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Old 07-01-2011, 03:48   #316
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Originally Posted by Pete7 View Post
Oh, forgot the beef dripping oh toast too

First time I asked for the stock from a beef joint to be saved and served for Sunday breakfast my fellow mess members were aghast

Delicous

Pete


Well, surely one of the skills needed when off-shoring is the ability to use everything up and throw nothing away? And in a high activity environment, fats are pure energy and if you burn them off, rather than store them, then they do a lot less harm.

The reason Ulster Frys are so lethal is that you cook the meat - bacon and sausge - first and then put the breads and farls in to the meat pan to soak up all the fats and flavours of the meat. The pan is bone dry when you're done.

Definitely not suitable for vegetarians, vegans or those with a prohibition on pork.
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Old 07-01-2011, 07:59   #317
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Too far south - you need an Ulster Fry and although there's a heart attack in every mouthful, you only need one meal to get through the day until night time dinner.
It sounds like something to try but I'll stick to my muslie, yogurt and fruit for my regular breakfast.

Maje
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:26   #318
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Funny enough the 'Fry up Brit Breakfast' is the best Hangover cure I know....
if you can get past the 'Involuntary Heave' at the first mouthful...... rofl
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:30   #319
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It sounds like something to try but I'll stick to my muslie, yogurt and fruit for my regular breakfast.

Maje
It's really man food - even Ulster women don't eat it. They feed it to their men-folk and then make sure that the life insurance policies are paid up in full and look forward to a comfortably retired widowhood.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:30   #320
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Funny enough the 'Fry up Brit Breakfast' is the best Hangover cure I know....
if you can get past the 'Involuntary Heave' at the first mouthful...... rofl
I think it is the large mug of tea that re-hydrates you and removes the hangover .... the food just holds it down.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:35   #321
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Oh, forgot the beef dripping oh toast too
Bacon drippings are OK, but beef drippings??? - ughh!
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:09   #322
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How to make beef dripping

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Bacon drippings are OK, but beef drippings??? - ughh!
Drain all the juices from the tray a beef joint was cooked in, into a glass jug. Using a spoon lift off any oil that is floating on top, normally only a couple of spoon fulls. You will now be left with a jug of clear liquid and some small bits of beef at the bottom. Allow to cool then place in the fridge overnight.

At breakfast time the fat will have solidified into dripping which can then be spread on hot toast. At the bottom the remaining beef juices and bits of beef will have solidified into a jelly and this is also spread on top of the dripping and toast.

Kept in the fridge the dripping will last a week easily.

Pete
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:16   #323
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Homony, Grits, Polenta, Posole

Taken from wise geek.

Hominy refers to corn without the germ. It is served both whole or ground. Hominy is boiled until cooked and served as either a cereal or as a vegetable. Hominy may also be pressed into patties and fried. This dish is especially popular in the southern United States. Samp is another name for coarse hominy. Hominy ground into small grains is sometimes called "hominy grits."
American colonists used the words "hominy" and "samp" interchangeably to mean processed corn. The colonists, unfamiliar with corn, had to learn from the Indians how make the tough grain edible. The pioneers prepared hominy by soaking the kernels in a weak wood-based lye until the hulls floated to the surface.
Colonists usually kept both a samp mill and an ash hopper near their kitchens. A samp mill was a giant mortar and pestle made from a tree stump and a block of wood, which was hung from a tree branch. The branch acted as a spring. The samp mill was used to crack hard kernels of dried corn into coarse meal. The ash hopper was a V-shaped wooden funnel. Wood ashes were put into the funnel, and then water was run through the funnel to make lye. The lye was then used to soften the corn hulls and create hominy.
An English traveler in 1668 once described hominy as similar to the English dish, "Hasty Pudding." Hasty pudding and hominy were the instant cereal of colonial times.
The word samp fell out of use but the word "hominy" was eventually joined with the word "grits" in the American South. In the rest of America, hominy referred to the whole kernels which were skinned but not ground; in most of the South, "hominy" came to mean the coarsely-ground skinned kernels used to make the dish known as "hominy grits" or plain "grits."
In New Orleans, the whole kernels are still called "big hominy" and the ground ones are known as "little hominy."
In the American Southeast, grits are eaten with everything--country ham, shrimp, fried fish, eggs, cheese, gravy, etc.--to this day.
In the Southwest, big hominy is called "posole," and it is used to make hearty stews of hominy, chile peppers, and pork. Southwesterners and Mexicans will also grind small hominy until it is very fine and use it for tamale and tortilla dough.
The essence of good grits lies freshly milled whole-grain products, which helps to retain the flavor. Quick or instant grits are available.

Polenta and grits are the same. Polenta cost more.
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Old 07-01-2011, 09:34   #324
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It's really man food - even Ulster women don't eat it. They feed it to their men-folk and then make sure that the life insurance policies are paid up in full and look forward to a comfortably retired widowhood.
But then one must find someone else to help with the boat.

Maje
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:14   #325
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But then one must find someone else to help with the boat.

Maje
With sufficient insurance you can purchase a boat... and many find widows very attractive, especially wealthy ones...
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Old 06-02-2013, 16:37   #326
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Poutine, like fish eggs, snails, frogs legs, and other delicacies enjoyed in certain places the French have been, has simply never made it big in America.
Not to drag up past debates (well, actually I am) but apparently poutine is now trendy in Chicago:

Quote:
Consider poutine. This homely dish, a tradition in Quebec, has become a popular menu item at some of Chicago's trendiest eateries. Take a mess of french fries, sprinkle on cheese curds then ladle brown gravy all over it. Embellishments range from foie gras to kimchi. Reactions range from "Yuck" to "Yum."
Poutine commands attention, like so many imports from the land of moose and maples.
Editorial: Canada is on a roll - chicagotribune.com
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Old 06-02-2013, 16:58   #327
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

Poutine sounds like a heart attack waiting to happen, however good it may taste.
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Old 06-02-2013, 18:33   #328
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

"Reactions range from "Yuck" to "Yum." "
Yeah, "Yuck" sounds like it has taken the second city by storm.
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Old 07-02-2013, 10:31   #329
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

Sooooooo, any ideas on long-term storage foods and/or foods that can be readily gathered in the tropics via foraging, hunting, fishing or diving ?? Um, without making the natives angry with you

Also, any suggestions for the best nets to use for catching fish miles offshore for survival sustenance ??
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:45   #330
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Re: The Most Basic Essential Foods

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Hasty pudding and hominy were the instant cereal of colonial times.
"Hasty Pudding" was a breakfast staple in our New England home, always with maple syrup on top. We make it on the boat. Our favorite hot cereal, however, is Red River, from Canada. It's basically a combination of grains, including flax seeds.
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