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Old 19-01-2011, 15:00   #16
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Originally Posted by JanetGroene View Post
Make a 3-cup yeast loaf (white or whole wheat) and let it rise once. Punch down. . Take rubber gasket out of a 4-quart, cast aluminum pressure cooker. Grease cooker and sprinkle with cornmeal. Shake to distribute cornmeal (it will imbed in the crust) and discard excess. Put bread in cooker for final rising. Lock on lid and cook over low-medium burner. Do not raise pressure. You'll learn to tell from the smell of escaping steam when it's brown on bottom and sides. Open and it's done if it's pulling away slightly from sides. Turn out, top side down. Top will not brown. This is real yeast bread to toast, make sandwiches and otherwise fill the need for real bread. Note: cast aluminum spreads heat more evenly than stainless and locked-on lid locks heat in.
That sounds yummy! i like the cornmeal trick i assume it's to prevent sticking? I know, i am a newbie and it's all good info to me.
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Old 19-01-2011, 15:43   #17
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Smile Pressure Cooker Bread

Hi, everyone, Ann here, not Jim...


The OP's right, using water would steam the "bread" and goodness knows what it'd be like!

I've been baking bread in my pressure cooker for about 15 yrs. One does use it like a dutch oven by removing the gasket, not using the weight, and slow cooking it till it's done. Whether I make a 6 c. loaf or a 9 cup loaf, the cooking time is more or less 45 min., on the lowest possible flame. What I have done in the past is remove the loaf when done, turn it over, and put it back in the p.c. for about 5 min. to brown the top.

When you're done, you have a pot-shaped loaf. If this distresses you in any way, or if you're a bit pressed for an hors d'oeuvre, you can use your bread knife to square the circle, so your sandwiches are a more "normal" shape, and turn the trimmings into width-you-prefer garlic bread strips. People seem to like it a lot.

Ann, s/v Insatiable, lying Morning Cove, NSW
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Old 19-01-2011, 15:52   #18
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Sounds pretty damn good to me Ann... especially the 'Garlic Bread' bits... mmmmm
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Old 19-01-2011, 15:55   #19
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Another stove top aluminum baker here. You can also use Janet's recipe in an aluminum dutch oven if you have a close fitting lid. Steel or cast iron will not work very well if at all. Follow Janet's recipt. I use 4 cups flour, sometimes a 1/2 cup of that in whole wheat, but the whole wheat flour is harder to rise and bake in these conditions. I also double the yeast [two packets or four tspns]. I have given the recipe to dozens of people who love the bread. I usually smell the top for done, but then poke the top to see if it rebounds, as it does when done. I started doing this when living in my schooner, just kept on when living ashore.
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Old 20-01-2011, 10:48   #20
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I've been experimenting with the stove top bread a bunch lately. I use a Dutch oven and elevate the bread pan inside the Dutch oven on a tuna can so that the Dutch oven acts like a regular oven. That way, I can get a "normal" crust on yeast breads, as in the photo above. (A friend also suggested using the saucer from a clay flower pot instead of the tuna can, saying it works a lot like a baking stone.)

It's best to do small loaves (like a personal size loaf) so that enough air can circulate around the loaf. The sides and bottom will brown, but not the top crust -- therefore, I like to use darker doughs so that the bread doesn't have as much of that fish-belly-white look.

I've also had fantastic results using this method with quick breads (those that rise with baking powder instead of yeast). I've also used it to bake things like artichoke dip.

I have a bunch of photos, detailed directions and recipes on my blog:

Baking Yeast Breads in a Dutch Oven
Baking Quick Breads in a Dutch Oven
Zucchini or Carrot Bread Recipe to bake in a Dutch oven
Swedish Rye Bread to bake in a Dutch Oven

As some others mentioned, it's good to use something in the pan to prevent sticking. Corn meal is really hard to find outside the US, but oatmeal works just as well -- and I've found it almost everywhere we've ever gone.
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Old 20-01-2011, 11:17   #21
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most stainless cookware has aluminum imbedded / sandwiched in between a layer of stainless on the bottom... for the dispersion of heat evenly...
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Old 20-01-2011, 11:27   #22
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i mke biscuits and dumplings-- biscuits cook nice in my heavy duty slippery 4 qt saucepan without burning on a very low flame. top on the pan, btw...and take 10-15 min, depending on size of dropped biscuit. i dont roll em--i make the drop ones--on the box of bisquik..uhoh-- i gave it away..LOL.--in oven they take 10 min...

hay , boat galley-- what kinda dutch oven?? is it cast?/ is it coated ?? i have a cast one--and i will have my oven in functioning condition SOON!!!!!!!! hooooyaaahhhh!!!! (i have a force 10, 3 BURNER--- been cooking on camp stove since i got this boat 2 1/2 yrs ago..... will you hear a cheer from me all the way to wherever..LOL....-
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Old 20-01-2011, 12:46   #23
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When we moved from land to boat, I gave away my really heavy cast iron Dutch oven that I used to use camping -- it had been fantastic! Now I'm using an old, cheap, thin aluminum Dutch oven and it still works well. By using another pan inside of it, the exact composition of the Dutch oven isn't critical.
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Old 20-01-2011, 13:40   #24
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i had a 'ceramic' coated dutch oven that worked well...

and my cast iron skillet will be one of the very few/limited things i keep from my kitchen... about 2 decades of flavor in that iron... seasoned to perfection... non stick naturally...
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Old 21-01-2011, 00:00   #25
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my two bits. I have been baking bread in a pressure cooker for many years,at sea as well as on land and it is fantastic. I do not remove the gasket. I do leave the pressure valve off however. stainless steel works as well as any other metal. also have used the teflon coated camper style PC. It will turn out just like the artisan type breads except for the golden color of hearth baked breads.
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Old 21-01-2011, 15:24   #26
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Being newly converted to using a PC, I decided to try bread-making yesterday. Wanted to keep it simple, so tried the Beer Bread (see previous post). Greased the inside of the pot, poured the batter in, used the seal, but no gadget on top, about 1 hour later, could smell the delicious odor of fresh bread, that I haven't smelled since I was a tyke coming home after school.

Popped out the approx 8" round loaf, let cool & carved off a few slices..in fact, my neighbor in the next slip & I nearly finished off a half-loaf (with fresh butter, yumm) on the spot. SUCESS!

Now I am enthused to try other recipes, but you sure can't beat the Beer Bread for quick & easy.
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Old 21-01-2011, 16:46   #27
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i can almost smell it from here
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Old 21-01-2011, 17:03   #28
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I have not tried it in a pressure cooker, but here is what I do using a cast iron Dutch oven in my oven. I have never had better home baked bread and never made an easier yeast berad.

article: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/08mini.html
video: http://video.nytimes.com/video/2006/11/07/dining/1194817104184/no-knead-bread.html
recipe: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html?_r=1&ref=dining

A few notes:

- If you are going to try, watch the video. Very helpful.
- This dough is very wet.
- The flopping from the towel to the pan in step 4 can be a challenge. If you are not up to it, in step 3 use parchment paper instead of a towel for the final raise. When it is done, just pick up the parchment paper and put the whole thing in in the Dutch oven. Not sure this would be a good idea on the stovetop, but works great in the oven.

If anyone tries this in a pressure cooker I would love to hear the results. I suspect you will not get the great crust you get in the preheated Dutch oven, but the flavor will still be good.
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Old 04-01-2013, 09:18   #29
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Re: Bread on Stovetop. Pressure Cooker or Not?

will try thanks for the tip
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Old 04-01-2013, 10:16   #30
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Re: Bread on Stovetop. Pressure Cooker or Not?

Parhattas, I always thought it was Paratha, ie the Indian sometime stuffed bread, my local take-away does a mean set.

Dave
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