Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-03-2008, 22:19   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 51
Propane vs Kerosene vs Other Cooking Fuel

I'm working on figuring out what household items to keep for when I move aboard (detailed in another post).

I have two of the new type (5-gallon?) propane tanks for my current land-lubber bar-b-que. These aren't cheap and I'm thinking I should keep them for use onboard.

Propane stove in the galley and bar-b-que hanging off the transom?

Feedback appreciated.

Thanks - Jake
__________________

__________________
MaDouleur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2008, 22:27   #2
Senior Cruiser
 
senormechanico's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2003
Boat: Dragonfly 1000 trimaran
Posts: 5,827
IMHO, it's the best way to cook as long as you have a propane sniffer.
I recently took out a kerosene (wallas) glass cooktop and replaced it with propane. Propane makes better popcorn, heats faster and cools off quicker.

Steve B.
__________________

__________________
senormechanico is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2008, 22:28   #3
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by senormechanico View Post
IMHO, i't's the best way to cook as long as you have a propane sniffer.

Steve B.
Ah yes - propane is heavier than air and can flow into the bilge and fill the cabin. BOOM! Thanks!
__________________
MaDouleur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-03-2008, 22:46   #4
Senior Cruiser
 
jackdale's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 5,048
Images: 1
Remember that both of the propane tanks must be stored in lockers that vent overboard. Aluminum tanks weight less and are less subject to corrosion.

Get a good quality marine BBQ. Dickenson and Magma get my vote.

A propane sniffer is OK, but I would suggest that the tanks be turned off when not in use. An inline solenoid with a switch on the electrical panel and one near the stove is also essential.

Jack
__________________
ISPA Yachtmaster Ocean Instructor Evaluator
Sail Canada Advanced Cruising Instructor
IYT Yachtmaster Coastal Instructor
ASA 201, 203,204, 205, 206, 214
As I sail, I praise God, and care not. (Luke Foxe)
jackdale is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19-05-2008, 08:52   #5
cruiser

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Charleston, SC
Boat: Camano Troll
Posts: 4,669
Propane on Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by jackdale View Post
Remember that both of the propane tanks must be stored in lockers that vent overboard. .............

A propane sniffer is OK, but I would suggest that the tanks be turned off when not in use. An inline solenoid with a switch on the electrical panel and one near the stove is also essential.

Jack
Very important. There are some ABYC requirements for propane on a boat that must be followed closely.

Our boat that was factory equipped with a propane stove, oven and broiler has a propane locker in the cockpit, vented overboard, a remote operated solenoid with the control switch in the galley, a propane detector, and a gauge for checking for leaks. Another requirement is that there be no connections inside the boat except at the appliance.

The stove and oven burners are equipped with thermocouples so if the flame goes out, the propane to that burner is shut off.

A closed cabin boat partially filled with propane would make a great bomb!
__________________
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-05-2008, 10:14   #6
Registered User
 
Greenman's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Halifax NS
Boat: '75 Hunter 27 SD
Posts: 178
Images: 76
Is there much risk of a Propane tank going Boom in the event of a lightening strike? I really like propane BBQ's, but could do without if the risk was too great.
__________________
Greenman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-05-2008, 10:30   #7
Senior Cruiser
 
sandy daugherty's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: near Annapolis
Boat: PDQ 36 & Atlantic 42
Posts: 1,178
There is little risk of a Propane tank 'going boom' in a lightning strike; it shouldn't be part of a path to ground. There is some chance of it contributing to a pre-existing fire if it is punctured or exposed to sustained high temperatures, so a separate locker is recommended. Solenoid valves and sniffers are no-brainers.

Propane tanks make mediocre bombs. A REALLY good bomb starts with deisel fuel. (See Mcveigh, Timothy) [g]
__________________
sandy daugherty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-05-2008, 13:49   #8
Registered User
 
Greenman's Avatar

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Halifax NS
Boat: '75 Hunter 27 SD
Posts: 178
Images: 76
Thanks, I doubted they would be much of a risk, but was not certain.
__________________
Greenman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26-05-2008, 06:16   #9
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,580
Images: 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
Very important. There are some ABYC requirements for propane on a boat that must be followed closely...
ABYC Standard A-1 MARINE LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS (LPG) SYSTEMS
is available online at:
http://www.abycinc.org/committees/A-01.pdf
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 26-05-2008, 07:32   #10
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: SW Florida
Boat: Bristol (Alden) 35 Sloop "Zephyr"
Posts: 498
Images: 2
I started cruising with alcohol, switched to kerosene, then finally joined the real world and got Propane.
The Alcohol stove I had, I believe was a Hilerange, with large cast iron burners. It was a hot stove, but we were using 3 galons of alcohol a month! A apin to get sometines, and more of a pain to store.

I then found a nice used Kerosene stove. It used a litle less fuel, but the inside of the cabin slowly got grey. So slow that we hardly noticed it at first. The kerosene stove didn't boil water any faster than the old alccohol stove. I tested both. with the same pot and a measured amount of water. I know it's not to be that way, but with these stoves it was.

Finally I was thinking of switching to Propane, and was in a ASurburbane propane store and was able to get the burners, and valves, that I figured would fit my stove. I went to back to the boat to measure, and when I went back a few days later to buy them, The guy wasn't there, and when I told the person that he hadn't given me a price, she said, "well then, merry Christmas!"
I installed them and it worked fine. Sorry, no safety thermocouple. I used a solenoid, and had the tank mounted to the pushpit.
a 20# propane tank would last us about 4-5 months!

2 years later I bought a stove with oven/broiler, because the home built one was rusting out.

I kept a PVC tube with 2 small propane cylinders, sealed and strapped under the helm seat, in case we couldn't get a fill up. Had to use them 1 time.
__________________
over40pirate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-05-2008, 17:14   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: - San Diego and Fort Collins, CO
Boat: 38' Homebuilt Cutter - "Atticus"
Posts: 136
Is propane readily available as you cruise? Like in Mexico and Central America? Or do you need to bring enough with you?
__________________
Colorado Dreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-05-2008, 19:19   #12
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: SW Florida
Boat: Bristol (Alden) 35 Sloop "Zephyr"
Posts: 498
Images: 2
Not sure of those areas. East coast of US and Bahamas, no problem, plus the propane lasts a long time.
__________________
over40pirate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-05-2008, 20:22   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pblais's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Hayes, VA
Boat: Gozzard 36
Posts: 8,700
Images: 15
Send a message via Skype™ to Pblais
Quote:
I have two of the new type (5-gallon?) propane tanks for my current land-lubber bar-b-que. These aren't cheap and I'm thinking I should keep them for use onboard.
Actually they are cheap as in exceptionally cheap and almost worthless. Steel tanks have a short lifespan at sea what with salt water and rust and everything. You will find propane in more places than everything else combined. In less affluent countries everyone uses small tanks and get them refilled or exchanged. You do need to be concerned how you store them though. They can be quite dangerous when filled and start flying about when not tied down. A leak settles in the bilge and then blows up when you start the engine. Blasts everything into nice small pieces too. Quite dramatic. Personally I think it's the only serious way to go. You of course need to do it all up right Gord has the right web links.
__________________
Paul Blais
s/v Bright Eyes Gozzard 36
37 15.7 N 76 28.9 W
Pblais is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18-06-2008, 15:57   #14
Registered User

Join Date: May 2008
Location: SW Florida
Boat: Bristol (Alden) 35 Sloop "Zephyr"
Posts: 498
Images: 2
The first 2 years I used propane, I used a 20# steel tank (s)
Had it secured to the stern rail as many cruisers do. the 2 nd time I need to fill it after about a year on the boat, I didn't bother to take it and see if they would fill it. It looked so bad, I bought another one. Another steel one. The alum ones were so expensive and not in the budget.
Have since picked up 2 10# aluminum tanks.
__________________
over40pirate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14-07-2008, 05:57   #15
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Boat: Islander Freeport 38C, " Bristol 29.9, "Rag Time"
Posts: 21
I am in the process of buying a 1983 Cape Dory 30 which is equipped with a very clean, hardly used Hillerange pressure alcohol stove with oven. I would like to change the burners to kerosene but have not been able to find a source. Any suggestions? I know most sailors poo poo the idea of kerosene because of the greying effect, but in the US I use paint thinner (recommended as superior and not smoky by a qualified petroleum engineer) instead of kero with great success. Unfortunately, only the US stuff works..something about the way it is refined here.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
__________________

__________________
BoatTed is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
fuel

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HilleRange Kerosene Manual clausont Provisioning: Food & Drink 4 15-10-2011 12:45
Stove/Oven - Kerosene vs Propane jpcraw Provisioning: Food & Drink 49 18-04-2008 20:12
Replacing the kerosene stove with a propane, advice rebel heart Provisioning: Food & Drink 10 13-09-2007 12:56
Propane or Gas in the Bahamas for Cooking ? livingstone Construction, Maintenance & Refit 5 25-06-2007 22:59



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:04.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.