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Old 05-12-2008, 11:55   #1
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Storag Containers

Would appreciate your recommendations for containers to use for long term storage of sugar, pastas, rice and etc.
Thanks, Duke
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Old 05-12-2008, 14:03   #2
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Originally Posted by Duke 48 View Post
Would appreciate your recommendations for containers to use for long term storage of sugar, pastas, rice and etc.
Thanks, Duke
I like the stackable, clear, air-tight, locking food storage containers. There are a bunch of manufactures.

I had some that were white crockery with a nice gasket and (unfortunately rusting) white metal locking mechanism. But even though they were durable enough (except for a three foot or greater drop ... and the rust) they were impossible to look in without opening.

One I don't like is a Martha Stewart version. They clear polycarbonate, but not air tight enough. Sugar will form a crust, flour does not do so well; I've noticed nothing bad with pasta or legumes.
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Old 05-12-2008, 14:15   #3
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Tupperware.
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Old 05-12-2008, 14:39   #4
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If you google "US Plastics" you can order a lot of different things in all sorts of sizes. These are mostly industrial type containers but the prices are pretty good and you don't have to buy 100 of them at a time. I think you can find many items like tupperware for less money.

Containers that are very air tight are a great thing to have for most dry goods like salt, flour and sugar. Plastic zip lock bags are fine for short term but they don't reuse that well and they don't take a lot of opening and closing. Once you get an idea of the types of containers the next thing is to find the sizes and shapes that fit the lockers on your boat. If you can stack and fill a locker solid then you can maximize the space you have. If you get into the habit of leaving all the product packaging at the dock side trash then you can save space and avoid the problems with larvae that live in the cardboard packaging. This makes it easier to store things in a specific location independent of the packaging it comes to you from the store. You might also use these inside the fridge as well as in lockers.
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Old 05-12-2008, 14:42   #5
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Would appreciate your recommendations for containers to use for long term storage of sugar, pastas, rice and etc.
Thanks, Duke
We keep such foods on board for a year or more at times and mostly rely on the original packaging of the manufacturer as that packaging has been designed by him to preserve shelf life. Opening it to transfer into long term storage in another container doesn't make good sense to me.

We also buy in convenient size packings and as a package is opened the unused contents are transferred into a food grade container. Convenient size packages rather than in bulk also mean that if for some unexpected reason there is unexpected spoilage in a bag (and that has never happened for us) the loss is only limited to a small quantity rather than the whole boat's stock. "Convenient sized package" for us for the likes of sugar and rice is around 3kg and the likes of the more easily spoilt flour 1-2 kg.

In the case of some products that come in paper bags, such as for flour, which are easily punctured, may fail through dampness, or be non resistant to small insect attack we drop the whole bag into a plastic bag and tie the top.

Bagged as opposed to carton packaged goods take up less room - and if purchased from unreliable sources carton packaged goods may have insects in the space between the carton and the inside packaging.

We pay attention to Use By dates when purchasing to stock the boat and all is just stored in open topped plastic bins.
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Old 05-12-2008, 17:33   #6
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Thanks to all for the info.
Duke
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Old 05-12-2008, 18:16   #7
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Bagged as opposed to carton packaged goods take up less room - and if purchased from unreliable sources carton packaged goods may have insects in the space between the carton and the inside packaging.
There are no reliable sources of paper containers. Actually all flour has a percentage of larvae in the product itself. Even the FDA can't keep out some small percentage of larvae. Old flour grows bugs by it's very nature. Oat meal is even worse.
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Old 05-12-2008, 19:03   #8
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There are no reliable sources of paper containers. Actually all flour has a percentage of larvae in the product itself. Even the FDA can't keep out some small percentage of larvae. Old flour grows bugs by it's very nature. Oat meal is even worse.
While I tend to agree with you I think it depends where one buys the products especially to do with civilised and climate.

For example, here in NZ the only product we end up having to buy in paper bags (but it is a heavy filled paper) is flour.

Flour in paper here is "Best By" dated at least 1 year out from date of packaging and we have had that on board for at least that time and never had any critters turn up in it. I can remember though that when I was a child critters would turn up in flour but have to say that was back in the 1950's and things have changed a bit since then - although it appears that little chewing critters have gotten into my hair since then .

Oatmeal here (and most other places I've noticed) is available packed in plastic and with "Best By" dates again at least 1 year out from date of packaging and again we have had no critters turn up in it.

These products are not gamma radiated here (is prohibited here except for some imported fruits and herbs, for all food products for emotive reasons ).

Now getting to the other end of the spectrum I have worked and lived in tropical third world countries (so third world that worked and lived with security guards with big growly doggies outside ) and I would expect the crawlies to start appearing in flour, etc within days if not imported packed in unbreached plastic .
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Old 05-12-2008, 22:09   #9
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Small Bugs in flour

The best idea I've heard so far, (haven't tried this yet but will) is a glass jar with the glass lid and rubber gasket. Fill the jar with your four or meal of choice, but don't shake rattle and roll to compact. Place a small thumbnail size piece of dry ice on top and close the lid gently but don't fasten it. the idea is to allow the CO2 which is heavier than air to build up and sink into the meal or flour (but not explode the jar). With a clear jar you can see if it's gone, with something else you need to check. When the dry ice is gone, seal the jar and most everything inside will die or at least not hatch for a very long time! Most intelligent folks should be able to judge the lid thing using a little bit of common sense mixed with a smudge of respect for the possibility of exploding glass objects. If your really worried about exploding glass objects, place a bath towel over the jar while it's off gassing (but still don't fasten the lid till the dry ice is gone!)

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Old 06-12-2008, 02:56   #10
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We are big fans of "Lock & Lock" storage containers. They can be found at Walmart, Target and other retailers. They are also inexpensive. They are water and airtight.
I even store things like my Xchange oil pump in the bilge in one.
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Old 06-12-2008, 04:04   #11
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food storage containers

The screw top jars that contain everything from nuts to panut butter work great. Shop store like Costco that stock the monster sizes. We particularily like cashews. THey come in 2 lb jars that will hold over a lb of sugar, a lot of tea bags, and over 1 bl of coffee. Besides a convenient size , they are free. Just buy the contents, use it, remove the label and wash. Bob
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