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Old 29-11-2014, 06:37   #16
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

Canadian wheat (descended from the Ukrainian Halychanka variety, or Red Fife) makes the finest flour in the world.
The better flours on British grocery shelves proudly advertise that they are made from Canadian wheat.
"Buy French" movements in France have been trying to persuade French bread makers to switch from Canadian to French flour, but the bakers haven't budged.

The following table compares some of the differences in Flour grinds and blends in different countries.

Canada
All-purpose: 100% hard wheat. Can be used for anything.
Bread Flour: Exceptionally high gluten Flour made for commercial bakeries.

America
All-purpose: 75% hard and 25% soft. Not recommended for bread.
Bread Flour: High gluten content for home bread-making; equivalent of Canadian all-purpose.

UK
Plain Flour: Not recommended for bread.
Bread Flour: High gluten content for home bread-making; equivalent of Canadian all-purpose. Also called "strong Flour".

More info’ ➥ From a single seed - Tracing the Marquis wheat success story in Canada to its roots in the Ukraine (8*of*11) - Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)
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Old 29-11-2014, 06:54   #17
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

wonder became bimbo bread and is alive and well all over mexico.. yukkkkk.
i love the bolilos made in some womans kitchen and brought around for sale in tiendas..delicious. as is the french baguettes we can get from frenchbaker. yummmm
because of reynauds disease and the complications i meet with that challenge, i have been advised by mds to eat the yukky crappy white bread--- so i use the best tasting stuff i can find, leaving bimbo for the grilled cheese.
i use bolillos when i am in a sammich mood
i found the flours are different in flavor, and certain ones are lovely-- italian and french bakers use a lovely flour with excellent flavor.
not all white breads are alike.
i remember arnold brick oven white-- THE best by far manufactured bread, and was delivered to our house in a truck. so was pepperidge farm, back in the day.
arnold was hands down a better flavored bread. best consistency and flavor. just like home made.
yummmmmy.
in caribbean, esp, stthomas, in publix, i found lovely like home made bread for a very reasonable price by looking down... find it on bottom shelf. much less pricey and more flavorful than the old manufactured breads for 6.95 per loaf from orowheat. the beautiful like home made loaf i found was only 1.95 usd... as oppoosed to the 6.95 for orowheat... pays to look below the top shelf.
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Old 29-11-2014, 08:05   #18
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

The colonial era and globalization have had some interesting effects on breads world wide. For example, during the colonial era the British brought eastern Indians into Belize as laborers. Today, especially around Punta Gorda, there are many of Indian decent. As a result, I had some pretty tasty Roti Paratha (?) at a little lunch stand in PG recently, along with some good curry chicken, quite a pleasant surprise.

Traditional breads in Central America are typically quite bland...mostly corn tortillas. But there are a few ladies here on the Rio who make delicious coconut bread (much coconut bread is rather bland, but theirs is delicious..esp when still fresh and warm).

"Fry Jacks" are a common Belizean bread. Popular for breakfast. Just basically a fried puffed up tortilla. Sometimes stuffed. Tasty mostly because they are fried I think.

In Belize you also encounter "Johhny" or "Journey" cake. Similar to the old traditional "hard tack" biscuits of British origin, made for sea journeys. I think "journey" morphed into "johnny", but in Belize you hear sort of a slurred blending of the two words...sort of like "jourhnny" cake. Similar in the Bahamas too.

In Guatemala there were a lot of European imigrants from the mid 1800's forward. They brought their idea of bread with them. The current influx of foreigners maintains a small market for these heartier breads...you can get them on the Rio, in the City, and in some of the more popular tourist/expat venues.

We also get Bimbo (Mexican) products here in Guatemala. A traditional tortilla will go stale and stiff in less than a day. I think you could leave a Bimbo tortilla laying out on the dock for at least a week and it would still be soft...must be loaded with preservatives.
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Old 29-11-2014, 08:16   #19
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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Originally Posted by triciarob View Post
I love bread. By far the best bread I've had was in Turkey, where you buy large flat loaves, still warm, that just cry out to be torn into pieces and stuffed straight into your mouth. I miss Turkish bread.

Here in Malaysia, good bread is hard to find as they don't typically eat bread here and most of the bread is overloaded with sugar. I make my own bread and usually put oats and/or bran into it to make it more interesting.

I sometimes make crumpets, however the recipe I use comes from Deliah Smith and uses yeast as opposed to soda. This is it!

10fld oz milk (275ml), 2fld oz water (55ml), 1tsp caster sugar, 1tbs dried yeast, 1tsp salt, butter for greasing.

You need a thick based frying pan and some egg cooking rings.

First of all heat the milk and water together in a small saucepan till had hot. Then pour into a jug, stir in the sugar and dried yeast and leave in a warm place for 10/15mins till there is a good frothy head on it.

Meanwhile sift flour and salt into a mixing bowl, make a well in the centre and, when yeast mix is frothy, pour it all in. Use a wooden spoon to work the flour into the liquid gradually, and beat well at the end to make a perfectly smooth batter. Cover the basin with a tea towel and leave to stand in a warm place for about 45mins, by which time the batter will have become light and frothy.

To cook: Grease the insides of the egg rings well and grease the frying pan before putting over medium heat. Arrange the rings in the frying pan and when the pan is hot spoon 1tbsp of the crumpet batter into each ring. Let them cook for about 4 or 5mins: the first tiny bubbles will appear on the surface and then, suddenly, they will burst leaving the traditional holes. Now take a spoon and fork, lift off the rings and turn the crumpets over. Cook crumpets on the second side for about 1min only. Regrease and reheat pan and rings before cooking next batch. Serve immediately, generously buttered or, if reheating, toast lightly on both sides.

Makes about 12.

Still no substitute for Turkish bread tho.
Turkish bread -- lavash -- is lovely. It's apparently Armenian or Georgian originally. It's best of all in Georgia -- where there is a traditional bakery on every corner -- a tiny ancient domed little hut where they make Lavash on a wood fire. Now that is delicious. And you can get this all over the Former Soviet Union, wherever there's a Georgian diaspora. Apparently they eat it in Iran as well (I've never been there so can't say for sure).
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Old 29-11-2014, 08:22   #20
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
How interesting it seems to me, that with all the globalization going on, and convergence of everything, including cooking, that profound differences in breads continues so much unabated. I bet some of the culinarily inclined among us might shed some light on the reasons for this.

I've just had a midnight snack, on board, of crumpets and Golden Shred marmelade, and I can't quite get my mind around how the same people who produce the most ghastly bread in the world -- tied for worst with the bread of my own people, the Yankee nation -- soft and tasteless, no texture, no flavor, irrespective of whether white or brown -- could produce something as divine as the Crumpet.

This bread -- which I never quite realized was a real thing -- it always seemed like a joke, invented for the phrase "tea and crumpets" -- is like a small, thick pancake, made with lots of soda. I eat them on board with cream cheese and ham, with sour cream and caviar (when generous guests bring that), or simply with butter and marmelade, like tonight.

Why the English people, with access to such a delicious thing, would eat their own sawdust-like normal bread at all, is beyond my comprehension. My own people probably preserved, fiercely, their own traditions of hot, home-made bread on the table, because of the same problem. We had "Wonder Bread", of course, and Peppridge Farms Wheat Berry so-called Whole Wheat bread (hardly different from Wonder Bread in texture), but we consumed far more biscuits and cornbread, both, like Crumpets, heavily leavened, and full of texture and flavor (the guilty secret of delicious biscuits being -- lard). The only difference being that you had to make your own biscuits and cornbread, whereas Crumpets can be bought for 65p a package, at Sainsburys, or anywhere else in the UK.

Why cannot the English-speaking peoples produce edible bread? I am really puzzled by this. We are so ingenious at everything else. The first thing we do when tying up at Cherbourg is to rush off to the nearest boulangerie -- to buy the production there, which is made as if of an entirely different substance -- what, can't we buy the same flour over here? I don't understand. Is it the gluten content? Hard wheat? What's the difference, and why don't we have it? Even the stolid Germans have delicious bread -- adding different grains to the good, hard, flavorful wheat the French use. And the Russians make fabulous bread -- "black bread", dirt cheap, made from rye like many German breads, but with a different and incredibly pleasing flavor.

It must be the wheat. I remember the case when the U.S. and Canadians sold the Soviet Union a huge quantity of wheat at a knock-down price to help ease their latest production crisis -- must have been in the early '80s. I remember being shocked to read that the Soviets considered the delivered wheat to be inedible, and fed it to their cattle! What ingrates, I thought. But now I know better!!
Hot crumpets, butter and Marmite. A Slice of Cheddar on the side.
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Old 29-11-2014, 08:24   #21
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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Hot crumpets, butter and Marmite. A Slice of Cheddar on the side.
nothing like a bit of crumpet on the side
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Old 29-11-2014, 09:42   #22
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

I was once told by an artisan baker that the variations of bread qualities worldwide really has all to do with the various strains of baker's yeast and how they develop regionally. Of course fresh flour and other ingredients are key as well.
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Old 29-11-2014, 10:15   #23
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

Ahhh, Bimbo bread. We purchased our 1 and only loaf in Cabo, stowed it in the forepeak and promptly forgot about while we spent the next month or so meandering down to PV. When "rediscovered" if was as soft and white as when purchased. No hint of decay by any description. No taste test either though, strangely neither of us had the urge. It didn't glow in the dark.....at least not enough to keep us awake.
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Old 29-11-2014, 10:51   #24
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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Hot crumpets, butter and Marmite. A Slice of Cheddar on the side.
And hold the Marmite!
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Old 29-11-2014, 10:52   #25
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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nothing like a bit of crumpet on the side
Are you confusing crumpets with strumpets, perchance?
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Old 29-11-2014, 11:15   #26
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

Love that cute little guy.
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Old 29-11-2014, 11:19   #27
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

I think parts of subjective "bread quality" are 3 fold- gluten and yeasts as mentioned but thirdly- protein level.North africa-Morroco around to Turkey
only buy bulk high protein wheat.This includes the French also.
Protein


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Old 29-11-2014, 11:25   #28
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

Gluten is a composite protein, so I guess it stands to figure high protein equals high gluten?
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Old 29-11-2014, 12:04   #29
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

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nothing like a bit of crumpet on the side
Hot crumpet...with butter. ;-) ;-)
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Old 29-11-2014, 12:28   #30
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Re: Breads of Different Countries

Bread is so much like boating: lots of alternatives and they have even written books about it!

PS and all the answers are on the internet, too.
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