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Old 24-05-2018, 03:30   #31
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, Dave.
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Old 24-05-2018, 03:39   #32
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Wave Dave View Post
Hello,

I'm new. 50 years old, married a long time, kids grown, disposable income, looking for a hobby. I've lived on the FL Gulf Coast my entire life. I love the water and have sailed as the guest of others. I, however, have never owned a boat and do not know how to sail. A few questions, if I may.

1. How does one learn to sail?

2. How does one determine the right type/size boat?

3. Am I too old for this nonsense?

Thanks.
1. Read and youtube, then do it, worked for me.

2. By buying one.

3. Nope, about right I reckon.

Don't over complicate. Don't underestimate. You won't get everything right. You won't get everything wrong.

That moment you cut the engine and power off under sail on a perfect day, all that stuff just disappears.

Winf
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Old 24-05-2018, 13:28   #33
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Welcome to the forum, Dave. I took boating safety and navigation classes from the U.S. Power Squadron. Met a lot of knowledgeable folks in class who had boats, and invited me to crew. I learned from them, and then chartered in the Virgin Islands. Also read a lot of books, and I read this forum often.
Good luck!
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Old 24-05-2018, 16:05   #34
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Re: Questions From a Novice

What course you plot really depends on what you want to get our of sailing.

If you want to sail a vessel that you can take coastal cruising, or up and down the ICW, or sail over to the Bahamas you need more than a sailing dinghy.

it is a very good plan to join a sailing club and take lessons. Some use ASA acredited and organized classes.

You should be learning from jump street, seamanship, boat systems, engines, electrical systems, VHF procedures, running and standing rigging, emergency equipment, marine head systems, fresh water systems, running lights, steaming lights, anchor lights. Stove systems and fire fighting.

Reefing and sail changes, sheet block placement, Knot tying, coiling lines, Departing and docking undersail and power, and dock line handling .

Signal lights and day shapes, fog procedures, sound signals over taking, and all of the many right of way rules. Coastal Piloting and Navigation, GPS, Anchoring methods, scope, rode, single hook, bow and stern, bahamian moor, and mooring pick up and dropping off. Add in standing and running rigging.

And all that is just the beginning. You need real sailing vessels that you do not have to purchase, especially when you are just beginning. OPB ( Other peoples boats ) is a very good plan.

Then after you go through all of the lesson senarios, you can get your experience sailing different types of vessels, and then be able to make an educated and experience backed decision as to what type of sailing vesse that you wish to purchase....or just keep sailing the clubs boats, and for international sailing, bare boat in the caribbean, south pacific, Australia, Europe, etc.

Also most sailing clubs....have many different types and makes of boats. You will be able to learn what fits you and your needs.

The ocean does not love you, and will surely rise up and smite thee soundly for any indifference, lack of knowledge, or disrespect. You will not be able to beat her down, but you can work with her .

Learn as much as you can, from all of those professional and experienced instructors, study, sail, pass the exams and check outs. and get out there and go sailing on your own .

Your responsibilities , as skipper, are the safety of the boat and the safety of the crew and passengers.
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Old 24-05-2018, 18:11   #35
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihuedooley77 View Post
What course you plot really depends on what you want to get our of sailing.

If you want to sail a vessel that you can take coastal cruising, or up and down the ICW, or sail over to the Bahamas you need more than a sailing dinghy.

it is a very good plan to join a sailing club and take lessons. Some use ASA acredited and organized classes.

You should be learning from jump street, seamanship, boat systems, engines, electrical systems, VHF procedures, running and standing rigging, emergency equipment, marine head systems, fresh water systems, running lights, steaming lights, anchor lights. Stove systems and fire fighting.

Reefing and sail changes, sheet block placement, Knot tying, coiling lines, Departing and docking undersail and power, and dock line handling .

Signal lights and day shapes, fog procedures, sound signals over taking, and all of the many right of way rules. Coastal Piloting and Navigation, GPS, Anchoring methods, scope, rode, single hook, bow and stern, bahamian moor, and mooring pick up and dropping off. Add in standing and running rigging.

And all that is just the beginning. You need real sailing vessels that you do not have to purchase, especially when you are just beginning. OPB ( Other peoples boats ) is a very good plan.

Then after you go through all of the lesson senarios, you can get your experience sailing different types of vessels, and then be able to make an educated and experience backed decision as to what type of sailing vesse that you wish to purchase....or just keep sailing the clubs boats, and for international sailing, bare boat in the caribbean, south pacific, Australia, Europe, etc.

Also most sailing clubs....have many different types and makes of boats. You will be able to learn what fits you and your needs.

The ocean does not love you, and will surely rise up and smite thee soundly for any indifference, lack of knowledge, or disrespect. You will not be able to beat her down, but you can work with her .

Learn as much as you can, from all of those professional and experienced instructors, study, sail, pass the exams and check outs. and get out there and go sailing on your own .

Your responsibilities , as skipper, are the safety of the boat and the safety of the crew and passengers.
Good grief!!

With respect, if one needed to amass all that knowledge prior to going sailing on one's own boat, VERY few would be out on the water.

There are plenty of us who started in sailing dinghies or daysailors, took no lessons and have survived to become world traveling cruisers in larger boats.
Worked for me!

Some folks learn well from formal tuition, others by doing stuff themselves. I see lots of advice to beginners that involve endless lessons and then chartering all sorts of vessels. That route can eat up cash that would buy a useful cruising boat, one that would actually get one out sailing and learning. I don't see the fiscal soundness of that approach for anyone with limited funds. I don't see the necessity of the process for anyone for that matter!

So Big Wave, don't let this list of overwhelming requirements discourage you
from setting forth. There are simpler routes to take...

Jim
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Old 25-05-2018, 08:04   #36
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
Good grief!!

With respect, if one needed to amass all that knowledge prior to going sailing on one's own boat, VERY few would be out on the water.

There are plenty of us who started in sailing dinghies or daysailors, took no lessons and have survived to become world traveling cruisers in larger boats.
Worked for me!

Some folks learn well from formal tuition, others by doing stuff themselves. I see lots of advice to beginners that involve endless lessons and then chartering all sorts of vessels. That route can eat up cash that would buy a useful cruising boat, one that would actually get one out sailing and learning. I don't see the fiscal soundness of that approach for anyone with limited funds. I don't see the necessity of the process for anyone for that matter!

So Big Wave, don't let this list of overwhelming requirements discourage you
from setting forth. There are simpler routes to take...

Jim
Jim, you have that right. That post would run anybody off.
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Old 25-05-2018, 08:34   #37
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Wave Dave View Post
Hello,



I'm new. 50 years old, married a long time, kids grown, disposable income, looking for a hobby. I've lived on the FL Gulf Coast my entire life. I love the water and have sailed as the guest of others. I, however, have never owned a boat and do not know how to sail. A few questions, if I may.



1. How does one learn to sail?



2. How does one determine the right type/size boat?



3. Am I too old for this nonsense?



Thanks.


As others have posted take classes! I suggest folks take ASA 101 and then charter a few times. Charter a bigger boat with a captain- most are happy to do a semi-teaching charter or a little 20’ Boat. The physics is basically the same, just the forces are less.

Then do ASA103- same deal.

By the time you do ASA 104 you will be confident to take out a 35 foot boat on you own.

Try to get different instructors for each class. This was you get different perspectives. Also every sailor has a bad habit or two. Having different instructors let’s you see how different sailors do things.

Boat size? Assuming good instructors and decent student skills— you should be able to bring a 35-40’ boat alongside by the end of 104. So after some charters under your belt- moving to a 40-44 should be a bit brainer. With little to no help. Just take your time.

Age? That depends on your physical condition and your mindset. By taking the classes you will know if this sport is right for you.

Feel free to PM
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Old 10-06-2018, 06:50   #38
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Re: Questions From a Novice

My suggestion are to crew on a boat or go sailing with a friend and determine if this nonsense is for you. To me there is nothing like sailing and there is a lifetime of continuous learning. Even experienced sailors learn new stuff all the time.

Also make sure your better half enjoys sailing as much or more than you do before embarking on this hobby.


As far as your age 50 is the new 30 so no you are not too old.
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Old 10-06-2018, 07:49   #39
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Re: Questions From a Novice

Dave, the great thing about CF is the many different opinions and wealth of knowledge that’s out there. I started my adventure only 3 years ago with absolutely no knowledge of sailing or sail boats, only a dream. We now have a boat and will be leaving this November for white sandy beaches, full body tans and beautiful sunsets.
Here’s my thread below -

50 and Ready To Shove Off
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