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Old 19-08-2010, 18:28   #16
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Originally Posted by Bill Lee View Post
My Eastern European Mother has recipes for everything - many of them weird and gross (to me). Many incredibly delicious and most very simple to make. Yogurt was simple and tasty. Take a spoon of sour cream and roughly coat the inside of a glass jar with a thin coating of the sour cream. Add cold milk, put a lid on it and refrigerate. Voila: yogurt! Add sweetner, berries or eat plain. Cheers,
Bill
Hey Bill,

This is such a simple recipe and sounds great for cruisers and you could make a lot of yogurt from a small container of sour cream. I will certainly be trying this one out. Thanks to you and your Mum for passing it on. What other recipes does she have up her sleeve?

All the best,
Steve
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Old 20-08-2010, 06:35   #17
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Yogurt is made with different strains of bacteria than what are used to make sour cream. I'm not sure what Bill's recipe makes, but it's not yogurt.
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Old 20-08-2010, 06:44   #18
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Originally Posted by Lodesman View Post
Yogurt is made with different strains of bacteria than what are used to make sour cream. I'm not sure what Bill's recipe makes, but it's not yogurt.
That's what I thought until I read up on yogurt (yoghurt) and in some places of the world yogurt is called sour cream. Go figgur.

Still not sure I understand it but yogurt has been made (is made) in many different places in the world. However most people heat the milk to around 180 deg. f. for several reasons. To kill competing bacteria and so that the milk thickens as it becomes yogurt.
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Old 20-08-2010, 06:49   #19
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Bill is making more sour cream. Which you can also make from buttermilk.

From here: Milk fermenters in yogurt, buttermilk and sour cream

YOGURT: Yogurt is produced by a mixed culture of two types of bacteria. Imbedded in particles of the protein casein, [are] chains of cocci or diplococci (Streptococcus thermophilus) and big rod-shaped bacilli (either Lactobacillus acidophilus or L. bulgaricus).
BUTTERMILK is the fermentation of milk by a culture lactic acid-producing Streptococcus lactis plus Leuconostoc citrovorum which converts lactic acid to aldehydes and ketones which gives it its flavor and aroma.
SOUR CREAM is produced by the same bacteria as buttermilk, but the starting milk product is pasteurized light cream. Bacteria are less numerous than in buttermilk.

As I was poking around I came across this recipe for cheese. I think I'll try it this weekend. It seems pretty easy:

Cooking With Kurma - Ingredients
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Old 20-08-2010, 07:01   #20
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This works well in moderately warm to warm weather:

Put 1 cup fresh yogurt with live culture into medium sized glass bowl
Make 2 cups of instant milk (Carnation), using cold water and a little extra milk powder than called for
Stir into yogurt
Cover with plastic wrap
Let sit overnight on galley counter (unrefrigerated)

Viola! Great tasting home made yogurt!

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Old 20-08-2010, 13:24   #21
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Good idea for the thermos or just put a bottle of hot water in a small ice chest. (Good way to raise bread dough too) The one thing yogurt doesn't like, at least in my experience, is movement. We also like Junket, the dessert and it too won't set up if it is disturbed at the wrong time.
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Old 20-08-2010, 13:29   #22
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I like the thermos technique myself. works very consistantly
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Old 21-08-2010, 00:08   #23
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Old 21-08-2010, 00:42   #24
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I've not made a lot of yoghurt, and only one on the boat. After the yoghurt was added to the milk (which had been heated) in a glass jar, I left it in an oven warmed to 200F for an hour or so, but then turned then heat off, but left it inside, keeping the heat in.

However, most of my yoghurt escapades have left me with quite runny yoghurt. Any ideas on how to thicken it up?
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Old 21-08-2010, 00:54   #25
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I've not made a lot of yoghurt, and only one on the boat. After the yoghurt was added to the milk (which had been heated) in a glass jar, I left it in an oven warmed to 200F for an hour or so, but then turned then heat off, but left it inside, keeping the heat in.

However, most of my yoghurt escapades have left me with quite runny yoghurt. Any ideas on how to thicken it up?
Check table 3 (near the bottom) on this page: Yogurt: How to Make Yogurt at Home

My guess would be you did not get enough bacteria. This could be because your stater was not that great (not many active cultures), or you killed many of your cultures with too high heat by leaving the oven at 200 for an hour. Try turning it off as soon as you put the jar in. Also make sure you do not add your yogurt until the milk is below 115 F. If the milk is too hot it will kill the active cultures.
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Old 21-08-2010, 02:29   #26
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[QUOTE=MarkJ;505180]Hi Cindy,

There are just some things where the Down Under bits of the world excell over the USofA.

Yoghurt making is one!

We have available a cheap simple solution to making the most delicious yoghurt anywhere, anytime, at sea, in storms, using no electricity (apart from cooling). This stuff is so good even Mr Schoonerdog will be prowling the boat near the galley waiting for you to open the door!



Easy yo has our vote as well. Great minds think alike. We perservered with diet Greek ut then decided that life was too short for boring yoghurt and went back to the bad- 4 -U full strength Greek and guiltily love it on board.
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Old 21-08-2010, 03:01   #27
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Now all I need is a milk goat to live on board!
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Old 21-08-2010, 03:52   #28
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Wow, I never knew it could be so complicated! Always just heated milk, any sort, the fresh from the cow unhomoginized was the best cause it leaves some thick creamy yoghurt on the top, to just below boiling. If you put a flat disc of sorts in the bottom of the pot it will begin to rock gently and let you know to turn the heat down. Heat slow, milk burns easily. Once heated turn it off and let it cool to baby bottle temp, drop on the wrist test. then put it in any container with the tiniest bit of "culture", ussually the same container as the last batch that still has the scrapings left. The container wants to be insulated with dish cloths, covered and left in a warm place over night. There are insulated container you can buy but anything will do. It is left warm to accellerate the microbial proccess. Overnight by the woodstove in the winter or just wraped in cloth in the summer. No need for plug ins or fancy equiptment, you're just trying to get some bugs to grow that really want to anyway! Note, the first batch might be hard to get going as many yoghurts aren't live. They've been killed with all sorts of added stuff. Buy plain live culture yoghurt to start. Keep only yoghurt in the container, add anything you want in a seperate container and just set aside a spoonfull to start the next batch if you feel you must wash the container.
Oh, and as you went to the trouble to kill off the bugs that you don't want growing in there by the heating, be sure to keep the container covered and use a clean utensil to serve. Refrigeration if it is available is a good thing after it has matured which should be overnight.
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Old 21-08-2010, 03:59   #29
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Now all I need is a milk goat to live on board!
I must agree actually, because the fat in goats milk doesn't sepperate it makes wonderful yoghurt. Had two Nubians once. Increadible animals. They would make good shipmates! Might want to use wire sheets and halyards though and watch that the sails are out of reach....
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Old 13-09-2010, 03:38   #30
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SO with MarkJ on this one.

Recently bought a EZIyo on advice previously given here and boy is it good!!

No mucking round, so easy, clean, tasty

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