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Old 29-02-2008, 12:58   #1
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Galley Belt

Hi:

I'm getting ready for my trip from Astoria OR to SF. In going over the safety gear that I want to have on the boat I want one of those belts that hold people in place when they are using the stove. What is the name of those belts? Where can you buy them? I tried the defender catalogue but cold not find it.
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Old 29-02-2008, 13:13   #2
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Charlie,

You can fabricate one for a length of 2" wide dracron webbing. Put a large grommet eye in each end and use a caribiner to hook into attachment points in the galley. The rig should be able to support your weight as you lean to leeward when cooking. This well be a secure means to work and free your hands and you won't be worry about maintaining your balance. Use strong well secured pad eyes!
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Old 29-02-2008, 13:13   #3
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I do not like them. If a pot flies I want to fly faster. If you fall down you get trapped against the stove. I really think it's a 50/50 proposition of it doing you more harm than good. two snap hooks and a length of webbing might be better since the tether points on each boat may be different.
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Old 29-02-2008, 13:16   #4
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Sine each installation will be somewhat "custom", I'd think you should build your own chef's support, or galley harness.
I through-bolted two eye-bolts into the galley cabinetry, & had a short hoisting sling (1" nylon) fabricated c/w snap-hooks - about $25 total).
We seldom bothered to use it.
It;s a bit of a Hobbs choice, as Paul noted.
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Old 29-02-2008, 14:01   #5
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I was wondering about the getting out of the way problem. I have a nice stout rail that runs across the front of the stove where I can attach. A couple of caribiners would work well. I imagine there are times when it would be real helpful and others when it would not work at all.
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Old 29-02-2008, 14:05   #6
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Do it yourself

We made our own using seatbelt webbing, some snap clips, padeyes, etc. Also made a bar for the front of the stove to keep from being thrown into the stove. Made that out of a piece of teak and dinghy rudder gudgeon and pintles so it could be removed.

If you are going to do any cooking at sea, beyond opening a can, the belt and stove bar are invaluable. They let you use both hands to prepare food which is way more a safety factor than any danger from being strapped in in front of the stove. Wonder if those that are against cooking safety belts have actually tried to cook at sea.

If conditions are so bad that a pot is in danger of being launched off the stove, we used a single burner sea swing stove. The u-joint gimbal of those stoves make them ideal for cooking when it's really rough. We had that stove was mounted on the bulkhead next to the stove but on the opposite/dinette side. Could use it strapped in at the galley without fear of flying hot liquids.
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Old 29-02-2008, 14:23   #7
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You want 2 attachment points. Don't use the crash bar in from of the cooker to attach the belt. You don't want the carabiners to slide.

Another neat thing for cooking underway is to fabricate a small cutting block which you cut grooves into the bottom to allow it to fit on and be held by the grate on the gimbaled cooker.

You can use this gimbaled cutting board for food prep when heeled, cutting etc. and for supporting a cup of bowl when pouring liquids or any food. Fiddles will only do so much and don't work well for steep heels.
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Old 29-02-2008, 14:38   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roverhi View Post
W... Wonder if those that are against cooking safety belts have actually tried to cook at sea ...
Although not "against" Safety Belts"(I fitted one), I (as "passage cook") found enough security in leaning against the aft 1/2 bulkhead (sink return), as I needed in (even) boisterous conditions.
I'd recommend fitting a belt, without prejudice against not actually using it.
The stove's "crash bar" is essential, and separate from the belt.
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Old 29-02-2008, 14:49   #9
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Tying yourself down in front of the galley stove is not what you want to do, especially in a seaway. I have seen more thank one crew/cook scalded when a pot came flying off the stove top, even with retainers to hold the pots in place. (The one burner sea-swing stove is a good sugggestion on this count!) Never-the-less, most of us want to use something that one can brace ones self against so that one can use two hands.

On our boat we have a "kidney brace" belt of the type used by people working in warehouses, on loading docks, etc. This has a d-ring added on the front and a second one on the back. These can be attached to a short tether which is itself attached to a pad-eye with a snap-shackel. We have one pad-eye next to the stove and a second on the side of the counter across from the stove. With the tether, one can either lean back and be supported from the front or forward and be supported by the back (depending upon what tack one is on), and yet the tethers disallow one to be thrown into the stove itself and don't prohibit one from jumping aside if a pot does go adrift.

Something else. Aboard our boat whomever is working in the galley is required to wear sea-boots and a full length rubberized bib type apron if they are cooking underway in anything but extremely light weather. We also alway trys to use pots with lock-down lids--even the frying pan has a lock-down screen top. It is simply too easy to loose ones balance due to an errant sea or wake, especially when two hands are needed for a pot of pasta or soup.

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:03   #10
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Thanks everyone. Wonderful ideas.
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Between us there was, as I have already said somewhere, the bond of the sea. Besides holding our hearts together through long periods of separation, it had the effect of making us tolerant of each other's yarns -- and even convictions. Heart of Darkness
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Old 29-02-2008, 15:23   #11
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Lock down lid?

svHyLyte,
Can you tell us more about your "lock down lids",
Thanks,
Chris
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Old 01-03-2008, 12:27   #12
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Lock Down Lids

We have several different sized pressure cookers-2 qt, 4-qt and 6 qt (US weights)--with locking lids that we've picked up along the way. One can use them with or without the gaskets and or "jiggler" weights. The frying screen is just an old stainless frying-pan screen to which I added a couple of tabs cut from thin stainless sheet metal with a couple of #10 machine screws. The tabs slip into the lock slots on the top edge of the 2 qt pan. Mostly that just keeps the screen from going adrift when one is trying to fry up a couple of eggs or potatoes and onions for breakfast.

I should also admit that we've recently added a small Origo microwave oven that I picked up at a scratch and dent sale for $45.00. It fits right into a slightly modified locker above our refrigerator and we run it off the power from an inverter. When the sea is up, it's good for heating up pre-made one dish meals that my wife makes up and stores in "FoodSaver" vacuum bags.

Cheers,

s/v HyLyte
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Old 01-03-2008, 22:33   #13
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