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View Poll Results: How Do You Cook Onboard
Don't cook, hope someone else can! 2 0.57%
Grill 46 13.18%
Two Burner 60 17.19%
Burners and Oven 192 55.01%
Pressure Cooker 24 6.88%
Bring food already prepared from home 9 2.58%
Look for Neon Lights Shoreside 9 2.58%
Microwave 7 2.01%
Voters: 349. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-02-2008, 19:08   #181
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Red Charlotte: To what type of camp stove are you referring? The link Morgan Paul posted took me to a part of the MSR website that has a different type of cookware, so I'm curious to know if we're all on the proverbial same page.

My interest is specifically directed toward the MSR Reactor model and the JetBoil system. Their designs are similar and rather unique compared to most camping/backpacking stoves. Both are somewhat self-contained units in which the burner assembly integrates with the "pot." In both instances, the fuel canister and other accessories are designed to pack up snugly in the pot when not in use. Though still a little more vertical than would probably be optimal for stability, the fact that there's no pot held to the top of the stove by gravity alone is a plus.

I guess the main thing I'm wondering is what the durability of these units might be onboard. Since they're not specifically designed for use around saltwater, I'm concerned that the various bits and pieces that control the flame might become fouled quickly.

I dunno... these things both have won tons of awards and usually get great reviews from people who've used them on land.

Jetboil
MSR Mountain Safety Research : Stoves : Reactor™ Fast & Light#reg; Stove
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Old 11-02-2008, 14:22   #182
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I would like to comment on an earlier remark that propane is a safer fuel than alcohol. Not always the case--if you have a propane leak it will sink into the bilge and wait for a spark to blow up your vessel--unless you force-ventillate the bilges as part of your ventillation system. Alcohol fumes are lighter than air and will eventually get out of a portlight or hatch or companionway--unless something ignites them first!

White spirit, or as is sometimes sold benzine, is a good fuel requiring little preheating. These days unleaded petrol is often usesd as an alternative fuel. Coleman used white spirit it a lot in their little pressure camp stoves and mantle lanterns--we all loved them and they are great in the open air. However, there is some chance that benzine can produce liver cancer--the fumes from it that is. Handle it with care and if you spill some wear a carbon filter mask (everyone should carry them aboard in case you have to go below and deal with a fuel leak) until you get all of the fumes and spilled material disposed of. I think white spirit is one of the LAST fuels I would want aboard, especially below decks. Kerosene is safer and diesel safer still--however inconvenient any pre-heating with alcohol might be.

Propane and Butane are very convenient and can be deadly. They are only as safe as the equipment and the installation plumbing, hoses etc. Insurance companies hate propane--it sets fire to more vessels than any other fuel except perhaps petrol (gasoline). Monitoring equipment with LOUD alarms need to be in place and switched on at all times.

Now--back to cooking. I use a propane stove, two burner, also have bought a pressure cooker because of this thread and so far delighted with it. I also have a stainless steel griller which can be bolted to the rails or stood on its own legs--it uses charcoal or compressed anthracite fuel bricks. Not cheap if one used it all the time--I would have to convert it to gas, but it is only ever used to feed the multitude when they come aboard--so only used infrequently.

I have a little twenty dollar butane cartridge portable stove with a grill plate which is used now and again. It is small, but it allows cooking above decks when it is stinking hot, as it often is, just to cook up some meat or a bit of fresh fish for the evening nosh.

When the weather permits use of the galley stove--we do pretty much the same as everyone else.
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Old 11-02-2008, 15:56   #183
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Mike, I'd rather be blown to smithereens by a propane leak than be sent to the burn ward after an invisible alcohol flame washed over me. That's the problem with alcohol, no one notices it spreading and then whoosh, the invisible flame is all of a sudden all over the place.

I haven't tried to check, but I'm told there are more alcohol fires and more damage from then, than from propane and the other "gasses" on boats. And, the extra moisture from alcohol flames is one real nasty way to turn a closed cabin into a sweat box.

Alcohol? Nah, I can live on cold food.<G>
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Old 11-02-2008, 16:09   #184
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I am not suggesting one uses alcohol. I just think it is safer than propane. I myself use propane because it was already in the boat when I bought her. However-- If one wants safety use kerosine--and put up with the smell.
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Old 11-02-2008, 18:20   #185
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So...be dizzy and nauseous and use kerosene?

You know what's coming next, right<G>

No thanks, I'd rather eat cold.<G>

Fortunately I know all sorts of ways of making fire, too.<G>
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Old 12-02-2008, 04:43   #186
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What's the deal with every boat coming with a double sink? I have had both, and if you can only have two tiny sinks in your double, I personally would much prefer a large single, and then I can partition it when needed with a smaller square wash pan, or usually at home I use whatever was used at dinner (salad bowl, pot etc) as the "washing sink" and rinse all at the end in the big sink. The larger sink comes in handy for baking pans, washing a whole chicken, fish etc. Just a point, as they always use that as a selling point, but I don't understand how two undersized sinks are an advantage.
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Old 12-02-2008, 15:01   #187
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I agree about the sink. Far too many galleys on cruising yachts are designed for "look nice" but are useless for preparing any kind of a meal at sea. A good galley and good sleeping facilities are essential.
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Old 21-02-2008, 15:39   #188
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Yeah... I kind of have to wonder after reading some of these posts how rough some of you are "roughing it"?
They have grills and real live kitchen stoves; gas or electric on boats.. have for a while...
Not for nothing but you learn on a boat that anything can happen and to be prepared for all. At least with propane you can smell it leaking when and if it ever does. I don't know about you'alls boats but i always run the engine fans before starting. Regardless. Not doing that is a good way to get a one way ticket about 120 feet in the air dead as a doornail.
I thought that was boating 101.
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Old 25-02-2008, 17:10   #189
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Every cruiser should have a pressure cooker. Saves propane 3X - 5X.
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:32   #190
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Ya gota have a rice cooker. They aint just for rice.... literally any meat brown rice and any veg or noodle and it turns itself off to a 12 hour low setting... all elemental no fire danger.
I love mine.. shrimp all the time n fish n beef n chix n whatever... mmmm
get the biggest one you can swing, make lots and feed everyone. plus leftovers freeze great.
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Old 08-03-2008, 17:08   #191
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Ya gota have a rice cooker.
Hi blonde, you keep singing the praises for a rice cooker. I have a slow cooker (Crockpot). What would be the advantage in switching to a rice cooker?

I love your enthusiasm.

Paul
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Old 08-03-2008, 21:27   #192
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Paul, I confess that "power tools" and gizmos that can only do one job are generally not allowed near my kitchen let alone galley. I still use a manual can opener and the electric drip coffee pot is probably the only other "it only does one thing" critter larger than a major appliance in the room.

But I have some friends with rice cookers. And I confess, you dump in the rice, dump in the water, turn it on and GET LOST. When you come back there's always pretty damn fine rice in the pot. No burned stuff, no raw stuff, no mess boiled over onto the burner...they do an incredibly fine job. If you eat rice twice a week and you don't think "stand around and watch the pot" is your dream job, a rice cooker can be an extreme temptation. And they are way inexpensive in any oriental supermarket. Normally AC-mains electric powered only, but....extreme temptation.
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Old 08-03-2008, 22:52   #193
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Pressure cookers saves fuel. Rice (or chicken and rice) finished in 10 min in a pressure cooker!
Magic.....

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Old 09-03-2008, 00:27   #194
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Steele View Post
Suggestion for cleaning fish while underway. We bought a gray plastic “bussing-bin”. You know – what the guys at the restaurants pick up your dirty dishes in It is about 24” x 14” x 4”. Dirt cheap from Sam’s / Wally-World. If the fish will fit in it, it will keep the decks clean. If the fish is too big, then we just use the side deck and wash the blood down with buckets of seawater. It is a really good idea to run a line through the fish’s gills or tightly around the tail, if you try cleaning it in a rolly sea. You may go overboard but you certainly don’t want to lose that fish!!
I like the bus tray and I agree with tying everything off in case it goes overboard.

But I also say wear metal mesh gloves.

The odds might be low but the consequences could be high; stitches can ruin your day.
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Old 09-03-2008, 00:53   #195
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Originally Posted by cat man do View Post
This is the bit that send's the "Moonshiners" mad, send's em blind, and makes you're arm's drop off.

Dave
Also known as wood alcohol, and one of the key ingredients in a drink I concocted years ago as a bartender.

1 oz Wood Alcohol and 1-1/2 oz. Milk of Magnesia. Serve on the rocks.

I called it the **** And Go Blind.
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