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Old 22-08-2010, 14:43   #31
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I did some consulting for a guy who was on a round-the-world helicopter flight, about his survival/medical needs.... The guy handling his other survival equipment suggested a jar of peanut butter.

Peanut butter makes a lot of sense: It's incredibly high calorie density food, provides protein, carbs and fat (all important), is more or less palatable, and inexpensive. Plus, it keeps you occupied in your life raft trying to lick it off your palate....
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Old 24-08-2010, 19:56   #32
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Seriusly, we found super pasturized Yogurt that did not require refrigeration at Costco. Canned meats like hams will last forever. My wife's great aunt once severed a 32 year old ham. As long as the cans are intact, not bulging - botulism should no be a problem. If they are bulging, wipe the contents on your face to eliminate wrinkles.
That was the best!

I wouldn't need refrigeration if I was 15 minutes from a grocery store 24 hours a day
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Old 25-08-2010, 00:33   #33
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pirate long life

most crew's that came through the boatyard used to swear by sunshine powdered milk, that & the gluten free flour reckoned it was the only thing that didn't end up rotten 12months later
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Old 25-08-2010, 03:15   #34
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One thing I have in onboard is Gastrolyte satchels, which are a glucose electrolyte re-hydration powder. I suppose the real problem is that in a ditching you will need water or have to take the more bulky already constituted bottled form.

The space restraint in ditch bags and life rafts makes me think it would be wise to carry some of those bags that use osmosis to expand into a litre or more of liquid similar in taste and nutrition to grape juice. According to some Taoist nutritional texts, grape juice like prunes mentioned above is an excellent form of nutrition for overall wellbeing. As such, in a real survival situation, this product provides both essential liquid and much need nutrition. Here is a link to the product:

http://www.fleetwatermarine.com/seap...ater_maker.htm

Has anyone had any experience using these things?
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Old 25-08-2010, 04:47   #35
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Chocolate lasts forever, so long as it's kept in a fairly cool place.
Your kidding, a box of chocolates won't last the weekend in our house
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Old 25-08-2010, 04:55   #36
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Your kidding, a box of chocolates won't last the weekend in our house
30 minutes max on my boat

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Old 26-08-2010, 22:36   #37
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Dried chick peas, kidney-beans and lentils keep forever - I'm not vegetarian, but I took a vegetarian recipe book with me across the Atlantic & Pacific - there were loads of excellent recipes for dried pulses.
Agreed... I just made a chili from beans I picked in a garden back in 2001 - 9 years ago. I kept them in an airtight glass jar, soaked them, and honestly, I could not tell the difference from dried beans I buy at the supermarket.
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Old 28-08-2010, 04:30   #38
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Janet,

I am also wondering like Fishwife above if we are talking real survival foods or just palatable long life rations? Real survival food for me is talking extremely compact and high nutrition rations and hydration systems along with fishing/hunting gear that will fit in a ditch bag or life raft. However, if you are interested in tips and recipes for long life rations have a look at the following page

http://tasmania.bushwalk.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=16&sid=956ba2fe671a4fff2511a8d11a7 efe8e

I met one of the sites creators trekking at Frenchman’s Cap and was amazed at the delicacies he created using his own home dehydrator and packaging systems. I am sure he would not be offended if you joined the site and made the same proposal about recipe suggestions.

As a chef I should also get off my lazy butt and start experimenting with the same. For some reason I have currently become addicted to simple bacon, eggs and jaffles. This probably has something to do with the fact I have a stove and icebox on the boat, both being impossibly too heavy and bulking to transport in a backpack!
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Old 28-08-2010, 05:50   #39
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Oh, by the way I find TVP is an extremely useful source of protein to the point where I consider it a staple in my larder and would definitely not discount its value as emergency rations if not survival food. When I cook it – most often in bolognaise - I have never had a complaint even from dedicated meat eaters. I hate to say, it is often not so much the recipe as the skill of the chef that makes the dish. Likewise, if I get time to help you on the site with those finishing touches I will do so just excuse me if I am slow to reply.

One thing that instantly struck me on your website was the Mock Turtle Stew. I was really worried about hinting at such delicacies due the contemporary political correctness. However, if you go back not long seaman in the pacific longed for a good old turtle omelette. Of course nowadays we would also find a replacement for the protected eggs! I do like how you note the salt content of the ingredients. One suggestion I would make is that for such a fine dish replace the cornstarch with arrowroot or rice flour as either give a nicer shine or translucency to the sauce.

Similarly, if you are worried about the skin on the coconut rum custard (yum)why not adapt the recipe for bread and butter pudding or even brulee?
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Old 05-09-2010, 11:04   #40
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The MREs Meals Ready to Eat, Army surplus) are pretty good, easy to store and pack and last for years. I didn't care for the liver and onions, but they all taste good if you're hungry.
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Old 12-09-2010, 16:39   #41
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Chocolate bars are a much better emergency food than livestock because:

- They take up less space
- You don't need to remember to feed them
- You don't have to clean up after them
- They smell nicer
- They don't look at you with big, doleful eyes before you want to eat them
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Old 12-09-2010, 16:42   #42
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Take water. You can go for weeks without food. Only a couple of days without water.

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Old 12-09-2010, 17:03   #43
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water and chocolate, as long as it is dark chocolate...cereal bars are good.
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Old 12-09-2010, 20:30   #44
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.... The guy handling his other survival equipment suggested a jar of peanut butter.

Peanut butter makes a lot of sense: It's incredibly high calorie density food, provides protein, carbs and fat (all important), is more or less palatable, and inexpensive. Plus, it keeps you occupied in your life raft trying to lick it off your palate....
An old favorite for Alaskan survival kits is peanut butter mixed with honey. In cold weather, whether in a raft or marooned on the beach, your main need for food (at least for the near term) is to generate warmth through metabolism. "Fuel for the fire!" (Your internal fires, that is.)

Keeps fine in a generally chilly climate like we have up here, but shelf life might be a problem in the tropics? Oh yeah, be sure to pack it in a wide mouth container, so you can chisel it out with your knife when it gets really cold! However, the excercise will also keep you warm.
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Old 12-09-2010, 21:01   #45
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only thing about pbutter is its tendency to make one thirsty and there fore cause asthma attacks in those prone to that disease, and to those allergic to peanuts--killer.
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