Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 23-10-2009, 18:58   #31
Long Range Cruiser
 
MarkJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Australian living on "Sea Life" currently in England.
Boat: Beneteau 393 "Sea Life"
Posts: 12,828
Images: 25
Alcohol.....

No one takes me seriously but....

How do I say this and make you think I am not joking?

If you really do get sea sick and want to try something to make you get over it...

go sailing one night with a convivial crowd and get drunk.

Obviously have people sober to control the boat.

Just drink, chat and get drunk and you might find your inner ear the forever thinks seasickness is just drunkenness.

Please don't bag the idea. I said it seriously and it worked for me and may for some others.
__________________

__________________
Notes on a Circumnavigation.
OurLifeAtSea.com

Somalia Pirates and our Convoy
MarkJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-10-2009, 20:04   #32
Senior Cruiser
 
nautical62's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Live Iowa - Sail mostly Bahamas
Boat: Beneteau 32.5
Posts: 2,264
Images: 12
I unfortunately am very prone to seasickness and have tried most everything out there and observed many crew who have too. My observations and experiences are:

1. Getting good rest/sleep, drinking tea, ginger, avoiding time below and obtaining from alcoholic beverages all help, but none of these compare to good meds. Being able to stay upside, focus on the horizon and not work below is the biggest help for me of the non-med options.

2. I've never tried the fancy wrist bands you have mentioned, but have tried and witnessed the pressure point wrist bands. My conclusion is that any positive effect they have is placebo. I've thrown up in mild seas wearing them and have seen many others do the same.

3. Meds: I've tried several times each: Meclazine (Generic, in Bonine and non-drowsy dramimine), Scopolamine patch, (transderm behind he ear patch) Stugeron (hard to get in U.S.) My experience has been that all make me and most people I've sailed with drowsy to a degree. Even Meclazine used in "non-drowsy" dramamine knocks many people out. Other than that, I find the generic form to be very affordable and have few side effects. i find if I take it regularly, the first severe drowsiness soon goes away, but pulling all night watches while on it always difficult for me. The scapolamine patch also makes me drowsy but also had other side effects including dry mouth, dizziness and less focus. Being a patch means you don't have to take oral doses as often, but also means it's easy to forget when it runs it's course. Stugeron is more expensive and harder to obtain for U.S residents than Meclazine. I find the side effects similar. For me, meclazine is easier. However, while I have no personal experience, from accounts I've read, I think Stugeron may be more effective in rougher conditions.

All the best in figuring out what works for you. I know what a difference managing your sea sickness can make to the cruising experience.
__________________

__________________
nautical62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-2009, 17:29   #33
Registered User
 
Pacific Jewel's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: New Zealand
Boat: Ta Shing Tashiba 40
Posts: 99
Stugeron - hands down. I've taken them myself and given them to guest on board. Absolutely brill. I've only been able to find them in the UK. I see posting here stating they are also available in Canada. Wherever you can get them, do so. Highly recommended.

The active ingredient is 15mg cinnarizine.

Good luck!
__________________
Pacific Jewel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-2009, 19:48   #34
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: Sabre 38 Mk1
Posts: 3
I swear by Scopace - oral scopolamine (Hope Pharmaceuticals.) Easier to manage the dose - vs. the patch - and few side effects for me. It's a prescription but very inexpensive. I previously tried wrist bands, Motion Eze (oil behind the ear), OTC meds, and ginger. We do keep candied ginger on the boat for guests.
Diane
(New member!)
__________________
Diane Stryker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24-10-2009, 20:27   #35
Certifiable Refitter/Senior Wannbe
 
Wotname's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: South of 43 S, Australia
Boat: Van DeStat Super Dogger 31'
Posts: 7,331
Quote:
Originally Posted by Diane Stryker View Post
I swear by Scopace - oral scopolamine (Hope Pharmaceuticals.) Easier to manage the dose - vs. the patch - and few side effects for me. It's a prescription but very inexpensive. I previously tried wrist bands, Motion Eze (oil behind the ear), OTC meds, and ginger. We do keep candied ginger on the boat for guests.
Diane
(New member!)
Welcome aboard Diane, glad to hear you have managed the seasickness issue.
__________________
All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake in the day to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangereous men, for they may act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible. T.E. Lawrence
Wotname is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 11:46   #36
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 5
A cup of hot ginger and honey before I get on the water and then ginger beer/ale during the trip. Snack on savoury biscuits during your trip until you settle down. Try and avoid feeling stressed.
__________________
Fishmatics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 15:31   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
I know that ginger is excellent for preventing seasickness. My boat is always stocked with ginger candies and ginger tea, although (knock on wood) I don't get seasick very often.

But does anyone know WHY ginger works? I've asked this question before, but no one seems to know.
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 15:42   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: California Coast
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 331
Posts: 680
MarkJ is right...

Actaully, the few times that I have felt seasick, and it doesn't happen often, I just make myself throw-up and then I drink a couple of beers (no matter what time it is) then I eat some saltine crackers and VIOLA... all better.

I have had a few crew look at me like... "Hey, is the skipper really drinking beer at 0500!?"

Works for me.
__________________
Liam Wald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 15:50   #39
Registered User
 
paradix's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australasia
Posts: 284
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam Wald View Post
Actaully, the few times that I have felt seasick, and it doesn't happen often, I just make myself throw-up and then I drink a couple of beers (no matter what time it is) then I eat some saltine crackers and VIOLA... all better.

I have had a few crew look at me like... "Hey, is the skipper really drinking beer at 0500!?"

Works for me.
I wonder if the alcohol is playing a significant part though? My own solution is to have something carbonated to drink (cola or similar) and something salty to eat (chips or similar), which together seem to settle the digestion and ease stomach cramps. So you're definitely getting both of those with beer and saltines... Maybe the relaxing effect of the alcohol is an additional help?

Conversely, many many years ago I used to take seasickness pills to stop myself vomiting after drinking excess beer at university...
__________________
paradix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 15:52   #40
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,966
Thanks to Diane for mentioning Scopace (oral form of scopolamine).

I've stayed away from Scopolamine because of the different stories. Some people love the patches, some say they don't work, some get frightening side effects. It now seems that this may be due to different drug absorption rates due to differences in peoples' skin (oils, sweat, etc). They are getting very different doses varying from too little to too much. The pills can avoid this problem.

It's also easy with the pills to take the lowest dose that works for you. Some people try cutting a patch in half but this is dangerous since you can get the drug on your fingers and then in your eyes.

Like the patches, Scopace is a prescription and neither my doctor nor my local pharmacy had heard of it - but my pharmacy was able to get it in a day --no problem. I've only tried it once so far and it worked great -- glad to hear another positive experience.

Motion Sickness - Prevent It and Enjoy Your Travel with Scopace

Carl
__________________
CarlF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 16:02   #41
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Hudson Valley N.Y.
Boat: contessa 32
Posts: 826
there are two phases, first you think you are going to die; then you are afraid you won't !
__________________
mrohr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-11-2009, 18:42   #42
Commercial Member
 
CharlieJ's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Boat: Gulfstar Long Range Trawler; 53'; BearBoat
Posts: 835
Captain Mike Maurice delivers boats up and down the left coast and has had to deal with seasick crew and Owners. He has hit upon a solution that works and has detailed it on a website: Seasick Cure

Good luck!
__________________
Charlie Johnson
JTB Marine Corporation
"The Devil is in the details and so is salvation."
CharlieJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2009, 12:37   #43
Registered User

Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 9
I can get very seasick and we spend half the year on our sailboat and the other half sailing afternoons. I had the wristband on when we sailed from FLA to Bahamas and the seas were confused like an agitator. I spent six+ hours dry heaving. I have since learned to take whatever meds the night before I know we are going to be offshore - I prefer Sturgeron and purchased a year's supply last spring in the Bahamas. Getting the meds into my system before I set out and keeping it going at low doses until I feel acclimated works for me; even if I've been living on the boat in calm waters. We sailed FLA-Nassau-Exumas-Eluthera-Abacos last winter and I was never seasick altho the seas tested us. However, just couple weeks ago I participated in an offshore race and my meds were on the boat so didn't take my own advice ... spent the afternoon with my mouth clamped shut hoping the race wasn't a two out of three!

I'll do anything BUT give up sailing.

Good luck.
__________________
Takinbetz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-11-2009, 14:00   #44
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
Repeated and long term seasickness is sometimes cured permanently with hypnosis. An obstetrician in Honolulu who used hypnosis as an aid for morning sickness among his patients did two sessions with me. End of problem. Permanently. [I am not normally a follower of such things, and I thought hypnosis was just a parlor trick. It really worked.]
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2010, 18:24   #45
Moderator... short for Cat Wrangler
 
sarafina's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: San Francisco
Boat: Cal 28 Flush Deck
Posts: 5,559
Images: 56
I am a happy girl! Being back sailing this last year hes been wonderful. My new skill; seasickness even in pretty light seas has not been wonderful at all. The wrist bands help. The ginger helps. The saltines help.

But this week I was out sailing, and we were doing almost 9 knots. I was never queasy for even a moment. I sat in the head reading a magazine and felt nothing but pleasure as the boat heeled under me. I sat in the cabin and chatted and warmed up a bit. I clambered around on the deck and felt fabu.

I may never sail with out scopolamine again. No side effects, no anything, including no seasickness.

I would say if sea sickness bothers you try the patch. If it doesn't work for you because you are sensitive to it you haven't lost anything. And is it works? You are gonna SO be loving life on the water!

I did apply it to clean skin with no lotion or perfume. I was careful per my Dr's instructions to wash my hands VERY thoroughly after I applied the patch. Scopolamine is from the same plant family as belladonna and causes eye dilation and blurred vision if you have some of it on your hands and rub your eyes. I put it on about 4 hours before we set off.

life is good ; -)
__________________

__________________
Sara

ain't what ya do, it's the way that ya do it...
sarafina is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Can Someone Become Immune to Seasickness ? moomintroll Health, Safety & Related Gear 34 29-03-2011 19:13
Seasickness & Prevention CaptainK Health, Safety & Related Gear 38 04-02-2006 01:31
Seasickness kyanps Meets & Greets 30 03-08-2005 07:38
Seasickness marleman Health, Safety & Related Gear 12 14-08-2004 12:15



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:37.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.