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Old 27-05-2016, 10:25   #16
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

I must confess I haven't used a PC on my boat yet. But I used to use one a lot when I had a steady home base.

I usually cooked more than I needed for a single meal and I was always careful to replace and seal the lid after I had removed a portion. As long as the content was still steaming hot I knew it would remain sterile (like canned food) and not need refrigeration. I reheated the pot each meal and the food remained good for 2 or 3 days. It often actually tasted better. It always got all eaten before it had a chance to go öff.

I wonder if any cruisers do the same, especially those that have limited or no refrigeration available.
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Old 27-05-2016, 10:38   #17
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

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use a basic stainless steel manual model, with spinning top weight. When the cooking time has finished, just switch off the heat, and carefully take the pressure cooker outside, and release manually by touching the weight with a wooden spoon, which will allow blasts of steam to escape until the pressure has dropped and the lid can be removed. No steam in the salon!
Not sure we would want to trust our lives to a stainless cooker. Cast aluminum will deform before it cracks. Stainless will blow apart before it deforms. Perhaps not a big issue with safety valves, but we have somehow experienced those "once in a billion" situations too many times to take chances. Like a neighbor's stainless plow anchor(because it looked nice) breaking apart under storm loads. Meanwhile our old CQR kept holding on, and on , and on. Wherever possible we have tried to avoid stainless metals on our boats.
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Old 27-05-2016, 11:34   #18
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

there again, many people will not cook in Aluminium these days owing to possible food contamination. Case of do you want to be poisoned or blown up ;-)
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Old 27-05-2016, 11:53   #19
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

we have a 4 quart Presto stainless steel one on the boat and a 6quart one at home. on the boat it saves propane, reduces the heat lost down below and provide a secure lidded pot that can be used underway, even just as a large, lidded, pan The modern ones are much neater and easier to use. Favourite recipes include braised lamb shanks in red wine, coq Au Vin ( chicken in red wine), meatloaf and various soups/stews. Steam release is not an issue as you can let the pressure reduce naturally off the burner, or take it to the cockpit and release it if in a hurry. We could even use our boat's gas BBQ on the stern as the heat source. In the early days we had Prestige aluminium stovetop models but prefer the stainless ones. The new ones have safety pressure valves built in and lid locks that prevent accidental opening before pressure is fully reduced.
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Old 27-05-2016, 12:26   #20
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

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there again, many people will not cook in Aluminium these days owing to possible food contamination. Case of do you want to be poisoned or blown up ;-)
We may be crazy but think the aluminum issue was debunked a while ago. Of course our memories are deteriorating, but that is probably from the lead goblets we use for our wine.
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Old 27-05-2016, 12:48   #21
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

On my catamaran I use two pressure cookers from Kuhn Rikon. I like them because cooking with is easy and fast. About the quality one we received from a client as a gift to our engagement in 1969 yes, April 1969 and still cooking strong. We had to replace from time to time the O-ring.
The other is from 1979 and also works still fine. I use it, as it is the larger one 5 L about 5,5 quarts if I have to cook larger amount of food eg. rice, stew, vegetables.
I never had problems and if you let cool down closed not steam. But that needs some experience because you have to shorten the cooking time.
I'm very happy with the pressure cooker and would not leave for a voyage without them.
Fair winds
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Old 27-05-2016, 13:01   #22
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

Hi Sea Dreaming,

I'm a big fan of pressure cookers and have been using one on my boats for 30+ years now without any mishaps.

The primary reasons are:
  • Faster cooking, and better results for roasts, soups, stews, etc.
  • Uses less cooking fuel [important when cruising where it isn't conveniently available...]
  • Safer- [e.g., in a seaway] even if used as a regular pot, since the lid locks on
  • Less moisture emitted into boat [quick release using cold water in the sink. No steam plumes this way..]

Pressure cooking is chemistry, and some things need the slow release [e.g., tough meats, beans, etc.] Others require the quick release method [rice, some legumes, etc.]

Our favorite books for pressure cooking are authored by Lorna Sass. She will teach you the science as well as the recipes.

Back to your question about which pressure cooker:
For qualified information about which pressure cooker might be best, check out The Boat Galley [if you haven't already...] Carolyn will answer your questions and those you haven't asked yet... Better yet, buy her cookbook.

I am also a big fan of Thermal cooking and have the smaller [5.5l]Saratoga Jack's model, which we use a lot.

All of the above reasons apply to thermal cooking except faster...

Additionally, we use it to make bread [as you can also do in a pressure cooker] and yogurt...

Best wishes finding what is best for you.

Cheers!

Bill
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Old 27-05-2016, 14:00   #23
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

We have a Fagor at home and on our boat, which we live aboard six or more months of the year.
I've tried others but these are great.
Simple, trustworthy and doubles as a pasta or lobster pot as well.

Stick with the basics.
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Old 27-05-2016, 15:15   #24
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

I have a basic Seb pressure cooker: AuthentiqueÂ*Â*Home & Cook Accessories
I got it with the boat 11 years ago (I have the same at home, my parents have one too). It works perfectly and saves a lot of cooking time and gas.

For releasing the pressure, I just place the cooker on the highest step of the companionway and remove the weighted valve. There is no risk of getting scalded by the jet of steam because the drop in pressure causes a parallel drop in temperature: a few inches above the spout, the steam has condensed in a lukewarm mist.

I prefer a stainless cooker because it resists much better to marine corrosion and to falling from the stove.

IMO, a serious cruiser should have a pressure cooker . This is a question to ask when looking for a position as crew.

Alain
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Old 27-05-2016, 15:21   #25
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

We have a Fagor 10-qt Splendid, which can also be used for pressure canning. It's also induction-capable, if that would be of interest. Thing is brilliant and has never given us any grief. We'll be getting a smaller one as well. It makes the best (and easiest) risotto.
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Old 27-05-2016, 18:39   #26
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

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Originally Posted by reed1v View Post
We may be crazy but think the aluminum issue was debunked a while ago. Of course our memories are deteriorating, but that is probably from the lead goblets we use for our wine.

You're right! You may be crazy. And it's the aluminum doing it.

The sale of aluminum cookware is prohibited in Germany, France, Belgium, Gr. Britain, Switzerland, Hungary and Brazil.

I don't cook on aluminum. Every report I read says the same thing. I'm more than open to being shown the error of my ways...............
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Old 27-05-2016, 19:28   #27
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

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Originally Posted by Strait Shooter View Post
You're right! You may be crazy. And it's the aluminum doing it.

The sale of aluminum cookware is prohibited in Germany, France, Belgium, Gr. Britain, Switzerland, Hungary and Brazil.

I don't cook on aluminum. Every report I read says the same thing. I'm more than open to being shown the error of my ways...............
Just a few quickly found sources putting the alternative view:


ATSDR - Public Health Statement: Aluminum

You cannot avoid exposure to aluminum because it is so common and widespread in the environment.
Exposure to the levels of aluminum that are naturally present in food and water and the forms of aluminum that are present in dirt and aluminum pots and pans are not considered to be harmful.
Eating large amounts of processed food containing aluminum additives or frequently cooking acidic foods in aluminum pots may expose a person to higher levels of aluminum than a person who generally consumes unprocessed foods and uses pots made of other materials (e.g., stainless steel or glass). However, aluminum levels found in processed foods and

foods cooked in aluminum pots are generally considered to be safe.


The safe use of cookware


Aluminum is lightweight, conducts heat well and is fairly inexpensive, making it a popular choice for cooking.
Canadians normally take in about 10 milligrams of aluminum daily, mostly from food. Aluminum pots and pans provide only one or two milligrams of the total. While aluminum has been associated with Alzheimer's disease, there is no definite link proven. The World Health Organization estimates that adults can consume more than 50 milligrams of aluminum daily without harm.




Are Aluminum Pots and Pans Harmful?


Aluminum is the most abundant metal on the surface of the planet; it’s found in water, food, and common medicines such as aspirin and antacids. We ingest a tiny amount daily. If aluminum pots (or copper pots, for that matter) are untreated, they will react to cooking highly acidic foods such as tomatoes or sauerkraut. This may cause corrosion of the surface and allow a minute amount of aluminum to be released, but less than even an aspirin may contain. Aluminum toxicity requires ingesting or inhaling large amounts.

Best Material for Cookware | TakePart

"Aluminum, of course, is the cookware material most often avoided for perceived health risks. Decades ago, a possible link between aluminum and Alzheimer’s disease emerged, but according to the Alzheimer’s Association (where it’s on a list of myths about the disease) and a consensus of medical experts, further studies have failed to confirm that aluminum plays any role in causing Alzheimer’s.And that’s a good thing, too, because unless you live in a bubble, you’re being exposed to aluminum every single day, no matter what cookware you use. The third most common element on Earth, aluminum is naturally found in the soil, and thus a tiny amount finds its way into fruits, vegetables, and meat—organic or not.
Aside from natural sources, aluminum is also present in products such as buffered aspirin, some antacids, antiperspirants, and pickled and processed foods. If you are intent on limiting your exposure, then consider it one more reason to avoid the inner aisles at the supermarket. Compared to those sources, the one to ten milligrams of aluminum we ingest naturally every day is insignificant, as is the amount that will leach out of an aluminum pot into your dinner. According to an account in Cook’s Illustrated (January 2012), lab tests run on tomato sauce cooked in aluminum for two hours, then stored in the same pot overnight, showed that the sauce contained only .0024 milligrams per cup. In contrast, a single antacid tablet may contain more than 200 milligrams. Just contemplating that fact is enough to give me indigestion."
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Old 27-05-2016, 20:12   #28
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

Thank yiu for all the responses. And thank you CF for the usual "controversy " posts.

reed1v: pressure cookers are very safe these days. I think they always were but not everyone pays attention to the instructions. Certainly if you have explosions or melt downs you are doing it wrong....just sayin. But modern pressure cookers have more built in safety features than the pots of the past. Designers have idiot proofed them, so most of us are safe from ourselves!

I was emailing the PO of our boat and she has convinced me to persue canning on board. As I already stated, I have a pressure cooker that I use at home but its lacking features that I want. But seeing that a few of you are happy with your fagor cookers Ill probably go this route so I can get 2 pots, a small one for every day and a larger one for canning and the occassional use for a crowd.
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Old 27-05-2016, 21:02   #29
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

Quote:
Originally Posted by StuM View Post
Just a few quickly found sources putting the alternative view:


ATSDR - Public Health Statement: Aluminum

You cannot avoid exposure to aluminum because it is so common and widespread in the environment.
Exposure to the levels of aluminum that are naturally present in food and water and the forms of aluminum that are present in dirt and aluminum pots and pans are not considered to be harmful.
Eating large amounts of processed food containing aluminum additives or frequently cooking acidic foods in aluminum pots may expose a person to higher levels of aluminum than a person who generally consumes unprocessed foods and uses pots made of other materials (e.g., stainless steel or glass). However, aluminum levels found in processed foods and

foods cooked in aluminum pots are generally considered to be safe.


The safe use of cookware


Aluminum is lightweight, conducts heat well and is fairly inexpensive, making it a popular choice for cooking.
Canadians normally take in about 10 milligrams of aluminum daily, mostly from food. Aluminum pots and pans provide only one or two milligrams of the total. While aluminum has been associated with Alzheimer's disease, there is no definite link proven. The World Health Organization estimates that adults can consume more than 50 milligrams of aluminum daily without harm.




Are Aluminum Pots and Pans Harmful?


Aluminum is the most abundant metal on the surface of the planet; it’s found in water, food, and common medicines such as aspirin and antacids. We ingest a tiny amount daily. If aluminum pots (or copper pots, for that matter) are untreated, they will react to cooking highly acidic foods such as tomatoes or sauerkraut. This may cause corrosion of the surface and allow a minute amount of aluminum to be released, but less than even an aspirin may contain. Aluminum toxicity requires ingesting or inhaling large amounts.

Best Material for Cookware | TakePart

"Aluminum, of course, is the cookware material most often avoided for perceived health risks. Decades ago, a possible link between aluminum and Alzheimer’s disease emerged, but according to the Alzheimer’s Association (where it’s on a list of myths about the disease) and a consensus of medical experts, further studies have failed to confirm that aluminum plays any role in causing Alzheimer’s.And that’s a good thing, too, because unless you live in a bubble, you’re being exposed to aluminum every single day, no matter what cookware you use. The third most common element on Earth, aluminum is naturally found in the soil, and thus a tiny amount finds its way into fruits, vegetables, and meat—organic or not.
Aside from natural sources, aluminum is also present in products such as buffered aspirin, some antacids, antiperspirants, and pickled and processed foods. If you are intent on limiting your exposure, then consider it one more reason to avoid the inner aisles at the supermarket. Compared to those sources, the one to ten milligrams of aluminum we ingest naturally every day is insignificant, as is the amount that will leach out of an aluminum pot into your dinner. According to an account in Cook’s Illustrated (January 2012), lab tests run on tomato sauce cooked in aluminum for two hours, then stored in the same pot overnight, showed that the sauce contained only .0024 milligrams per cup. In contrast, a single antacid tablet may contain more than 200 milligrams. Just contemplating that fact is enough to give me indigestion."


Ya well, I'm not betting my already admittedly diminutive cognitive abilities on it. Nope........not gonna do it until they tell me what DOES cause it. I've lost my Mom to it, my grandmother, and my gf works in a severe dementia facility. It's a wickedly f***ed up disease. One that I'm not going risk if I can avoid it in any way shape or form.
I don't have to cook on aluminum, and won't, it's not hard to do, and there's no reason to, there's plenty of alternatives, i.e., high grade stainless is really the only thing to cook on IMHO.

Didn't "they" tell us that cigarettes were good for us too?
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Old 27-05-2016, 22:01   #30
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Re: Lets revisit pressure cookers

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I have used pressure cookers for about 50 years including the great big retorts used in the food industry. 10 lbs of pressure is the norm. Ten pounds of pressure for one hour will kill even the botuallism bacteria. I keep it simple. Be sure you have some water in the cooker before you close it (the water turns into steam under pressure thus cooking with steam). By placing the 10 lb. weight you know the system is cooking at 10 lbs. (no need for a gauge) because the extra pressure will be released by the weight. When steams begins coming out turn the fire down until it stops. I cook meats, beans, etc. for about two and a half hours. Depending on the toughness of the meats or age of the beans, they might come out two tough or mussy. Increase or decrease the length of time. They last forever. The only problem I have had is the sealing gasket hardens with time and some are no longer available. I get the least expensive, simplest on ebay! I do a lot of cooking at the ranch and on the boat. I have several sizes. It is basic for most of my cooking. I even pressure cook the meat before putting on the BBQ. Cooking time is reduced and it tenderizes. No kitchen should be without one. We even used 5 gallon ones in the restaurant I once had. Customers always wandered why our meats were so tender! Have a nice day.
I use a stainless version that has a flexible lid that drops in while its warped and the screw clamp pulls it shut from the outside making a perfect seal without any gaskets that wear out. It's quick and light and will make a tough old bird's meat just fall off it's bones. There's nothing like pressure cooking. A real propane saver.As far as dealing with the steam press, just shut off the heat and go and have a beer. After a while the pressure is gone and you're ready to eat.I like your method of pre cooking food to tenderize and then BBQ it. It's so mouth watering that way.
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