce list - fried rice just isn't the same without it.
__________________
StuM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:26   #27
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,815
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
SWL, that list is so very like ours that it is uncanny! I reckon I could make out well in your galley, and vice versa. Great minds and all that...

Jim
Jim, I often think it is uncanny how alike we are compared to you and Ann .
I hope for your sake though that Ann does not get up to as much mischief as I do .

SWL
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:46   #28
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,815
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Quote:
Originally Posted by northoceanbeach View Post
Can't forget chocolate. Even I know that.

Beans take soooo long to cook. And you have to soak them. Rice too. It takes a lot of fuel.
Sorry for all the thread drift . Back on topic now.

Beans and chickpeas are easy peasy to cook and take next to no fuel and little effort.

Soaking is just a case of pouring some water over a mugful before you go to bed. How hard is that? Cooking is nearly as easy. In the morning just drain the beans, cover with water, bring to pressure (5 minutes?), turn off the heat and leave the pot sitting until you need to use the beans (a minimum of a couple of hours). If you are using an inexpensive pot that does not hold the pressure well, just bring it to pressure again an hour later. You will learn if this is necessary. Total labour time is not more than a minute, cooking time 5-10 minutes.

Beans can be used in countless ways, some of which OldRagBaggers has mentioned. Mash them and add flavourings to make great dips, marinate them in lemon juice and oil for a yummy snack, add them to soups, make rissoles with them, throw them in summer salads, use them in curries, chillies, Italian dishes .....
The options are limitless. They are a fantastic source of protein, inexpensive, lightweight, don't take up much room, keep for a couple of years and are readily available.

There is truly nothing time or energy consuming about cooking beans, you just need to plan ahead. You can't say "what will I have" minutes before dinner time.

SWL
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:57   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: W Carib
Boat: Wildcat 35, Hobie 33
Posts: 7,948
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

We prefer to provision fresh and locally when possible. Another opportunity to interact with the locals and eat what they eat....of course day 14 of rice, beans, and fish can get a little old. . Ate Cow Fish for the first time ever, in decades on the water, as a result of this practice (the Kuna indians in the San Blas eat them). Never even crossed my mind to eat one before. The Kuna half-jokingly call them "pesca-pollo"...because they taste like...CHICKEN!

We do vaccum bag a few things like spices. Vaccum bag in small quantities because once opened spices etc go bad fast in the tropics. We bought a huge bag of wasabi powder a few seasons ago, broke it down into smaller vaccum bags, still good.

We live in the Chiriqui highlands of Panama part of the year and get spoiled with the several varieties of great coffee grown here. So, we vaccum bag up large quantities of coffee too for each season. Despite all the great coffee grown in Central America, almost exclusively for export, what you find in the typical local tienda is instant, small packets of low grade coffee, or even worse "cafe de maize" (which is a cheap alternative to coffee composed of roasted corn mixed with a bit of coffee). The locals drink it laden with sugar....yeech.

Also experimenting with things to dehydrate and vaccum bag like peppers and tomatoes. There is a separate thread on this subject.
__________________
belizesailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2015, 08:59   #30
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cruising Indian Ocean / Red Sea - home is Zimbabwe
Boat: V45
Posts: 1,282
Re: What are essential foods to bring?

Ours is similar but would add Mrs Balls Chutney (the large plastic tubs), marmite, marmalade and tinned duck (French product) as well as Argentinian tinned whole hams.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaworthy Lass View Post
Hi Northoceanbeach
Provisioning is daunting isn't it, particularly when you have no refrigeration.

It depends dramatically on what you enjoy eating, how much you are willing to change and whether or not you enjoy cooking or are prepared to learn. Simply reproducing someone else's list will not be very useful (FamilyVan would suffer on our boat with no Kimchi Noodles, as would Steady with no Spam ).

One way of going about it is to make a list of what YOU like to eat and are willing to prepare for brekkie, lunch and dinner, then stock up on these ingredients and add some favourite snacks/treats plus drinks.

To give you some idea of what keeps well on board for months/years without refrigeration, here are some of the long life provisions we keep.
I go through a fair bit of flour, as I make bread, pancakes, muffins, scones, biscuits, cookies etc. I also use heaps of oats to make granola, porridge, muesli, cookies and as a binding agent in rissoles. Some people would cruise happily with none.
You could use this list as a starting point though and see if there is stuff there you would enjoy both eating and cooking with:


LONG LIFE PROVISIONS

Chocolate

Breakfast cereal
Oats
Dried fruit (sultanas, cranberries, apricots, dates, prunes, goji berries)
Nuts (almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, brazil nuts, pistachio, cashews)
Seeds (sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, linseed, pine nuts)
Desiccated coconut

Long life milk (cow's, almond, soy)
Powdered milk

Peanut butter
Vegemite
Nutella
Jam
Honey
Maple syrup

Coffee (ground and instant)
Tea (loose leaf and teabags)
Cocoa
Alcohol

Crackers (assortment)
Popcorn kernels

Spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, mixed spice, ginger, thyme, oregano, rosemary, curry powder, garam masala, cumin, coriander, cardamom, turmeric, bay leaves, paprika, sumac, chilli, allspice, fenugreek, mustard seeds, cayenne pepper, caraway, peppercorns)
Salt

Tomato sauce
Soy sauce
Oyster sauce
Sweet chilli sauce
Hot sauce
Horseradish
Wasabi
Pickled ginger
Worcestershire sauce
High quality extra virgin olive oil
Sesame oil
Fish sauce
Vinegar (balsamic, white, red)
Coconut milk
Capers
Olives
Sundried tomatoes
Chutney
Tahini
Mustard (Dijon, wholegrain)
Stock cubes

Rice (Basmati, arborio, brown, wild)
Pasta
Noodles
Quinoa
Whole wheat
Barley
Buckwheat
Cracked wheat

Chickpeas
Beans (eg navy, kidney, mung)
Lentils (red, brown, green)

Flour
Sugar (assorted)
Baking powder
Bicarb of soda
Yeast
Extracts (vanilla, almond, lemon)

Tinned tomatoes
Tinned tomato paste
Tinned corn
Tinned pineapple, apricots, peaches
Tinned tuna & salmon
Tinned anchovies
Tinned baked beans
(We carry no tinned meat, as we think it is revolting, but other cruisers stock up heavily)

Hope that helps .

SWL

PS Lots of vegetables keep well for weeks/months (eg potatoes, onions, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, cabbage, ginger, garlic). Apples and lemons store well too.
Eggs last if they are bought unrefrigerated. Coating them in vaseline may help.
Vacuum seal hard cheese for longevity. Parmesan will easily keep for months.
Some soft cheeses store well in brine or marinaded in oil.
__________________

__________________
Bulawayo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The Most Basic Essential Foods Ofer Provisioning: Food & Drink 466 17-04-2013 15:41
Essential Vessel Statistics knottybuoyz Powered Boats 5 14-11-2006 21:40



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:24.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.