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Old 18-01-2011, 09:16   #1
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Bread on Stovetop. Pressure Cooker or Not?

I have been following the pressure cooker threads lately and found that there are many inquiries regarding baking bread in a pressure cooker.
As mentioned in the more recent threads it seems like if you take the seal out to bake bread then it’s no different then any other pot in a similar configuration. True?
If you “bake” with the seal and water in then it’s really steaming. True?
Steaming bread does not seem as good as baking it if you like the crust.
It would be great if all options and suggestion for bread baking on stovetop to be discussed in this thread.
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Old 18-01-2011, 10:26   #2
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I like stovetop (frying pan) flatbreads. Simple, minimal ingredients (flour, oil, salt). cooks up quick and easy. Just make a dough, let it sit for a bit, then fry it up as flat or thick as you want. make roll-up style sammies or sop up your runny eggs with it

Do a google search for flatbread recipes, you'll find a few thousand variation but the principal is all the same.
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Old 18-01-2011, 10:40   #3
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I've not yet made bread in a pressure cooker, but many, many times in a dutch oven. The shape can be a little weird and the crust is a bit chewier but it works.
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Old 18-01-2011, 10:43   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmecrazy View Post
I like stovetop (frying pan) flatbreads. Simple, minimal ingredients (flour, oil, salt). cooks up quick and easy. Just make a dough, let it sit for a bit, then fry it up as flat or thick as you want. make roll-up style sammies or sop up your runny eggs with it

Do a google search for flatbread recipes, you'll find a few thousand variation but the principal is all the same.
Mix in yoghurt and it makes great roti's
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:15   #5
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Mix in yoghurt and it makes great roti's
ok, I'll bite...what the heck are "roti's"?
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:18   #6
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roti is another name for Chapati
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:19   #7
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when you get to the islands where there are people from India you will find out soon enough! mmmmmmm good.
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:28   #8
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Its a cross between a Chapati and a Naan bread....
Parhattas are also nice.... basically roll out your flat bread, smear lightly with butter then sprinkle some cooked mince or lentils on... fold in half and repeat then fold and roll flat as possible without popping it all through or outa the sides.... throw a knob of butter in a hot skillet and fry for a min or so till it bubbles/swells... then flip and do other side.
Without the filling (mince) it makes a great breakfast with a large mug of tea...
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:30   #9
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Its a cross between a Chapati and a Naan bread....
Parhattas are also nice.... basically roll out your flat bread, smear lightly with butter then sprinkle some cooked mince or lentils on... fold in half and repeat then fold and roll flat as possible without popping it all through or outa the sides.... throw a knob of butter in a hot skillet and fry for a min or so till it bubbles/swells... then flip and do other side.
Without the filling (mince) it makes a great breakfast with a large mug of tea...
Oh... mix is 50%white, 50%unrefined flour
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Old 18-01-2011, 11:55   #10
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roti is another name for Chapati
Aha!
[QUOTE=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chapati] Chapatis are one of the most common forms in which wheat, the staple of northern South Asia, is consumed. Chapati is a form of roti (bread). The words are often used interchangeably. While roti refers to any flat unleavened bread, chapati is a roti made of whole wheat flour and cooked on a tava (flat skillet).

[QUOTE=http://indianfood.about.com/od/breadrecipes/ig/How-to-Make-Chapatis/]
How To Make Chapatis

Chapatis (Indian flatbread) are the perfect accompaniment to most Indian dishes. Learn how to make them with this step-by-step photo tutorial on making Chapatis. Don't be fooled by the number of steps there are in this tutorial because making a single Chapati from start to finish, takes 1 1/2 to 2 minutes at the most! Chapatis are not difficult to make but the old saying "Practice makes perfect" was probably written for them. All you need is:
  • 2 cups wholewheat flour
  • Water (Using yoghurt or milk will give you super soft Chapatis! See tip below)
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 tbsps vegetable/ canola/ sunflower cooking oil
This recipe makes roughly 12 Chapatis.

This stuff is making me hungry! I will deftinitely give the 'roti's' a try..
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Old 18-01-2011, 15:46   #11
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Originally Posted by Ofer View Post
I have been following the pressure cooker threads lately and found that there are many inquiries regarding baking bread in a pressure cooker.
As mentioned in the more recent threads it seems like if you take the seal out to bake bread then it’s no different then any other pot in a similar configuration. True?
If you “bake” with the seal and water in then it’s really steaming. True?
Steaming bread does not seem as good as baking it if you like the crust.
It would be great if all options and suggestion for bread baking on stovetop to be discussed in this thread.
You're right that by removing the seal and 'baking' (vs. pressure cooking/steaming) you are effectively using a normal pot. Except the difference is pressure cookers are generally thicker material and hold the heat better than your standard 5qt SS pot (with flimsy lid), which is also why dutch ovens work so well...

So i think the point of it is only to cut down on storage space for a sailboat. Your Pressure Cooker is just serving multiple purposes; PC, Dutch Oven, and large Pot (and probably a few other things).
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Old 18-01-2011, 16:03   #12
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Originally Posted by callmecrazy View Post
You're right that by removing the seal and 'baking' (vs. pressure cooking/steaming) you are effectively using a normal pot. Except the difference is pressure cookers are generally thicker material and hold the heat better than your standard 5qt SS pot (with flimsy lid), which is also why dutch ovens work so well...

So i think the point of it is only to cut down on storage space for a sailboat. Your Pressure Cooker is just serving multiple purposes; PC, Dutch Oven, and large Pot (and probably a few other things).
OK great! that makes sense and it is what I suspected.

Let's keep the info and recipes coming since it seems like we are in a race with "Intoxicated" thread. let the bread lovers win
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Old 18-01-2011, 16:26   #13
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Let's keep the info and recipes coming since it seems like we are in a race with "Intoxicated" thread. let the bread lovers win
Can't we all just get along?

Beer Bread I Recipe - Allrecipes.com
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Old 18-01-2011, 16:34   #14
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clearly i'm on the wrong thread!
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Old 19-01-2011, 14:39   #15
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Make a 3-cup yeast loaf (white or whole wheat) and let it rise once. Punch down. . Take rubber gasket out of a 4-quart, cast aluminum pressure cooker. Grease cooker and sprinkle with cornmeal. Shake to distribute cornmeal (it will imbed in the crust) and discard excess. Put bread in cooker for final rising. Lock on lid and cook over low-medium burner. Do not raise pressure. You'll learn to tell from the smell of escaping steam when it's brown on bottom and sides. Open and it's done if it's pulling away slightly from sides. Turn out, top side down. Top will not brown. This is real yeast bread to toast, make sandwiches and otherwise fill the need for real bread. Note: cast aluminum spreads heat more evenly than stainless and locked-on lid locks heat in.
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