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Old 04-05-2008, 16:56   #16
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Cutlery?

Any thoughts on buying a S/S steel cutlery set or would a normal set be adequate?

Cheers
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Old 04-05-2008, 17:00   #17
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Any thoughts on buying a S/S steel cutlery set or would a normal set be adequate?

Cheers
Normal, high quality cutlery is just fine. I have a nice set of Henckles from the 90's (when I used to be one of those six figure guys...lol) that holds up fine. I keep them in their wooden block and they have never rusted even a little bit. They even survive well in salt water dish washing sessions. Just don't put them away wet. They rust on dry land if you do that.
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Old 01-07-2008, 06:59   #18
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Make sure that the pressure cooker is stainless steel with all stainless steel component parts, salt air an the sea don't mix, you'll be ok for a month or 3 but if a seal goes under pressure you could blow up the galley or do some really bad damage to your yacht. This has happened in the past to some boat owner or so I read.
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Old 01-07-2008, 20:26   #19
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I would keep what i could but if you have to downsize a mount of clothing I will quote on that from sailing on a micro budget copy i have, a few pairs of swim trunks( basic wardrobe), some comftorble shorts(youll live in these), several sets of underpants( for after showers on land will feel great), some comfortable long pants( light color old for work), some old white shirts (for after your sunburned), some white socks ( also after your sunburned and a nice pair), large sweatshirt to keep from being woken up by the sun, a floppy hat, good sunglasses to reduce glare, old sneakers for working, good shoes for shoretime, rain gear, and finally a reslly nice set ofclothes to cut a yachty figre and make someone wan't you dock at their place for the night.
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Old 02-07-2008, 04:36   #20
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UL Warns of Potentially Hazardous Pressure Cookers
Innova 8 QT Pressure Cooker, Ultrex II, Model 11453 C
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UL | UL Warns of Potentially Hazardous Pressure Cookers
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Old 02-07-2008, 07:16   #21
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Your profile and blog don't shed much light on your lifestyle preferences, but here goes:

If your boat is going to be your home, some comfortable amenities are good. You won't find artificial flowers or much in the way of "decor" on Sunspot Baby, but if you have a nice small rug, I'd bring it along. Family or favorite photos - ours are in expensive looking coordinating frames from the Dollar Tree, stuck up with mounting squares. Small sofa type pillows make good extra bedding and to prop up when reading. And those great old nautical books you read to whet your appetite for buying a boat are good to save and re-read at anchor.

On the last cruise we brought along a small plastic step from home (just one plastic step, not a multi step stool - available at Wal-Mart, Home Depot, etc. We drilled a hole and ran an 8 ft. line with a stop knot in it. When tied to a floating dock (even for fueling), sometimes it's a long way down. Tie the bitter end to the lifeline, and as you step up and pull away, you haul it in. Weighs practically nothing, and stored upside takes up hardly any space.

A small atlas. Nice for road information, but one with counties is good to have on hand for VHF weather reports that are often forecast by county.

Wok. Stacks conveniently under other cookware and can be used for a multitude of things. Bring along the wok tools, too. And don't use the brass "spider" to strain paint.

We haul our small pressure cooker along each cruise, but don't use it much. Last cruise I brought the rice cooker - it is very lightweight and cooks quickly, but you do need 110 to run it.

Harriett, our Tupperware salt & pepper shaker lids have broken their retainer straps and can't find new shakers like this anywhere. If you see them can you let me know where? Thanks.

And speaking of Tupperware, save it all. You can use it to store tools, medications, clothing, etc. Square is better than round for storage reasons. If you have a label maker, don't get rid of it.

Rags. Cleaning Supplies. Some good extension cords (indoor and out). Flashlights - one for each cabin.

Drill, Sander, Saw, Dremel and accessories, basic tools, funnels (for mechanical issues and for the galley), sewing kit, various goo and glue.

Of course this is the tip of the iceberg. Get a used copy of My Old Man and The Sea. There's an extensive list starting on p. 142 of everything that went on their boat. Not suggesting that you get or save all this stuff, however.

Good luck - sounds like fun!

Entlie
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Old 02-07-2008, 08:14   #22
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Entlie,

I found the shakers at Tupperware | Tupperware - the official World Web Site for Tupperware Products under the "classic" heading.

BTW, if you are going to be in the Wilmington area this summer, give us a shout. We will be settling into our new townhouse except when we are visiting our new granddaughter in Alexandria, VA.
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Old 02-07-2008, 08:32   #23
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The boat will be your home. Bring everything there is room for, and over time you will adjust to make things fit, or throw them out..................
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Old 02-07-2008, 11:01   #24
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Harriet, thanks for the Tupperware link, and we'll keep Wilmington in line. If you're passing through New Bern, please do the same.

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Old 02-07-2008, 13:36   #25
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Check your stainless items with a magnet. Magnetic stuff rusts like hell in the tropics.
12 volt rechargeable tools can be plugged into your main battery.
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Old 02-07-2008, 14:30   #26
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<snip>
Bring along the wok tools, too. And don't use the brass "spider" to strain paint.
I'm getting a mental image of just how you know this, Entlie, with George playing a prominent role . . .

Quote:
And speaking of Tupperware, save it all. You can use it to store tools, medications, clothing, etc. Square is better than round for storage reasons.
And, Tupperware has other "interesting" uses, as well. Check out:

No More Company...EVER.

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Old 02-07-2008, 18:29   #27
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Old 01-08-2008, 15:32   #28
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Handy galley tools

You've received some excellent advice so far, I think.

Definitely keep the pressure cooker, and also buy a couple of dozen half-pint, or pint sized canning jars with spare lids so you can take advantage of good buys at native markets along the way, and to have back-up food in case of a passage that takes longer than intended, or the native stores didn't have what you needed.

Consider bringing along an immersion blender rather than one of those huge kitchen counter top models like Sunbeam and Black & Decker. Get a 400 watt model with 3 speeds. I recommend the Russell Hobbs model. It comes with blending paddles, a whisk, and a bladed food processor for chopping everything from meat to veggies. I run mine off a 400 watt portable inverter.

A heavy Chinese cleaver is great for dismembering chicken, chopping spare ribs, and cracking lobster carapaces. And finally, a microplane grater for zesting all those lemons and limes you will be using with fish and seafood recipes, as well as grating chocolate, fresh Parmesan cheese, and garlic. And thinking about grating things, that Tupperware grater that comes with two different grating surfaces and are attached to a catcher with handle.

Fair winds and safe harbors,

Robbie

P.S. Oh yeah, you might want to get a copy of the cookbook, Gourmet Underway - A Sailor's Cookbook. Great sailboat recipes for your pressure cooker! See the website at www.gourmetunderway.com.
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Old 01-08-2008, 15:50   #29
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Would a vacuum bagger for stowing food make any sense?
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Old 01-08-2008, 16:22   #30
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Vacuum Baggers

I must confess to having never used a vacuum bagger on board.

It is definitely NOT an essential tool for ocean voyagers. That said, it could prove useful in removing moisture/air in dry mixes, for instance, like pancake mixes, flour, corn meal, and maybe cereals like oatmeal.

The thing is, most dry ingredients are so common to all cooking no matter what port you may be calling on, and are also so cheap relatively speaking, that there really is no reason to have such large quantities aboard for such long period of times that that kind of protection is necessary.

It is my understanding that the vacuuming process is most valuable when used in conjunction with a refrigerator or freezer. Most fresh ingredients do not do well when stored in plastic unless placed in a cooler or refrigerator.

In practical terms, there really is no need to stock a boat for more than a month and a half. There are no legs of a voyage between ports that require a longer passage time, unless foul weather and other circumstances occur. By and large, most food can be kept without vacuum-sealing. Certainly our sea-faring ancestors around the globe have done quite well without it.

My opinion, only. Hope this helps.

Robbie
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