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Old 29-05-2006, 11:18   #1
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Best foods to dehaydrate?

We are planning to spend a few months cruising the northern B.C. coast. We want to take as much of our own staples as possible. We want to dehydrate vegetables. Does anyone have a good way of dehaydrating potatoes? I love my potatoes.
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Old 30-05-2006, 11:18   #2
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There are a couple of cook books for dehydrating fruits,vegetables and meat, etc. One that I have came with my American Harvest drier. Unfortunately I can't get the book easily as I'm a bit of "disabled" person while my new hip (hip replacement) takes hold and my muscles heal. Check out some better cooking book stores, and maybe even some places like REI. I don't think its a big deal to dry potatoes. There are lots of places to purchase groceries at a reasonable price along the BC coast, until you start going north of Desolation Sound.
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Old 30-05-2006, 15:46   #3
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I'd expect you can dehydrate potatoes about the same way as anything else, but if you look online for industrial food suppliers...all sorts of things are there. Including perfectly good canned diced/sliced potatoes which will keep forever and are common at restaurant suppliers.

Storebought instant mased can also be very good--the trick is that you don't just beat the heck out of them, you FOLD instead of stirring and whipping, so you don't break them down. And you don't add boiling water--you add boiling + cold to bring the temp down, the way they suggest on the box.

Fresh potatoes kept cool and dry will last a reasonably LONG time (store in paper not plastic) but check also with the Canadian authorities. We had some problems with either potatoes or blueberries (yeah, I should remember which) because they were allowed one way and not the other, depending on whether they were boxed or bagged (loose) because apparently one way they are supplied "as is" and the other way they are sufficiently sterilized to prevent blight. If that sounds confusing...yes, it was, and remains confusing to me to. But the entry point was deserted and the nice man said "Just keep 'em on the boat and we'll ignore it".

By the way, check your credit cards. Some of them (Amex) will do foreign currency very close to par and post the transaction the same day, so you get an excellent conversation rate--better than what you'll often get at banks, and much better than stores will give you for USD$. Others post and clear only monthly, at very different rates.
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Old 31-05-2006, 07:29   #4
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Thanks for the advice.
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Old 31-05-2006, 13:40   #5
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If you are looking to extend food life as much as possible, Those items that cant be dehydrated or frozen (if you have that capability) can certainly be vacuum packed. That should at least double their life.
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Old 11-07-2006, 19:25   #6
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www.beprepared.com has dehydrated sweet peas (or freeze dried, I forget)which are much better than home dehydrated. Also the corn is better than home dehydrated. For pasta, buy ramen noodles and throw the seasoning packet away. In 10 minutes with just hot water, they are cooked.
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Old 11-07-2006, 20:11   #7
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What? No pizza?
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Old 11-07-2006, 22:14   #8
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Kai?? You have 'a Susan' ... what are you complaining about??
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Old 12-07-2006, 00:07   #9
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THere are some things, even Susan can not add flavor to. Dehydrated potatos is one of those things.
Actually, a little garlic mixed in with the potatos works wonders.
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Old 12-07-2006, 12:43   #10
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On the pizza tangent... I'd rather have pizza than a boat.

We definitely make pizza on our boat. All you need is flour (keeps for a long time), yeast (same), oil (same), cans of tomato sauce (same), and mozzerella. You can freeze the mozz if you have a freezer. We have pizzas for months when we provision up.
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Old 12-07-2006, 16:19   #11
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I've seen dehydrated or freeze dried "pizza" marketed as astronaut pizza. it had the vague taste of crackers with old tomato sauce and cheese... I wouldn't call it a pizza, but personally, I liked it. though I know many who don't. the astronaut pizza was expensive though, like 4-5 dollars for about one slice worth. worth a taste if you're interested, but It wouldn't make a good everyday food. be cheaper to pull in and take a taxi to the pizza hut
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Old 13-07-2006, 02:30   #12
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Pizza is normally baked at a pretty high temperature (? 450F - 235 C ?), requiring a decent oven.
Has anyone had any luck with a stove-top pizza, or pizza-like simulacrum?
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Old 13-07-2006, 07:51   #13
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Gord, a real pizzaria owner would laugh at 450F, their ovens (gas or coal, I won't argue either way) are way hotter under the pie.

But since you can make "pan bread" in a black iron skillet, I don't see why you couldn't make a decent pizza with some practice. Melting the cheese and sauce is easy, the question is, how picky are you about the crust, how crispy/thin/thick does it have to be? There's a lot of variety in the answers.

Just don't ever ask for Pizza up by Yale, i.e. in New Haven. There's some wierd Connecticut thing going on up there, they think the tomato sauce is optional. Honest.
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Old 14-07-2006, 03:16   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
1. Gord, a real pizzaria owner would laugh at 450F, their ovens (gas or coal, I won't argue either way) are way hotter under the pie.
...
2. Just don't ever ask for Pizza up by Yale, i.e. in New Haven. There's some wierd Connecticut thing going on up there, they think the tomato sauce is optional. Honest.
1. Excactly my point.
2. I might be a clandestine "Connecticuter" - the tomato sauce is my only objection to pizza (as food).
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Old 14-07-2006, 06:50   #15
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Gord, there's certainly nothing "wrong" to me about "white pizza" or even "green pizza" (i.e. spinach or broccoli, no tomato sauce, and cheese). But...that's "fancy pizza" not "pizza".

When I grew up "pizza" was always, always, always, made of bread plus cheese plus red sauce. Was never "thick crust" or "thin curst" but always, well, regular crust. Never had green stuff on top, unless it was the dried spices.<G> And most important of all, it was ALWAYS made on an 18" wide aluminum plate. Yes, a "regular" pizza is always 18" wide. Anything smaller is a "small" or "individual" pizza, and any chain that tries to tell you a 10" or 14" or 16" pizza is a "large" pie? Can clean my bilge. No matter what they make or how good it tastes, they ain't in the pizza business, at least not by US domestic definitions.<G>

And of course...Pizza is eaten with the hand here. Only the tourists ask for a knife and fork, and we have fun watching them try to use those.<G>
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