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Old 03-10-2005, 23:10   #1
Kai Nui
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Foul Weather Meals

Any suggestions for rough weather meals? We like to put a couple of potatos in to bake on cold nights. Warms the cabin, and makes a great hand warmer, as well as a easy to eat snack while wedged in the companionway. They will sit in the oven and stay warm for hours after they are baked.
We have tried soup, but it fouls up the spout on the thermos unless it is just broth, and I do not like broth. I have tried a regular thermos, but I always end up wearing half of it when it is rough.
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Old 04-10-2005, 02:12   #2
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if you wrap the baked potatoe in aluminium foil after cooking, they will stay hot for much longer.

Pot noodles are good

personally prefer to have hot soup and normally use a packet for soup in a cup. A few cold chicken thighs to chew on keep me going happily.
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Old 04-10-2005, 05:37   #3
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cooker

On board Makai we use a thermal cooker. You just bring whatever to a boil on the stove and place it in the thernal carafe to stay hot for 6 hours or to continue cooking.

On passages or in rough weather we have plenty of hot food without someone spending time in the galley.
It also saves fuel.

We eat pretty well this way and the Cap has had no complaints
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Old 04-10-2005, 09:59   #4
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I love cup of soup. Good stuff. That's what I would have. And some French bread. And maybe some beef jerky.

For desert. I would have a granola bar, or pudding.

To drink. Water. Maybe some milk. Nothing acidic. Cause it'll upset your stomach. And wah-la. You'll get sick. (Seasick)?

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Old 04-10-2005, 18:50   #5
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The packet in a cup has been pretty successful, but the iossue with soup is you can not set it down, and invariably, if I am on watch, as soon as a cup is made, I will have to make a sail change, or tack, or something that requires both hands. I have tried a thermos so I can have it at a moments notice, but as I mentioned, pouring on 20' seas is a problem. I am thinking one hand, hot non spill things. Day time is no problem, but at night, the watches can get really long. Especially with the weather we regularly have in this part of the pacific.
THe graola bars are standard fair on my boat. Quick substance, and I like the french bread idea. We always have the Cup-O-Soup things on board, but you are stuck until you finish it.
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Old 04-10-2005, 23:06   #6
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Yeah. You're right about the hot soup probably spilling all over the place. And possibly onto you as well.

Potatoe chips might work. But, they're not that nutrists. (Healthy Like)

If it's morning time. Oatmeal might do the trick. Especially, if it's really thick.

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Old 04-10-2005, 23:30   #7
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That is a great idea. The way I make it, you need a knife. No worry about spilling.
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Old 04-10-2005, 23:41   #8
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OK, here are some criteria.
Must be hot food
Must be easy to prepare, or easy to keep ready
Must be filling (no rice cakes, yuck)
Must be finger food
Must be easy to store
Nothing sweet
Nothing too spicy
And, I do not have a microwave.
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Old 04-10-2005, 23:56   #9
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Maybe a burrito might do the trick. You can store it in a chill box or refrigerator. And can be heated up in a oven. Or you can fry it in oil. That is finger food and hot!!

I suppose a Hot Pocket might work too. Without a microwave. I remember seeing something on a box a while back, saying oven directions. You could try those out?

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Old 04-10-2005, 23:59   #10
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Good stuff stateside, hard to get other places, at least prepackaged. Frijolis, and tortias are a good staple, and definitely on the menu.
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Old 05-10-2005, 05:30   #11
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We cryovac precooked stews,soups and meals when we want to reheat them we just place bag and all in a pot of hot water for 7min. Then you cut the courner and squeeze into a bowl/plate ready to eat.Use water for cuppa and clean up.Cryovacs are great as extend the length of time food can be stored for eg:dryed pasta or rice 5yrs,cooked meals 10-15days,soup6-10days. greg
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Old 05-10-2005, 07:19   #12
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Porridge

Porridge - or Oatmeal as it is know to some of my colonial cousins was used in very different ways to what happens now. My ancestor used to make large batches, eat it hot when cooked, the remained was poored in to a lined draw. When cool it was cut into slices and eaten cold during the first day. After that slices were fried in a pan (from memory it was called skirley (sp?) my prefrences was when it was fried after bacon.


also see
http://www.rampantscotland.com/recip...e_porridge.htm

Paul
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Old 06-10-2005, 18:44   #13
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Just the meal for bad weather.

Kai,

I have two suggested meals that can be prepared underweigh and in bad weather. One is hot, one is not. The first is peanut butter and jelly (cold meal) the other is peanut butter and jelly on toast (hot meal).
Some years ago, I was doing a delivery from New England to the Chesapeake in early November. When we rounded Montauk, the seas were on our stern at 8-10 feet. The first day out was rough to say the least and cooking was out of the question. I was designated to be the duty cook. I made ham and cheese sandwiches for several meals. When the seas calmed to where I could cook properly, I supplied the crew with their first hot meal in a couple of days, ham and cheese on toasted english muffins. They were thrilled.
Your crew can be also with the proper presentation.
Jim
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Old 06-10-2005, 19:13   #14
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Good suggestions. The cryovac idea is great! Oatmeal, as I mentioned earlier is great for those cold mornings, and PB&J is a staple. I am not much for toasted, but in general, it is one of my favorite snacks. The key to a good PB&J is good peanut butter. I grew up on Giant brand. The stuff out here on the left coast just does not compare. When was in Cleveland a few months back, I stocked up at a Tops (affiliate to Giant). Should have seen me trying to stuff 6 jars into my luggage That was the first time my wife had ever tried the stuff, and now she is hooked too.
Some people are wine conessuers, I am a peanut butter conessueer
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Old 07-10-2005, 02:04   #15
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And the peanut butter can be dressed up with a few strips of crisp bacon (pre-cooked, before departure).
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