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Old 29-11-2015, 15:59   #46
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Opposite experience: helped an older couple move their boat from the BVI to Annapolis. Got into seriously ugly weather for several days, heavy rain, big confused/breaking seas, regular green water over the boat...in the cockpit it was a pretty miserable scene, but then the companion way door would open...it was like a portal into another world...warm, bright, and wonderful galley smells...real meals would appear in the companion way! This guys wife was amazing.

If I had galley duty the crew would haven been lucky to have been sucking cold soup thru a straw! ; )
Good to know that it is possible to cook good food even under rough conditions!
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Old 29-11-2015, 16:00   #47
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

You need to sail with a different cook and/or a smarter captain. A baked potato takes 5-6 minutes in the microwave. Most any meat or large fish cooks in 10 minutes or less on the rail mounted grill plus 5 min to heat up. Eggs take 1-2 minutes on the stove top, oatmeal or instant grits 1-2 minutes in the microwave. Good luck in finding a better berth.
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Old 29-11-2015, 16:16   #48
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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You need to sail with a different cook and/or a smarter captain. A baked potato takes 5-6 minutes in the microwave. Most any meat or large fish cooks in 10 minutes or less on the rail mounted grill plus 5 min to heat up. Eggs take 1-2 minutes on the stove top, oatmeal or instant grits 1-2 minutes in the microwave. Good luck in finding a better berth.
The microwave seems like a good idea, but back in 1984, they were pretty bulky and heavy--not that much room in the galley. I do really like the idea of a rail-mounted grill--very cool idea, as long as the boat is moored!
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Old 29-11-2015, 17:43   #49
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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The microwave seems like a good idea, but back in 1984, they were pretty bulky and heavy--not that much room in the galley. I do really like the idea of a rail-mounted grill--very cool idea, as long as the boat is moored!
Rail mounted grill is absolutely required equipment for cruising. And in the right condition you can use it undeway (ideally propane not charcoal though).

Microwave, or combination Micro/convection even better, but probably not realistic in that era. Lots of juice to run so need a big inverter or a gen set.
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Old 29-11-2015, 22:47   #50
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

For the most part, I insist on meals that can be served, in a bowl, eaten with a fork!
Put non skid mats on the counter tops;
I've found a disposable paint roller tray to be the best draining arrangement for containing dishes after washing.
Keep the boat sailing as flat as possible, then you'll have less "adventures".
I'm no great cook but I do have the discipline to get organized before meal prep and not to leave any open containers on the counter; put 'em in the sink as you work.
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Old 30-11-2015, 10:56   #51
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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For the most part, I insist on meals that can be served, in a bowl, eaten with a fork!
Last time (the only time) I was out in open ocean, the cook tried for some sort of pork roast in a sauce. Turns out, due to the heel and the swells, all the sauce was on one side of the pot. So as I was at the wheel, the easiest way to eat the dried out hunk of meat was to jab my fork in it and gnaw it off... made me feel quite salty and piratical...
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Old 30-11-2015, 13:18   #52
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Rail mounted grill is absolutely required equipment for cruising. And in the right condition you can use it undeway (ideally propane not charcoal though).

Microwave, or combination Micro/convection even better, but probably not realistic in that era. Lots of juice to run so need a big inverter or a gen set.
The microwave really didn't have a fighting chance of making it into the story...the rail-mounted grill, though...hmmm...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 01kiwijohn View Post
For the most part, I insist on meals that can be served, in a bowl, eaten with a fork!
Put non skid mats on the counter tops;
I've found a disposable paint roller tray to be the best draining arrangement for containing dishes after washing.
Keep the boat sailing as flat as possible, then you'll have less "adventures".
I'm no great cook but I do have the discipline to get organized before meal prep and not to leave any open containers on the counter; put 'em in the sink as you work.
One of these days, I'm actually going to cook on a boat and not just write about it--all of this will come in very handy! Thanks!

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Last time (the only time) I was out in open ocean, the cook tried for some sort of pork roast in a sauce. Turns out, due to the heel and the swells, all the sauce was on one side of the pot. So as I was at the wheel, the easiest way to eat the dried out hunk of meat was to jab my fork in it and gnaw it off... made me feel quite salty and piratical...
Now, that's a funny visual!
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Old 30-11-2015, 13:41   #53
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by belizesailor View Post
Opposite experience: helped an older couple move their boat from the BVI to Annapolis. Got into seriously ugly weather for several days, heavy rain, big confused/breaking seas, regular green water over the boat...in the cockpit it was a pretty miserable scene, but then the companion way door would open...it was like a portal into another world...warm, bright, and wonderful galley smells...real meals would appear in the companion way! This guys wife was amazing.

If I had galley duty the crew would haven been lucky to have been sucking cold soup thru a straw! ; )
We had a hatch cover like a mini dodger over the campanionway. The cook and deckhand were constantly crouched there, half up, half down, chain smoking their disgusting cigarettes. Not only did they do nothing, but it was near impossible to go up or down because of their fixed position so they could smoke and stay dry.

However, I do not envy any cook. Just being below at all in big seas is a challenge without getting ill. I'm not prone to seasickness, but the rolling waves of the trade winds were more than I could take. When we reached the tropics, the heat below was unbearable. The skipper refused to go below at all because of the heat. My quarter berth had a small window to the cockpit which gave me a life saving breeze of fresh air, making by bunk tolerable. However, when a fish was caught it was butchered in the cockpit...if I wasn't quick to close my "port", fishguts and blood would come spraying through. One night, a carelessly tossed cigarette butt burnt a hole through my bedding...it could have caused a fire and the whole ship lost if it weren't for the fact that everything aboard was soggy and damp from the constant sea spray. In short, below was a nightmare. The main cabin was a soggy mess of tools, clothes and bedding. One night the cook fell out of his bunk and crushed a guitar lying loose below him. The guitar sat there for days, a broken hulk of splinters and strings trying their best to scratch your eyes as you pass. Seeing as no one else would touch it, I broke it down, put it in trash bags and stowed it with the garbage. You cannot imagine the insanity which ensued from this, which seriously nearly cost the skipper his life.

Civility and manners go out the door once the waves are up, and everyone is cold, tired, and hungry.

On the bright side...I lost 30 pounds in 6 weeks...I looked fantastic when I got home!!!
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Old 30-11-2015, 14:29   #54
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

Quote:
Originally Posted by hamburking View Post
We had a hatch cover like a mini dodger over the campanionway. The cook and deckhand were constantly crouched there, half up, half down, chain smoking their disgusting cigarettes. Not only did they do nothing, but it was near impossible to go up or down because of their fixed position so they could smoke and stay dry.

However, I do not envy any cook. Just being below at all in big seas is a challenge without getting ill. I'm not prone to seasickness, but the rolling waves of the trade winds were more than I could take. When we reached the tropics, the heat below was unbearable. The skipper refused to go below at all because of the heat. My quarter berth had a small window to the cockpit which gave me a life saving breeze of fresh air, making by bunk tolerable. However, when a fish was caught it was butchered in the cockpit...if I wasn't quick to close my "port", fishguts and blood would come spraying through. One night, a carelessly tossed cigarette butt burnt a hole through my bedding...it could have caused a fire and the whole ship lost if it weren't for the fact that everything aboard was soggy and damp from the constant sea spray. In short, below was a nightmare. The main cabin was a soggy mess of tools, clothes and bedding. One night the cook fell out of his bunk and crushed a guitar lying loose below him. The guitar sat there for days, a broken hulk of splinters and strings trying their best to scratch your eyes as you pass. Seeing as no one else would touch it, I broke it down, put it in trash bags and stowed it with the garbage. You cannot imagine the insanity which ensued from this, which seriously nearly cost the skipper his life.

Civility and manners go out the door once the waves are up, and everyone is cold, tired, and hungry.

On the bright side...I lost 30 pounds in 6 weeks...I looked fantastic when I got home!!!
I guess all that wasn't funny at the time, but it makes for an excellent story!

So, from what you say, and what I've heard repeatedly on this thread, is that even if someone isn't prone to seasickness, if they are below deck in "uneven waters" (I like that term!), they are going to feel ill. So, here's a question that I really need answered. If you feel like you're going to barf and you're below deck, do you make for the cockpit and hurl overboard--I mean, I guess you could use the head. Dare I ask, how does all that work?
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Old 30-11-2015, 14:48   #55
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

Any opinions on a Sea Swing?
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Old 30-11-2015, 14:55   #56
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

Sea Swings aren't seen all that much anymore, but in my experience they are sometimes the only practical way to heat a meal or a cuppa.

If you're feeling ill, either keep near the rail (on the leeside!), or keep a bucket handy.
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Old 30-11-2015, 14:56   #57
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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I guess all that wasn't funny at the time, but it makes for an excellent story!

So, from what you say, and what I've heard repeatedly on this thread, is that even if someone isn't prone to seasickness, if they are below deck in "uneven waters" (I like that term!), they are going to feel ill. So, here's a question that I really need answered. If you feel like you're going to barf and you're below deck, do you make for the cockpit and hurl overboard--I mean, I guess you could use the head. Dare I ask, how does all that work?
Often, one has to use the head. There won't be time to get above decks and to leeward.

This is a little gross for a family forum, but do you know how to tell whether you're seasick or have the 'flu? It's flu if you're spewing from both ends--and you need a puke bowl as well as the use of the head. Now if a crew of 4 had it all at the same time, options are really limited.
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Old 30-11-2015, 15:19   #58
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

If your character is going thru a learning process of cooking on board.....a common mistake that very good cooks make is that they fail to buy any 'ready to eat' food

Then, when a storm hits and the majority of the crew are down with seasickness... Any remaining person is left to scrounge thru uncooked ingredients trying to find something to eat.

Happened to me when on short delivery with the owner and paid crew of a large Swan to teach them celestial navigation.

The owner and his cook disappeared into their bunks for 3 days in a storm off Mexico.

Nothing suitable to eat as cook made everything from scratch and the fresh fruit/veggies were already gone.

Luckily Owner's wife with 6 month old baby had departed in Acapulco, so managed to find cases of baby food to eat for 3 days, until the Cook and rest of crew raised their sickly heads.
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Old 30-11-2015, 19:04   #59
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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So, from what you say, and what I've heard repeatedly on this thread, is that even if someone isn't prone to seasickness, if they are below deck in "uneven waters" (I like that term!), they are going to feel ill. So, here's a question that I really need answered. If you feel like you're going to barf and you're below deck, do you make for the cockpit and hurl overboard--I mean, I guess you could use the head. Dare I ask, how does all that work?
I think discussion of seasickness could be a whole nother thread.

The first sign is fatigue/sleepiness...yawning and such. The nausea is often debilitating before you get "barfy". If you are lucky, and are on deck, the lee rail is the best place, although in rough weather this can also be very dangerous. Below, I've seen people spew just about anywhere. in pots, on the floor, on bunks, in pillow cases, on themselves, or just plain all over. You don't get much warning, and feel so bad you don't care. However, afterwards, you sometimes get a few minutes of relief before the nausea takes over again. Seasickness is nothing to dismiss. It is often so bad that people will say they would rather be dead.

Once you've been sick a while, there is nothing left inside. You might dry heave for a while which can be excruciatingly painful (imagine 1000 sit-ups and you can't stop). But its not so messy. And anything that goes in, comes right back up. If you are lucky, you can sleep it off. I give "travel tabs", which are generic seasick pill, to my kids when it gets rough, and they usually just sleep through it.
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Old 30-11-2015, 19:16   #60
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Re: Need Cooking-While-Under-Way Advice for a Work of Fiction

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I guess all that wasn't funny at the time, but it makes for an excellent story!
I took hundreds of pictures and tons of video on the trip, with the expectation of writing some sailing magazine articles afterwards, or posting a 10 minute movie on uTube like so many others do. I made the mistake of mentioning this to my crew mates, and my camera "mysteriously" went missing at the end of the trip. The digital camera can be replaced, but the pictures and video were a great loss to me. I'm left with nothing but my memories, which fade with each passing day. Mostly I wanted to show the pictures to my kids, who missed me terribly while I was away.
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