Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 08-09-2014, 10:35   #31
Moderator
 
Seaworthy Lass's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2008
Boat: Aluminium cutter rigged sloop
Posts: 12,807
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkJ View Post
6 'flat' teaspoons of sugar = 30 grams sucrose. Amounts humans have never had in nature until slavery.

Even The American Heart Association says 6 flat teaspoons are the whole days sugar limit. To have it in one drink is like guzzling a Coke. Of course it will make someone 'feel' better because they have a sugar hit but it wont do anything for the electrolytes.

Sugar 101

Glucose is better converted by vegetables or protein.
Mark, this is a recipe specifically for rehydration (eg with diarrhoea or with excessive loss of sweat), not for normal drinks. It is often used when food simply can't be kept down. And it is not just 'one drink'. It is a litre. It may be all that is consumed in a day if someone is ill.
__________________

__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea." Isak Dinesen
"To me the simple act of tying a knot is an adventure in unlimited space." Clifford Ashley
Seaworthy Lass is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2014, 11:43   #32
Marine Service Provider
 
NornaBiron's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Greece
Boat: Custom steel cutter, 15m
Posts: 644
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaworthy Lass View Post
Mark, this is a recipe specifically for rehydration (eg with diarrhoea or with excessive loss of sweat), not for normal drinks. It is often used when food simply can't be kept down. And it is not just 'one drink'. It is a litre. It may be all that is consumed in a day if someone is ill.
This is a very valuable recipe that everyone should keep to hand. When you check your first aid kit/medicine locker and find that you've run out of Dioralite or Rehydrat this recipe will take its place. If someone is seasick and cannot eat at least you'll know that they are getting some salts to replace what is being lost and not just plain water.

By the way, it's a WHO endorsed recipe for treatment of severe dehydration in children and infants but can be applied to adults too.
__________________

__________________
Sail repairs by cruisers for cruisers
NornaBiron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2014, 15:10   #33
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: ARC Provisioning

Normally sugars are taken in food. But when a person cannot take in food (e.g. serious stomach issues) then higher sugar intake in drinks is recommended. Sugars are necessary for proper brain functions and too low sugar intake OVER EXTENDED PERIODS would do us damage.

When sugars are put into isotonic sports drinks however, is NOT for the brain but for the muscles. I believe the important one is glucose then hence honey in my original recipe.

Interestingly, a healthy and fit person can go without sugar "for ages".

If you notice at any point that removing sugar from your diet does make you sick, consult your doc immediately as this may be an early sign of obesity induced diabetes.

Cheers,
b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2014, 15:26   #34
֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎֍֎

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 13,022
Re: ARC Provisioning

"cup a soups are very handy."
And they'll far excel your daily salt requirement, so you can skip the 3kg of salt and make the boat that much lighter & faster!
__________________
hellosailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2014, 16:07   #35
Registered User
 
Katiusha's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 800
Re: ARC Provisioning

Is the higher gluten flour sold in the Canaries good for making bread or should I stock up beforehand? Also wrt whole wheat flours...

Up to now I've had varying success with bread flours and yeasts from different countries in the Med - gluten development and rising differs, so it's always trial and error. And not always a satisfactory result overall.

So, will I be able to easily find decent bread flour in the Canaries? Is it usually fresh? Good quality? What about instant yeast?

Thanks in advance.
__________________
Katiusha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 02:44   #36
Marine Service Provider
 
NornaBiron's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Greece
Boat: Custom steel cutter, 15m
Posts: 644
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiusha View Post
Is the higher gluten flour sold in the Canaries good for making bread or should I stock up beforehand? Also wrt whole wheat flours...

Up to now I've had varying success with bread flours and yeasts from different countries in the Med - gluten development and rising differs, so it's always trial and error. And not always a satisfactory result overall.

So, will I be able to easily find decent bread flour in the Canaries? Is it usually fresh? Good quality? What about instant yeast?

Thanks in advance.
When I have an address (some friendly bar where we're hanging around for a week or so) I order 25kg sacks of bread flour from amazon.co.uk. It's good quality and is available in white, wholemeal, multi seed etc. Delivery is reasonably priced and generally pretty swift.
__________________
Sail repairs by cruisers for cruisers
NornaBiron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 06:38   #37
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiusha View Post
Is the higher gluten flour sold in the Canaries good for making bread or should I stock up beforehand? Also wrt whole wheat flours...

Up to now I've had varying success with bread flours and yeasts from different countries in the Med - gluten development and rising differs, so it's always trial and error. And not always a satisfactory result overall.

So, will I be able to easily find decent bread flour in the Canaries? Is it usually fresh? Good quality? What about instant yeast?

Thanks in advance.
I am not sure gluten or no gluten now you are talking some exercises us humans better not try at home.

Alas, if you want flour. It is here. Mercadona has just started selling 5kg packs. Good economy. This is plain white wheat flour. It sells at .35 cents per kilo. This is your base price and quality level.

No magic no trouble buying nor making. Mixing 15 minutes, baking 30 minutes and your bread is ready. It comes out fine every single day. If it does not, perhaps you are into fancy ingredients that ask for special techniques?

Yeast. Yes. Available. Dried yeast half kilo packs, best value FROM KOREAN small shops facing el mercado municipal. .5 kg at 3.50 EUR.

Other flours: YES. Integral (whole grain) and pastry (wheat, finely ground) available easily and more expensive. Rye and other types too and premixes, etc. All of these available, at a price. The more fancy types via healthy food stands. Imagine the ticket.

Local specialty: GOFIO - burned/fried flour, mostly mix of maiz (corn) and wheat, sometimes pure or mix with other types BUT always burned (toasted). Acquired taste. Goes fine into pancakes (sweet grade) dough, dumplings, etc. Worth taking one bag aboard to make baking experiments underway.

Hope this helps all bread lovers sailing via our lovely islands.


Cheers,
b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 10:45   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 596
Re: ARC Provisioning

Potassium is an important mineral that is lost from sweat. If you have muscle cramps from physical effort, get some Potassium. Potassium is in fruits, meats and nuts. Salt substitute contains quite a bit of Potassium and I have a recipe for a "sports" drink that uses a bit of salt, water, Karo syrup and salt substitute/Potassium. I don't use the Karo syrup since sugar can upset my stomach especially with physical labor. I really have to be burning some calories to tolerate the amount of sugar in sports drinks.

A container of salt substitute will last a very long time. Just be careful with Potassium. Too much will kill you. Too little will kill you. It needs to be used just right.

My current Potassium source is peanuts that I eat constantly and veggie juice. I don't really like the veggie juice, V8 or similar drinks, but it is high n Potassium and it is filling and refreshing after a workout in the gym or physical labor.

Later,
Dan
__________________
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 11:19   #39
Marine Service Provider
 
NornaBiron's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Greece
Boat: Custom steel cutter, 15m
Posts: 644
Re: ARC Provisioning

Bananas are good for potassium
__________________
Sail repairs by cruisers for cruisers
NornaBiron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 13:42   #40
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by NornaBiron View Post
Bananas are good for potassium
Also available in Las Palmas ;-)

Whole dried bananas can be kept on board for ages. Good snack, great energy, great potassium.

Our local bananas are better than anything you buy on the old continent as we grow them locally.

BTW do not worry much about "too much" of anything in your diet. The body is smart and will expel almost all excess of vitamins, minerals and other paraphernalia. The only thing you have to care about is limiting your calories over the long run which is one of two vital elements of remaining fit.

BTW2 Ocean calories intake should be well below your shore intake too. There is hardly any exercise on modern cruising boats and so the amount of energy required to run the mill is limited too. BUT do watch the quality of your food on the passage: champagne and caviar are ranked highest in this respect.

Cheers,
b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 13:56   #41
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 596
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by NornaBiron View Post
Bananas are good for potassium
Yep, Bananas are a good source for potassium. Once upon a time I was out in the heat and humidity working on new asphalt. I was eating and drinking plenty of fluids but I started to feel light headed. Thankfully, I found a banana to eat and it was like someone flicked a switch. I went from about to pass out to being much better. Potassium was the key.

I used to eat lots of dried bananas but now eat other dried fruits. We have a dehydrator which we use to make jerky and dried fruits. The dried bananas I make are SOOOOO much better than store bought but I can't prevent them from turning brown even though I have added citric acid.

Later,
Dan
__________________
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 14:55   #42
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: ARC Provisioning

Dan twas not potassium that saved you. Twas sugar, honey.

;-)
b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 16:42   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 596
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
Dan twas not potassium that saved you. Twas sugar, honey.

;-)
b.
Not sugar, potassium. I was eating plenty of food and drinking quarts of water but the food I was eating was not replacing potassium. If you don't have enough potassium you die, conversely, too much potassium will kill you, which is why potassium supplements have so little potassium. In the heat and humidity where I live, you can sweat out salt and potassium very quickly. Replacing salt has not been a problem for me but potassium certainly needs to be replaced. When working I eat to keep calories flowing, even though when one is hot, one does not want to eat, I force myself to eat to fuel the body. I am not talking about working out in the gym for an hour but doing manual labor for 6 to 12 hours in the heat and humidity.

If I don't replace the potassium I will not feel well and will almost certainly get BAD muscle cramps. Sugar has nothing to do with it. Now a days I eat lots of peanuts when say splitting firewood because peanuts are loaded with fat, protein and potassium.

The good thing about nuts, is that a small handful is loaded with calories and sits well on my stomach. If one is on the go and just needs something to keep you going dried fruits and peanuts provides a good source of calories. Unsalted peanuts though, I really don't like the salted variety especially when one is doing hard work where you are sweating heavily.

Later,
Dan
__________________
dannc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2014, 17:23   #44
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: ARC Provisioning

Dan I love you and so you are allowed to have your potassium. As long as it comes from most tasty, most healthy and dirt inexpensive CANARY BANANAS.

Because it is a food for ARC thread. ;-)

About the only way to get a potassium shot would be to have it shot intravenously. From food, absorption is pretty slow. You eat the banana today, you see the effects long after you have forgotten there was ever any banana in your life.

And BTW dried fruit and nuts are available in Las Palmas in any size and form one likes them. Local specialty are fresh dates. Well worth trying out. Sugary and loaded with errr... potassium? and plenty of other micro/macro stuff.

Cheers,
b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2014, 03:16   #45
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 13,649
Images: 3
Re: ARC Provisioning

Quote:
BTW do not worry much about "too much" of anything in your diet. The body is smart and will expel almost all excess of vitamins, minerals and other paraphernalia. The only thing you have to care about is limiting your calories over the long run which is one of two vital elements of remaining fit.

BTW2 Ocean calories intake should be well below your shore intake too. There is hardly any exercise on modern cruising boats and so the amount of energy required to run the mill is limited too. BUT do watch the quality of your food on the passage: champagne and caviar are ranked highest in this respect.
I agree, I always find on long passages , I gain weight , never loose it. Despite all that "stuff" about exercise/moving muscles on a boat, the fact is that long distance trade wind sailing involves very little activity

Good call re flour in the canaries, I have been there many many times, always found flour for bread difficult to find. I mean why bother since the bakeries are so good, ( same thing in France)

dave
__________________

__________________
Check out my new blog on smart boat technology, networking and gadgets for the connected sailor! - http://smartboats.tumblr.com
goboatingnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
arc, provisioning

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What is your best provisioning tip? Entlie Provisioning: Food & Drink 159 28-11-2013 06:48
Crew Wanted: ARC Regatta 2012 + ARC Europe 2013 skip-per Crew Archives 2 08-02-2012 00:48
Provisioning in Abaco GordMay Provisioning: Food & Drink 3 01-04-2010 19:07
Provisioning May '08 in France (Brest) . . . Any Tips and / or Hints ? georgelewisray Provisioning: Food & Drink 1 24-03-2008 11:58
Provisioning in Belize Capn Dan Provisioning: Food & Drink 1 31-05-2007 23:11



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:14.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.