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Old 25-10-2010, 07:02   #1
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Barbecue

I'm thinking of getting a Magma bbq for my 28 footer. She has a metho stove, so there's no gas on board atm. I'm thinking a charcoal/heat beads bbq is the way to go. Gas is nice and quick, but then I would have to lug a bottle and stow it somewhere, and make sure I don't blow myself up.

Bbq oracles, your wisdom is needed.

cheers' lockie
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Old 25-10-2010, 07:46   #2
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Hauling charcoal is not without its own problems in terms of bulk and mess. I have propane for the stove in the galley and bbq on the rails: works excellent
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Old 25-10-2010, 07:56   #3
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Used a Magma charcoal bbq for years. Having a bag of charcoal aboard was no problem. Worked better than the Force Five gas bbq's that would not get hot if it was blowing over ten knots. The Magma now sits in the basement as we stopped grilling on the boat, replaced it with a good cast iron frying pan. Does steaks just as well and no running out to the stern rail to check if it's cooking.
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Old 25-10-2010, 11:54   #4
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The only drawback We had with our charcoal grill which was given to us is.
Charcoal is a great moisture absorber, unless you grill a lot or buy small bags, it will get damp. Just remember to have a big plastic trash bag to put the big bags of charcoal in to keep it dry..

We still switched over to propane anyway, even though I prefer cooking on wood or charcoal. Easier to clean up and stow away..
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Old 31-10-2010, 04:30   #5
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Hi, We used to do the same on our first boat,a clansman.

We used the magma kettle until we heard of the "Cobb Oven" which is the same but insulated, so you only need about 6 heat beads, instead of >15.

This has endured many roasts, bread, scones, cakes and millions of pizza, crossed many miles and 2 more boats.

However, a friend has a "Webber Baby Q" gas bbq and they do the same - making roasts, bread, pizza, fry etc--, but quicker. We have been 'sold' and now have a weber gas bbq which does it all. Getting a new bottls can be a drama as most servo's have some version of the swap n go - but the fittings are the same and there is somewhere that can refill on the way.

We have a smev oven and have not tapped the gas from their source to the weber bbq - but it is easy for a gasfitter.
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Old 31-10-2010, 07:45   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
... the Force Five gas bbq's that would not get hot if it was blowing over ten knots ...
Indeed!

During the 70-80's, we used a Hibachi charcoal grill on Lake Superior. Never had a problem with moisture, during our short season.
Used it both ashore and in cockpit.
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Old 31-10-2010, 09:27   #7
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struck a chord, Gord

Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Indeed!

During the 70-80's, we used a Hibachi charcoal grill on Lake Superior. Never had a problem with moisture, during our short season.
Used it both ashore and in cockpit.
Boy, that brings back memories...of sailing our 24' Folkboat to the Channel Islands, the hibachi being our only stove and having to use vise grips to keep the damn thing from tipping over in the cockpit, while Linda tried to cook burgers in a rolly anchorage. The Folkboat was wood, no floors in the cockpit, just grating, so everything went to the bilges..luckily, she carried at least 6 " of water in the bilges at all times, so we had a fighting chance.

No electricity on board, either..arggh, them was the days!
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Old 09-11-2010, 09:26   #8
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Have you thought about a Cobb?
I've been using one on my wood boat with great success. Like you I have no gas on board but was mainly drawn to the Cobb because I can put it on a wood deck. Last year I chopped up an old stanchion mounted fender basket which the Cobb slips into.
There's no worry about charcoal going damp because the coconut fuel briquets are sealed in polythene. One is enough for around 3 hours cooking.
The most ambitious meal afloat to date was roast haunch of venison with roast spuds & veg. Yum!
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:29   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GordMay View Post
Indeed!

During the 70-80's, we used a Hibachi charcoal grill on Lake Superior. Never had a problem with moisture, during our short season.
Used it both ashore and in cockpit.

I definitely had one way back in the day, but for the life of me I can not remember it ever being as clean as the one in your picture.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:52   #10
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There's a new, clean, compact charcoal called Flame Disk. Also said to produce less CO.
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Old 09-11-2010, 11:55   #11
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I deceided to stick with propane when mine gave out but I sure thought long and hard about the Cobb:
Welcome to the award winning COBB BBQ COOKING SYSTEM!
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Old 09-11-2010, 12:17   #12
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I highly recommend the Cobb. Mine has produces some excellent meals. Butterflying a whole chicken with beer in the mote is wonderful.
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Old 09-11-2010, 12:38   #13
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Big Green Egg

these are awesome.
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Old 09-11-2010, 13:06   #14
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You guys that aren't getting rail mounted grills, where do you put the grill so you can cook while sailing? Or are these types just for while anchored?

I like the idea of getting either a portable Weber or even the COBB.
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Old 09-11-2010, 13:28   #15
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Take a good hard look at Solaire Infrared Grills. I can't say enough good things about em. I'll definitely never own another type of grill on a boat.

Solaire Anywhere! Infrared Grill 304 Stainless Steel - SOL-IR17B
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