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Old 26-04-2012, 07:04   #16
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Re: Storm Foods?

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.............

Ginger biscuits are great as are anzac bikkies
Ah yes, I had forgotten the anzac bikkie, will have dig grandma's special recipe!
A truly nourishing and appetizing food.
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Old 26-04-2012, 07:06   #17
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Re: Storm Foods?

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First, are you talking storm foods or foods consumed during heavy weather?

During real storms -- granola bars

Heavy weather -- whatever is easy and can be heated in one pot. I keep frozen chili, pasta dishes, cooked dried beans, stews and any number of other similar pre-cooked foods in one-meal size packages in the freezer. Toss into a single pot to heat and eat from a deep bowl, usually up in the cockpit. Or my husband will eat a sandwich and I will stick to crackers or granola bars.

Judy

I always have a few Cup of Noodles in the galley ready for nasty weather sailing. Add a dollop of peanut butter and it makes a nice quick warm meal while under way.
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Old 26-04-2012, 07:12   #18
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Re: Storm Foods?

storms at anchor i cook stews and soups and such..anything..i do not sleep ..
under way---if i am in a storm underway is a sudden one and i wont cook so i eat what is there--finger foods.sammishes,,,whatever. fruits, cookies, if i have em, other finger foods.
i check my weather prior to leaving on a passage and storms usually are not an issue.
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Old 26-04-2012, 07:13   #19
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Re: Storm Foods?

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My wife and I would cook up tasty dishes, vacuum seal and freeze them. The packages were relatively flat and stacked in the freezer nicely. There were four servings per bag--for me and three sailing buddies on the passages. We always had a homemade hot meal for dinner, even in Force 9 conditions. Does wonders for crew morale.

Dishes included beef stew, pasta with tomato/meat sauce, sauteed chicken breasts in mushroom cream sauce, sliced roast pork in gravy, lasagna, chili and rice, chicken cacciatore, and the like. We had about a dozen recipes we really liked. We cooked enough for the expected duration of the passage, with canned stuff for reserves.

We found that cooked pasta tossed with a little olive oil turned out great. You'd think it would be a solid mass after being vac-sealed, but it fluffs right up after it's heated. Same for cooked rice. Sides were salads for the first few days, then canned veggies. For rough weather we used pasta that would fit in a spoon, like penne, ziti or rigatoni. Linguini is to hard to eat when it's rough.

We'd heat a pot of sea water and plunk the bag(s) in. When hot, serve right out of the bag. No pots to wash. Hot seawater was used to wash dishes and utensils, with a fresh water rinse. We'd pull the next evening's dinner out of the freezer an put it on the reefer side to thaw overnight. No sense wasting propane thawing the meal, and it helped keep the reefer side cold.

When it was really rough we served a meal that could be eaten out of a bowl with one hand holding the bowl and one for the spoon--no knives and forks. Never had any problem heating up meals in rough weather, though the cook would wear foulie bottoms just in case the hot water sloshed over on him.
Gosh, if you ever need crew........

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Originally Posted by Mark1977 View Post
Pre-made boiled eggs.
Hard boiled presumably.

I can see myself dropping the eggs into the same pot that Hud is using for his pre-frozen gourmet packages. A great hot meal while the weather is building with boiled eggs for later when it becomes too tough to do anymore galley wise. Oh yes, a couple of anzacs and perhaps a gingernut.

This storm is feeling better already.
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Old 26-04-2012, 08:06   #20
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Re: Storm Foods?

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What is everyone's favourite heavy weather food item.

The food you use for energy in really bad weather and the motion is such that cooking is a nightmare.

Hot and cold ideas please.

NOTHING hot. Sandwiches for me, that's it. I keep baked beans, canned fruit, etc. -- but I wouldn't even heat the beans in heavy weather. Of course, where I live it doesn't last long.
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Old 26-04-2012, 08:13   #21
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Re: Storm Foods?

would think the food would relate to the length of passage where in the long passage makers use different cooking methods and techniques than do the short hop sailors.
for a 4 day passage, if a sudden storm hits and doesnt leave ye, ye should, mebbe , have planned a bit better for the weather window, even tho noaa means not one accurate assessment.
on a day sailor, is easy to go sans dinner or whatever meal is missed. on a long passage, is necessary to eat AND DRINK something--bouillon or whatever to maintain the body and prevent dehydration and weakness.
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Old 26-04-2012, 08:35   #22
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Re: Storm Foods?

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would think the food would relate to the length of passage where in the long passage makers use different cooking methods and techniques than do the short hop sailors.
for a 4 day passage, if a sudden storm hits and doesnt leave ye, ye should, mebbe , have planned a bit better for the weather window, even tho noaa means not one accurate assessment.
on a day sailor, is easy to go sans dinner or whatever meal is missed. on a long passage, is necessary to eat AND DRINK something--bouillon or whatever to maintain the body and prevent dehydration and weakness.
Good point about passage length Zee; I was actually thinking about passages of 2+ weeks because as you have rightly pointed out, nutrition becomes an important tool in managing the safety of vessel and crew, especially in less than perfect conditions.
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Old 26-04-2012, 09:58   #23
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Re: Storm Foods?

We usually have a Mediterranean-chicken-cous-cous-chick pea-curry-raisin concoction that we typically have in the fridge. It is very good cold and nutritious as well. This is our go-to lunch quite often and it comes in real handy when the going gets rough.
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Old 26-04-2012, 10:07   #24
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Re: Storm Foods?

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We usually have a Mediterranean-chicken-cous-cous-chick pea-curry-raisin concoction that we typically have in the fridge. It is very good cold and nutritious as well. This is our go-to lunch quite often and it comes in real handy when the going gets rough.
Sounds good! Any chance of getting the recipe?
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Old 26-04-2012, 10:10   #25
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Anything cooked with ginger. Even though I don't get motion sickness, it seems to help.
+1 to that

In addition to ginger and peppermint teas, ginger chew candy and lightly curried rice dishes.
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Old 26-04-2012, 10:17   #26
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Re: Storm Foods?

Dont laugh ,but plain old peanut butter and jelly sandwiches are easy to make and are very settling for a queasy stomach. I bet that I dont eat 2 a year on land, but they are good quick energy in bad weather or the first day or 2 of a passage, so I always try to have PB&J handy on a boat. ______Grant.
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Old 26-04-2012, 10:23   #27
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Re: Storm Foods?

For heavy weather when I cannot be below cooking and need to stay on deck most of the time, pilot bread, cheese, pickles or raw turnips, perhaps a tin of sardines--hard candy or chocolate (Scho-ka-kola preferably if I cannot have my coffee).
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Old 26-04-2012, 11:01   #28
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Sounds good! Any chance of getting the recipe?


I'm at work right now, I'll have to look it up once I get home.....
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Old 26-04-2012, 12:17   #29
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Re: Storm Foods?

We do not have too many miles under our keel so our storm experience is proportionately limited. But with the little experience we have, I found that this works for us:

> hot food beats everything:

If we believe it is too risky to cook on the top (this has happened 2 maybe 3 times this far) we will bake stuff in the oven.

> candy and treats:

Somehow I believe (or I am just justifying someone) chocolate keeps morale up.

> hot drinks:

This is where we are too exposed - not so easy to make tea in the oven. Anyways in any sort of weather we try to sip a hot drink at least once every trick. Sometimes we do not get the drink but we get hot & wet charts/electronics or whatever stands in the way of the flying pot ;-)

I must add that my first mate will cook in all sorts of weather but, very unfortunately, when I cook then anything more than F5 is already 'storm cooking'.

b.
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Old 26-04-2012, 12:23   #30
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Re: Storm Foods?

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Interesting idea. But, I think my pressure cooker accomplishes pretty much the same thing for me.


Tied down onto the cooker. Each time you eat some of the unknown stew the top up with a few more random ingredients and give it a good stir.

A slowly morphing stew.
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