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Old 15-02-2013, 08:10   #361
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Originally Posted by Alecadi View Post
Fries are belgian but not french
Add to your list:
Foie gras
Frog legs
Mayonnaise (not mayo! In a can)
Cassoulet
Cheese
Etc etc
You forgot the most important one - champagne
Gotta love the French for inventing that .
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:15   #362
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Poutine sounds like a heart attack waiting to happen, however good it may taste.
These guys are taken Poutine to the next level. It's not only something to eat at 3am after a night of drinking anymore:
French Fry Week Day 3 – Candy Poutine

WARNING: Don't ever let these guys near the galley!
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:16   #363
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaworthy Lass View Post

You forgot the most important one - champagne
Gotta love the French for inventing that .
You're absolutely right!
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:17   #364
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Originally Posted by Seaworthy Lass View Post
Most have some kind of antibacterial action. I guess you would use whatever you prefer on your salad.

Miracle Whip?
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:27   #365
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

salad outside of usa can get dicey. watch how fields are fertilized....can be a problem....
toilet paper is readily available now in mexico...lol even charmin...
not every attempt out here to catch a fish is a success--make sure you have some kind of substitute handy....
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:32   #366
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Re: Homony, Grits, Polenta, Posole

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Taken from wise geek.

Hominy refers to corn without the germ. It is served both whole or ground. Hominy is boiled until cooked and served as either a cereal or as a vegetable. Hominy may also be pressed into patties and fried. This dish is especially popular in the southern United States. Samp is another name for coarse hominy. Hominy ground into small grains is sometimes called "hominy grits."
American colonists used the words "hominy" and "samp" interchangeably to mean processed corn. The colonists, unfamiliar with corn, had to learn from the Indians how make the tough grain edible. The pioneers prepared hominy by soaking the kernels in a weak wood-based lye until the hulls floated to the surface.
Colonists usually kept both a samp mill and an ash hopper near their kitchens. A samp mill was a giant mortar and pestle made from a tree stump and a block of wood, which was hung from a tree branch. The branch acted as a spring. The samp mill was used to crack hard kernels of dried corn into coarse meal. The ash hopper was a V-shaped wooden funnel. Wood ashes were put into the funnel, and then water was run through the funnel to make lye. The lye was then used to soften the corn hulls and create hominy.
An English traveler in 1668 once described hominy as similar to the English dish, "Hasty Pudding." Hasty pudding and hominy were the instant cereal of colonial times.
The word samp fell out of use but the word "hominy" was eventually joined with the word "grits" in the American South. In the rest of America, hominy referred to the whole kernels which were skinned but not ground; in most of the South, "hominy" came to mean the coarsely-ground skinned kernels used to make the dish known as "hominy grits" or plain "grits."
In New Orleans, the whole kernels are still called "big hominy" and the ground ones are known as "little hominy."
In the American Southeast, grits are eaten with everything--country ham, shrimp, fried fish, eggs, cheese, gravy, etc.--to this day.
In the Southwest, big hominy is called "posole," and it is used to make hearty stews of hominy, chile peppers, and pork. Southwesterners and Mexicans will also grind small hominy until it is very fine and use it for tamale and tortilla dough.
The essence of good grits lies freshly milled whole-grain products, which helps to retain the flavor. Quick or instant grits are available.

Polenta and grits are the same. Polenta cost more.
Badsanta:

Good info! I ran out of oatmeal recently and the supermarket had a sale on Grits. So I bought some. I've been making it for breakfast and throwing in some Okra and Corn. A very tasty if unconventional cereal. Going to try it with spinach too.
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:35   #367
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Okra and cornmeal cooked together are known in da ilons as 'fungi' which is pronounced 'fun-ghee'

http://recipes.caribseek.com/Saint_T...ra-fungi.shtml
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:35   #368
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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salad outside of usa can get dicey. watch how fields are fertilized....can be a problem....
You said it!

Fertilized and watered. The gorgeous green leaves could have been sprayed with contaminated water all its life. In South America it is recommended to soak for a minimum of 30mins leaves or stuff you eat uncooked with some product that kills the bacterias. Too risky for me.
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:40   #369
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

funghi here is mushrooms, dried....fresh are champignones....
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Old 15-02-2013, 08:48   #370
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Originally Posted by tamicatana View Post
Okra and cornmeal cooked together are known in da ilons as 'fungi' which is pronounced 'fun-ghee'

CaribSeek Recipes | Okra Fungi Recipe | Caribbean Cornmeal Mush Recipe
And here I thought I came up with a new taste sensation on my own.
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Old 15-02-2013, 09:23   #371
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Miracle Whip?
ROFL

Good one!!! You are in top form today Blue Crab
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Old 15-02-2013, 14:14   #372
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

There will be days when you can't cook because you're sick, or low on fuel, or too busy, or seas are too rough, etc. Keep a supply of some ready-to-eat foods such as peanut butter, nutrition bars and homemade gorp with a good balance of carbs, protein, fiber.
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Old 17-02-2013, 01:46   #373
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

"ready-to-eat foods such as peanut butter, nutrition bars and homemade gorp with a good balance of carbs, protein, fiber."

Don't tell anybody, but Janet Groene is recommending above an old Native American standby for long trips: pemmican.

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Old 17-02-2013, 12:26   #374
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

One more thing. It's essential to read labels so you know exactly what you are getting. Many nut spreads including the "health" ones contain sugar, lard and other undesirables. Is the flour bleached, bromated, contain salt and baking powder? Is the canned milk regular, low fat or no fat. Is there an expiration date on the package? Is the tuna packed in water or oil? What kind of oil? Do the canned vegetables contain salt? What about expiration dates? You get a shipload of vital info by reading the fine print.
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Old 17-02-2013, 12:32   #375
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Originally Posted by JanetGroene View Post
One more thing. It's essential to read labels so you know exactly what you are getting. Many nut spreads including the "health" ones contain sugar, lard and other undesirables. Is the flour bleached, bromated, contain salt and baking powder? Is the canned milk regular, low fat or no fat. Is there an expiration date on the package? Is the tuna packed in water or oil? What kind of oil? Do the canned vegetables contain salt? What about expiration dates? You get a shipload of vital info by reading the fine print.
And that's why we send the ladies to the super market. I'm sorry Janet but I have better things to do then figure out what oil is in a can of tuna you just got off a shelf in Mexico.
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