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Old 27-10-2006, 15:37   #1
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Bread Makers Onboard

I'm sure you folks are tired of my "Whatcha got in your galley" questions by now. Well, I'm not done yet.

I was asked if I had considered having a bread maker onboard. I had dismissed them as being too power intensive for a boat without a gen set. I did a quick search, and found that Zojirushi makes one that only draws 450 watts. Hum, maybe it's possible?

What is the experience on bread makers? Good? Bad? Brands to get? Brands to avoid? Do they work with an inverter?

Terry
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Old 27-10-2006, 18:08   #2
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Terry, mine isn't onboard but since I'm allergic to wheat I pretty much had to learn to use a breadmaker. Got a $39.95 Sunbeam at WalMart because I can't see a $200 appliance that only does one trick. Well, the Zoji's are better machines but with a little practice the Sunbeam can be made to work well enough.<G>

There are electronics in them, computer boards not just heating elements, so I'd urge you to check with the maker about whether they need sine wave power. I haven't taken to experimenting yet, but I've heard from many people that they can use a pressure cooker or oven very nicely, and a plain coffee can to bake the loaf in. (As it cools & contracts, it will come out and not stick to the ridges.)

Any breadmaker takes up a lot of space, you'd have to really love baking to give up that much space in a galley. And the power to run it. It is nice not to have to mess with bowls and cleanup and all...but it still is a one-trick pony that wants a big place to sleep.
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Old 27-10-2006, 19:05   #3
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I have a bread maker onboard. But instead of using the makers full bread making cycle I programme it to do all the mixing and first rise only. Then I take out the doe with the mixing bowl and put the whole lot in the gas oven for the final bake.

This way all the "ball aching" work of kneeding the doe is done by the machine and the bit requiring the high energy input is done outside the bread maker.

The bread maker is used on the inverter for this.

Not sure I've spelt "doe" correctly!!


Leighton
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Old 28-10-2006, 00:16   #4
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Terry, it may say 450W, but for how long is it going to draw that. I imagine the total consumption over time will be similar. I guess the biggest plus would be not having to have a really big Inverter.
Personly, making bread is a very simple task. OK, so for someone with joint issues it may not be, although I have heard talk of that joint work helping some. Anyways, making and kneading bread is rather simple and I don't see the point of using a bread maker. Baking in a Gas oven makes the most deliciously moist bread and the smell is just heavenly. I guess the two advantages of a bread maker is the automatic feature and the container the bread is baked in, but the storage of it could be an issue. Oh, there is one major draw back with home made bread. It's that damn good, you can't stop eating it.
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Old 28-10-2006, 00:19   #5
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Hi Leighton, it's dough........like in the bank!
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Old 28-10-2006, 00:20   #6
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I love fresh baked boat bread. Paula has just bought two bread loaf tins off trademe for the boat, mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.
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Old 28-10-2006, 00:34   #7
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this bread maker runs on Cider!

I make my own bread on board, in fact my partner requested a big loaf of bread rather then a cake for his Birthday. I must admit the smell coming out of the galley while you are sailing is heavenly!

There are other things I would rather have then a breadmaker.....like a microwave. Bread I can make, heat something in 30 seconds I cannot.

Glenda
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Old 28-10-2006, 01:10   #8
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We make all of our own bread onboard. Throw that hunk of crap in the garbage!! You should be kneeding by hand and cooking in your oven.
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Old 28-10-2006, 03:56   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alan Wheeler
Personly, making bread is a very simple task. . Anyways, making and kneading bread is rather simple and I don't see the point of using a bread maker.
Unfortunately its not that simple for a gluten free loaf. First off, it tends to be a lot runnier during the mixing than normal bread, and has the consistency of double cream rather than something you can knead. It is very difficult to get enough air into it without the use of a breadmaker. Furthermore a lot of people on a gluten free diet, also need to minimise yaest, so again the bread has to be made with an alternative raising agent.

I have this problem, and searched for a long time for a source of decent flour for a bread that keeps and isnt a solid missile. I now import the flour twice a year from Australia http://www.bodhi.com.au/products.html - (Maize and Soya Bread Mix)
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Old 28-10-2006, 09:23   #10
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The humid and warm climate of a boat are ideal for breadmaking on board. I left my bread machine at home, and now I am thinking of jettisoning it entirely - I just don't need it any more even when I'm at home.

If gluten free bread is more liquid, have you considered mixing and kneading it in a 1 or 2 gallon ziplock bag? I sometimes make regular bread this way, and leave it in the bag for the first rise. Then put it in pan(s) for the second rise. If I use a sponge, I start the sponge in the ziplock as well.

Just thought it might work for the more liquid consistency, and you might not need the machine.

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Old 28-10-2006, 09:51   #11
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as stated in my previous post, when mixed it is the consistency of double cream. Trying to get it all out of the bag would leave half the loaf in the bag smeared all over the side! Its not like kneading normal bread where it gets to the point of being almost dry on the outside.
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Old 28-10-2006, 14:02   #12
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Talbot-
There are some excellent mixes for GF bread in the US from Bob's Red Mill and some other companies, all the "flours" and GF yeast in the bag. The dough isn't that runny. And, at least here in the US, the common baking yeasts from the store are GF. Fleischman's (sp?) and Red Star are the two big brand names around me, both use GF yeast bases. Both are available in small bricks (refrigerated) or dried in packets, they're big name conventional baking supplies.

But I've found some simple recipes based on a combination of rice, potato, and tapioca flours that make a very nice "white" loaf and all three of those are readily available here. (I'm not sure but I think mixes that are too much rice flour are the really runny ones.)

Entlie, the ingredients for a simple GF loaf can run a fast $6+ with commercial mixes (mainly 4.50-5.00 for the "flour" mix) so making a mess all over ziploc bags and throwing out gobs of the stuff just isn't an attractive option. And most of the GF breads that you can buy in stores are equally expensive, but smaller and often taste awful. There's usually only one rise for GF bread. Since there's no gluten in it, once it collapses it is down for the count. (And very easy for it to collapse while cooling.)
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Old 28-10-2006, 15:08   #13
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Unfortunately I have a candida problem as well so have to avoid yeasts like the plague. (no mushrooms either sob!)

Another problem with most GF bread is how short a shelf life they have, The one I use is fine for a week if kept in the fridge, but a day or two at the best in the ambient temperature. - but at least that also means its not chock full of preservatves like most modern breads.

Just to add to the fun, I also have a fierce intolerance to dairy produce, so going out for a meal can be really interesting!
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Old 28-10-2006, 15:22   #14
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Talbot, the short shelf life is actually normal for baked goods. What's abnormal is the preseved stuff we often have been raised on.

Adding a dash more salt or vinegar in the mix can help it keep longer, at the risk of it not rising as high, and getting a crisp crust on it helps too. Personally I find that without xantham gum, the loaves crumble too much by the time 3-4 days have gone. (Another thing that shouldn't be overdone though.<G>)

A lot depends on handling and storage, if avoid handling the loaf (i.e. cover it with a paper towel when cooling, and handle it with a paper towel when holding it to slice) you will avoid touching it, and you'll be surprised how much that helps prevent mold/fungus from starting. No matter how clean you think your hands are.<G>

The coffee can in the pressure cooker bit...One of these days I'll have to see how adventurous I am, I can't help thinking that's only going to ruin both somehow.
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Old 28-10-2006, 15:36   #15
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Thats the other good thing about the bread I have, it normally doesnt crumble (unless we dont put enough water in the mix!)
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