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Old 05-02-2010, 10:44   #31
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I´m still finding occasionally from 4 years ago onboard, so maybe don´t go too mad. If you´re head to south america then most staples will be much cheaper there anyway. Singlehanded I find that I eat street food more often than cooking onboard, certainly north from Brasil and now in Trinidad. I couldn´t make food like that for that price onboard and certainly not as tasty. Though after getting hooked on roti´s and doubles here chickpeas are leaping up the onboard popularity chart when anchored away from roti stands, curried in a pressure cooker.
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Old 05-02-2010, 10:54   #32
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Now it starts getting fun. Nonfat milk is fine (it will last longer) If it tastes good to you...Yes you can cook with olive oil- but it is a bit expensive. If your going to fry stuff you may want cheaper vege oil. I like olive oil because I like the taste...I use Balsamic Vinegar for the same reason...Are we seeing a trend here? Get what tastes good! BTW- where is your beans for sprouting? And a bottle of clorox- your going to love that in Mexico.
I would still recommend what was said above- plan a few weeks worth of meals so you know how much to get of everything.
just checked into the sprouting business. I AM GOING TO LOVE IT! thanks for the suggestion.

Can Balsamic vinegar be the only vinegar I carry?
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Old 05-02-2010, 11:23   #33
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About the weight of cans: how much fresh water are you going to carry with you? Do you have a watermaker? If not and your tankage is limited, remember that a can of stock needs no or less added water for that soup. It doesn't really matter if you carry that weight in your water tank or jerry jug or in the form of cans.cheers,
Nick.
I though about this a bunch and decided to get a water maker(40GPD).

Products - Katadyn Products Inc.

I believe this will aid me in weight savings. That's the reason I like to carry as little liquids of any kind. I am trying to go with as much dry basic foods and add water as needed. I think this is a good plan...time will tell.
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Old 05-02-2010, 11:27   #34
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Someone may have already suggested this--but cabbage is a wonderful "boat" food. It keeps for weeks with out refrigeration if stored properly and can be used in place of lettuce in salads, sandwiches, fish tacos etc.
Thanks,

how long can I expect cabbage to last? how should I store it?
will the white and red cabbage keep the same?
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Old 05-02-2010, 14:38   #35
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powdered milk....Is non fat ok?
Yes. I use it for cooking and in cereal. I just don't drink it straight (I like as much milk fat as possible).

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oil....olive oil only is ok? can I cook and fry with olive oil?
Yes, yes you can. I don't suggest DEEP frying, but sauteing is okay. If you're gonna deep fry, pick up a bottle of peanut oil if you're not allergic to peanuts.

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Vinegar....which one? rice etc. can I carry only one type?
I use white vinegar for cleaning up and balsamic for salads. That's about it.

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canned tuna.....I have a problem carrying sea food while living at sea.
I would say I don't blame ya, but it's kinda like not having any frozen blackberries in the freezer when you own a blackberry patch. Ya never know how the crop will turn out.
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Old 05-02-2010, 15:42   #36
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We have missed seaweed of the list only know the UK varieties that can be eaten by sight, so can't offer much advice for warmer climes but some interesting possibilties for the more adventureous perhaps.

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Old 05-02-2010, 20:05   #37
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I wrapped cabbage in paper towels and stored them in hammocks out of sunlight. (hanging in the quarter-berth) The outer leaves will dry and turn brown but when you peel them back the rest of the head is fresh and crisp still. Someone may have an even better storage suggestion, but this worked in the bahamas during the summer months. I have done this with both green and red cabbage.
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Old 05-02-2010, 21:26   #38
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Your 1st task is to learn how to cook, otherwise with your limitations on storage, cans and refrigeration you will be one hungry camper....other than salami the items on your staples list all require some know-how....to put together.

I hope you are a good fisherman, there are few sources of protein on your list.and you will also need to add a good source of vitamin C....
You can boil eggs peel em and pickle them....

If you don't want canned tuna...get some canned chicken meat..costcos is a good source.

Bread---find a recipe for irish soda bread...it's very easy, no yeast involved..I add raisons or craisons to mine...start to finish in 50 minutes! add baking soda to your list..

They have whole milk that requires no refrigeration..(parmalot)..you can use powdered to supplement. or get cans of sweentened condensed milk.

Oatmeal, and/or dry cereal...like a granola with dried fruit and nuts...again costcos has a good one.

There are many varieties of rice and grains..bring a few.....basmati, Rissoto, cous cous, cracked wheat etc...get them in plastic containers with screw on lids.
I might bring some corn grits....or I call it polenta..

A piece of salt cod might be worthwhile..some cured ham..

Peanut butter..had been mentioned!

dried..packaged soups....or soup bases...the commercial variety comes in smallish plastic jars...Chicken, Beef, vegetable, mushroom, lobster bases are all available.
use them as a base for soups or...as stock for cooking your rice in.

Pastina...ditalini...in addition to regular pastas...make good soup or stew additives.
Dried mushrooms..
lemon, limes, grapefruit..as long as they'll hold up..
Some aged dry cheese..

I always carry some white clam sauce..and linguini..

There are lots of good pickled items...that will store well..

Keep all your dry beans..rice, flour, baking ingredients in good airtight containers...moisture is the enemy.

Bon appetit...
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Old 06-02-2010, 00:08   #39
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Black beans and rice are a staple south of the US border, so start experimenting with spicing up what can be a nutritious adjunct to any (and every) meal, including breakfast.

Here is my favorite Latin breakfast recipe known as “gallo pinto”:

Yesterday’s leftover beans and rice (leave cooked rive overnight or it will gum)
Cooking Oil (olive, veg or peanut)
Sausage (optional)
Sprig of cilantro – finely chopped
Salt and pepper

Heat the oil, add a little finely chopped sausage ‘till cooked, add beans and cilantro and finally rice. Mix it all up over medium heat and serve with scramble eggs. Looks horrible – tastes great and sticks with you all morning.
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Old 06-02-2010, 00:30   #40
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I actually find it hard to get peanut oil (is the same as arachide oil) here to I would bring a bunch of that. You need this for high temperature frying because olive oil would just burn.

cheers,
Nick.
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Old 06-02-2010, 02:03   #41
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I really enjoy ceviche as a method to prepare fish underway. One basic recipe is simply put fresh filets in pineapple chunks diced tomatoes lime and hot sauce and marinate. The Hondurans use lime and coconut. The recipe is very flexible, you basically need an aciditic food to pickle and a sweet tor the contrast that makes it oh so tastey. Canned foods work great as does fresh. Great alone, over rice on sandwiches. Throw in onions, garlic, beans just about anything I've never made a batch that turned out bad. Mackeral is one of my favorite fish for this but again any non toxic fish will do.
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Old 06-02-2010, 02:46   #42
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Maybe we need a new thread?

Preparing for a three month cruise myself, I plan on experimenting with different foods and recipes at home and trying some of the canned meats, cheese and butter found online and at our local "international market".

Keeping notes, this is a good way to both help provision and hone the culinary skills (mine formerly limited to boiling eggs and making very basic meals).

I have learned that a small pressure cooker is a valuable piece of kit and will save a tremendous amount of both time and fuel.
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Old 06-02-2010, 12:48   #43
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This doesn't add much to what has already been said, but the attached Lists includes a list of my basic food stores for 5 weeks for 4 crew and 27 recipes.

I spent some time collecting the recipes and modifying them for 4. My criteria in selecting them were a) things I like b) easy to prepare c) use a basic set of ingredients. The List of foods stores was then created using these recipes. I provision based on this list then supplement with whatever interesting that becomes available.

This is just an example of a possible approach you could use to establish your own basic store of provisions - not that your final lists would look anything like this.

Two items I don't believe have yet been mentioned are dried sausages such as Chorizo and Wraps for bread - it is amazing the what can be done with Wraps and they can store for months.
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File Type: pdf Lists.pdf (184.4 KB, 388 views)
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Old 06-02-2010, 14:56   #44
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I must add masa mix. It's easy to make fresh corn tortillas once you figure it all out and you can put any leftover meat on fresh a tortilla with some salsa and it's about the best thing ever. Even plain refried beans on a fresh tortilla can rock your world and you can feed ten people for about a nickel. Even as simple as a tortilla with melted cheese.
Bear in mind that I am a totally biased psycho Mexican food addict and that I've spent years overcoming my Midwestern/ Eastern European genes to learn all I can about cooking great Mexican food.
I talked to a Lebanese guy and a Mauritian last week that both agree with me that Mexican food is our favorite kind of food. Funny how everyone in California becomes a little bit Mexican eventually.
Sounds kinda like the shrimp farmer in Forrest Gump but with tortillas instead of shrimp.
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Old 06-02-2010, 18:30   #45
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Oh, one more thing.

IF YOU DON'T EAT IT AT HOME THEN DON'T BRING IT ON THE BOAT.

No use in stocking up in stuff if you don't eat it in the first place. Which is why I don't put corn on any of my lists.
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