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Old 20-06-2010, 08:13   #16
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Junk Food / Provisioning

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Originally Posted by Mariness View Post
How many of you pack junk food when you're provisioning? How do you decide how much - and how do you keep it all from disappearing the first 2 days?
Hubby has declared Pop-Tarts and Pringles to be the perfect cruising food ("The foil keeps them dry!") and has actually gone on (need I say all-male) trips where that was in fact the primary diet.
I have therefore told him that his input will no longer be required for provisioning decisions.
But I'm not averse to some junk food, just to living on it exclusively. So what say you - leave it behind, pack some and it's gone when it's gone, or pack some and become a cookie-nazi as you carefully ration out the supply?
Mariness,
I'll add my thoughts here, but first I'd like to point out two things here that some may have forgotten.....

1) That is food, diet, and culinary desires are PERSONAL choices, and while there are pluses and minuses of different choices, these are truly personal choices....
No, this isn't as controversial as "Anchors" or "Blue Water Boats", etc. but I'd like to remind everyone that these are rather personal choices and therefore, in my opinion, are no real "right" or "wrong" answers....


Furthermore, on-board personal food choices will vary in other ways, due to both where you're cruising/voyaging and how your boat is set-up.....
(galley design, ease of cooking, ease of sailing shorthanded, refrigeration, food stuffs storage, etc. etc...)

2) And, don't forget that wonderful words: "Compromise", "living in harmony together".....
You may find that just to insure a pleasant cruise, and live together in harmony, that you'll bring whatever junk food your hubby desires.....


3) And, to detail the aspect of "personal choices"....in my personal opinion, just because I do enjoy a few Oreos with a cool glass of skimmed milk, doesn't mean that I also don't appreciate some British chocolate biscuits with a cup of tea......
Also, just because I might munch on some Pop-Tarts right out of the package, on a late night watch, etc......that doesn't mean that I'd rather not have some fresh baked pastry with starwberry preserves (one of my favs!!)
And, while I'm not a big fan of Pringles, I do eat them occasionally.....but prefer some nice cheese and crackers....

I hope you all see my point here.....
My diet is not compsed of only Oreos and Pop-Tarts, but I do find they have a place in my life.....and that means I DO try to keep some on-board.....



4) Now, Mariness, onto your specific questions.....
Make your decisions based on 3 parameters....(this IS what I do...)
a) what / how much junk food you eat at home....
b) where you're going to be cruising / for how long....
c) how adept are you both (okay maybe just him) on changing your eating habits / desires based on where you're at, and what is available there....

So, since I do like Oreos and Pop-Tarts (and usually so does my crew), and sometimes my crew just needs Pringles (2 of my brothers are true Pringle junkies), I DO bring enough to get us thru long passages, and/or enough to last as long as frozen food (in my 5 cu ft freezer) and fresh food (in my 5 cu ft frig)......
That means I carry as much as a 6 - 7 week supply....and while I do remember that when they're gone~~they're gone....I'm not a "cookie-Nazi".....

Fresh fruit is the tough part here though....as I REALLY DO LOVE fresh apples, bananas, oranges, etc. (yeah, I do carry canned fruit, but nothing beats a nice crisp fresh apple!!!)....
So, on long passages and/or when venturing far flung areas, enjoy the fresh stuff while you have it.....and stock up anywhere you find fresh produce....


5) Mariness, make NO mistake, I'll also bake bread on-board (as needed), and I've done some pastry baking (scratch), but not too good at it.....(Betty Crocker Brownie Mix is really GREAT though!!!)
I also tried to make chocolate mouse (also scratch) a while back.....and yeah, it tasted okay, but looked a bit strange....

And, when in foreign ports and/or doing provisioning in places off-the-beaten-path, I DO use local supplies / local products...and I DO find them to be quite acceptable.....(although I do miss Oreos sometimes!!!)


6) Mariness, please understand that while I am a single male, who LOVES women (but currently don't have a "first-mate" / "admiral"), I don't live like I'm a teenager!!!!
I'd rather cook a nice meal, snack on some nice junk food when availaible, and enjoy local tastes/cultures/deliacies along they way.....

Heck, I LOVE voyaging offshore / cruising in remote places.....but I'm not looking to "drop-off-the-face-of-the-earth", and eat flying fish, hard-tack, and/or granola the rest of my days!!!!


7) Thinking about all of this reminds me of my younger days, cruising with my parents.....
Absolute true story here:
During one of our many cruises....this one (in 1972, I think) from Southern Bahamas thru Martinique, we meet a Dutch couple in the BVI on their converted canal boat, my Dad and I helped them with an engine problem (they didn't sail to windward very well).....a week or so later we connected with them again in St. Marteen (Dutch side, of course)......

It was July 4th and there was a US Navy Ship there (Frigate, Cruiser, etc.????) and the US Navy was going to shoot off a fireworks display.....

Our Dutch friends didn't really grasp what we "yanks" do on Independence Day, but to share the experience (and repay our engine repair assistance), they invited us over for dinner on board.....

I have NO recollection of what we ate for dinner, but desert was a tin of OREO cookies and some fresh milk!!!!
I hadn't had an Oreo or a glass of cold fresh milk in almost a month, and wow was that a really super 4th of July!!!!
Oh, and the US Navy put on a great show too.....but that was almost 40 years ago, I still remember those Oreos!!!!
Still not sure why my Mom wouldn't provision with Oreos....but thesedays, on my own boat, I DO!!!!

(On a side note, my Mom is 89 yrs old tomorrow.....and I'm visiting her right now.....and she confirmed that until their passing on, about 8 years ago, she (and my late father) still corresponded with them via the mail every few months for 30+ years.....so, you see Oreos can truly bridge the waters between nations / cultures.....)



I'm not sure if I answered all of your questions in my long-winded post....but....
In a nutshell, bring what junk food will make you BOTH happy.....eat it a bit sparingly at first (until you get an idea of how/where you can replace it, or adapt to more local snacks), and have fun!!!!

And, for me, on a rough weather night watch, I love M & M's (Dark Chocolate M & M's are my fav!!!)



Fair winds...

John
s/v Annie Laurie
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Old 20-06-2010, 08:35   #17
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I don't carry junk food on board - but that doesn't mean I won't grab it off the shelf in some remote location.
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Old 20-06-2010, 08:45   #18
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Smores. A camping favourite -


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Símores always leave everyone wanting "some more."
That was it!!!!!!!!!!!

S'mores!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


I couldn't understand them 'lil Americans saying this slurred word: s'mores.

Then they said: Grams crackers...

And I'd say "grams"? whatcha mean?

Grams = (yanky) for Grahams <---- 2 syllables

Quote:
A camping favourite - roast the marshmallow
OK I'm smellin that! I love roasting marshellows! I am one of the best in the world - if the had an Olympic sport of camp fire stick roasted marshmellows I would have a fat gold medal. The secret is the stick (don't tell anyone ) the flavour comes from the twig. Get a good eucalypt tree or one a kangaroo has piddled on. thats flavour!!


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Old 20-06-2010, 09:00   #19
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Hahah , kangaroo piddle flavoured smores -now I heard it all . Thanks for the laugh.

Well our plan is thus . The bilge is reserved for wine (small boat mall bilge means priorities.
Luckily Kumgang has not got a sweet tooth except for Dulce de Leche (caramelised milk) which is not junk Food in Argentina . It is the fourth food group ! Other than that it will be one pot cooking as the boat has one burner only at this moment.

My advice re carrying it would be to carry something like chocolate,jam (or peanut butter and jelly for Americans ) to satisfy the sweet tooth. Cruising fare in most cases tends to be high in carbohydrates from grains so I would not add cookies to the mix .
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Old 20-06-2010, 09:42   #20
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The idea of basic provisions excludes comfort, reward or celebration foods. But they are essential.

We sail for pleasure. But even for a working crew, where being at sea is just a job, basic provisions are not enough.

What constitutes this additional category is a matter of individual taste, and its purpose is defeated if someone enforces a different standard, i.e. "there will be no greasy bags of unhealthy calories on MY boat!".

Take whatever it takes to keep everyone happy, and then just a bit more. Pay particular attention to diet restrictions based on health, religion, and philosophical preferences. Rigorously suppress all dietetic missionary zeal! A S'mores person will never survive on carrot sticks, twigs and seeds, or vice versa. If it takes a bilge packed with ammunition cans of Hostess Twinkies for a happy ship, it's a happy ship after all.

irrelevant note: A couple sacks of chips will survive for months in a partially inflated waterproof bag
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:07   #21
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Hahah , kangaroo piddle flavoured smores -now I heard it all . Thanks for the laugh.
Laugh away, the world's most expensive coffee is marinated in Civet Cat droppings. I jest not... Kopi Luwak - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I people will pay for that then kangaroo widdle marshmallows hardly count.
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:08   #22
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A couple sacks of chips will survive for months in a partially inflated waterproof bag
Hit a bag of chips with a hammer till they are crushed and they will last a lot longer.





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Old 20-06-2010, 10:14   #23
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define junk

Well, to some junk is veggies, to others it is McDonald's.

Take what you like to eat and make sure, if it is a long passage, that all the nutrients are there.

As long as the food is a well balanced diet, junk or not, it will serve the purpose.

Our sailing is not like going to school - no more of all the Does&Donts - I say do what you like, eat what you love and be happy.

b.
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Old 20-06-2010, 16:11   #24
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Pringles are great junk food for the boat due to the shape of the can they are packaged in but I noticed that I tired of them quickly. They are just about the only chip you can find South of Puerto Rico all the way to Belize! Also, Being Texan, I love my Dr. Pepper and I only once found it in Grenada....it was about 3-4 bucks a can! We eat pretty healthy though and stayed thin and fit while sailing but I will not try to hide the fact that we indulged in McDonalds when we found one! I did learn to trade my D.P. for Ting. Ting is healthier, refreshing on a hot day and it will mix with almost any clear alcohol for those sun-downers
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Old 20-06-2010, 16:25   #25
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Have one really bad junk food like...potato chips, preferably UTZ. Only on the boat though, not allowed at home
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Old 20-06-2010, 17:33   #26
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Being Texan, I love my Dr. Pepper and I only once found it in Grenada....it was about 3-4 bucks a can! ... I did learn to trade my D.P. for Ting. Ting is healthier, refreshing on a hot day and it will mix with almost any clear alcohol for those sun-downers
If you drop a shot of amaretto into a beer, it tastes just like Dr. Pepper.
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Old 20-06-2010, 18:34   #27
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You either live to eat or eat to live. Junk in =junk out and less time to enjoy things that really matter. No junk food aboard.
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Old 20-06-2010, 18:42   #28
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I can't live without tortilla chips and salsa. I like guacamole, too. I always bring some on board, and it doesn't last long.
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Old 20-06-2010, 18:44   #29
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You either live to eat or eat to live. Junk in =junk out and less time to enjoy things that really matter. No junk food aboard.
I never really get this kind of thinking? Food, some junk included, is some of life's most enjoyable momemts...indulge, with moderation of course
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Old 20-06-2010, 18:47   #30
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When ever I crew aboard......."The Chief" must have !!!! Peanut Butter and Strawberry Preserves...Not Jelly, Not Jam and not Grape.........I can do it on bread/crackers....whatever.

As far as true junk food Pringles...and the individual bags of chips or "crisps" as our bretheren across the pond call them.....Individual pastries, dried fruit and oatmeal.

Nothing is more satisfying than a steaming bowl of oat meal (from individual serving packets0 topped with reconstituted dried fruit when you have the watch at sunrise.

The only bad experience was when I came on watch, to a cockpit full of queasy owners...with my steaming bowl of "glop" which I ate with gusto...the looks as they say were

priceless.
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