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Old 18-06-2012, 14:17   #1
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Which sail for what wind?

At the risk of sounding like a total beginner I'm just curious? My Previous boat had a Furling Genoa so I didn't have to change the sail I could just let out more or take up on it. On the new boat I have a bunch of foresails. What is your comfort zone in knots for each of your number one, number two and so on? My boat is Ranger 28 my displacement is 5108. Sorry if this has been asked before I couldn't find it. Thanks

I have 155% #1 genoa 9.8 oz
150%#1 genoa 5 oz
135% #2 6 oz
100% #3 7 oz
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Old 18-06-2012, 14:34   #2
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

In fact, I don't really know the precise limits of my "comfort zone", for I don't have an anemometer.

When going to windward, the main criteria I use are heel and rudder angle: when I feel that the boat is heeling too much (deck awash) or carries too much weather helm, I reef or change for a smaller jib.

When running, the criterium is the capability to steer in a straight line... But this also depends on the sea state.

So, my advice is to experiment by yourself .

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Old 18-06-2012, 15:05   #3
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

Yeah, it's comfort and boat specific. I think the R28 is more of an IOR spinoff design...? Tall thin mainsail and big headsail rig? Many boats sail faster if you reef or change sails when overpowered. Here's i s my general guess going to weather or close reach:

I have 155% #1 genoa 9.8 oz (maybe 15-18 upper limit)RU sure about 9.8oz???
150%#1 genoa 5 oz light air, 15 max?
135% #2 6 oz 22-25 max
100% #3 7 oz 35 max
Really jst guessing , but somewhere inthe ballpark.
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Old 18-06-2012, 16:07   #4
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

I have a similar suit of sails for the Grampian 26 I sail, with the exception of a 155. I found that selecting the sail size for the gusts as opposed to the average worked for me. I got tired of being rounded up in the gusts.
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Old 18-06-2012, 16:38   #5
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

A great book that covers just that and much more is Royce's Sailing Illustrated. It's old but a good find in a bookstore or library. About 15 to 18 knots is time to reef and move to a working jib in your size boat. Larger heavier boats can go a little longer without reefing but I try to think about it early.
Comfort and heel have a lot to do with it and so does your point of sail. You can carry more sail downwind as you know but if you are going to turn round and go back upwind be prepared to change headsails and reef your main.
kind regards,
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Old 18-06-2012, 20:20   #6
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jSnyder View Post
At the risk of sounding like a total beginner I'm just curious? My Previous boat had a Furling Genoa so I didn't have to change the sail I could just let out more or take up on it. On the new boat I have a bunch of foresails. What is your comfort zone in knots for each of your number one, number two and so on? My boat is Ranger 28 my displacement is 5108. Sorry if this has been asked before I couldn't find it. Thanks

I have 155% #1 genoa 9.8 oz
150%#1 genoa 5 oz
135% #2 6 oz
100% #3 7 oz
Snyder,

You have a pretty weird selection there. Typically a 1 (the 155) would be a slightly fuller cut, and be fore light air days. When winds are supposed to stay in the 0-10kn range, but it can likely take 12-14. The heavy one (the 150 is a flatter cut, heavier material sail for days when you don't need quite as much power. Say wind speeds in the 7-10 (so just at the top of the 155), but could normally be carried up to 15.

Remember racers will only do a headsail change during downwind legs, so the sail has to be heavy enou to take some abuse if the wind picks up unexpectedly.

The 2 is a rare sail on most boats, but figure 13-17 ideally. Depending in crew weight, and how the boat like a breeze. A light weight boat will switch down faster than a bigger heavier boat.

The 3 (100) is typically used above whatever the 2 likes.


Because of your slightly weird selection, I would ask the local sailmakers and find out who sold those sails to the last owner, and what the thought was. If you can't find who sold them, then find your own sailmaker and ask for his advice. There may be something else going on here (kevlar can use lighter weight for the same wind speed as compared to Dacron)
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Old 19-06-2012, 03:31   #7
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The 135 is a good all around sail for most conditions for a fin keel boat.
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Old 19-06-2012, 09:41   #8
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

Not clear why on your ship the bigger sails are the heavier ones. On our ship it is exactly the other way round.

9 oz sail ina 28 footer is a heavy sail, maybe too heavy for a foresail.

b.
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Old 19-06-2012, 10:00   #9
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jSnyder View Post

I have 155% #1 genoa 9.8 oz
150%#1 genoa 5 oz
135% #2 6 oz
100% #3 7 oz
What you have is an old school IRC racing set of sails. i dont know whether the sails themselves are desinged for racing since you are on a hunter

But the breakdown of sizes would have been a very common one.

The names would be as follows:

Light Number 1: 155% with light cloth (LN1)
Number 1: 150% (N1)
Number 2: 135% (N2)
Number 3: 100% (N3)

edit: just realized i mixed some cloth up
I think the heavy 155% may have been intended for downwind in moderate airs as I dont hear mention of a spinnaker???

For optimal speed, but not necessarily optimal in terms of how easy to use...

LN1: is for less than <5 knots. If your normal N1 cant hold its shape and you are actually looking to heel the baot to leeward to help with sail shape - use the LN1. Most non-racers are turning the engine on at these wind conditions

N1: 5-10 or 12kts usually. If you are having to hold the tiller way off center to keep the boat straight it is a good sign that it is time to change to a smaller headsail, among other things

N2: 10-15 or 18kts

N3: 18kts plus

These wind speeds would generally apply only to going upwind. Going downwind is a different story and you can keep up as much headsail as you feel comfortable.

When not racing but crusing you can ingnore to a bit the advice above as it is about optimized speed. Sometimes however when cruising it is about optimized comfort and ease...

...without knowing your boat I can just say carry the largest headsail you feel comfortable with, if the boat has alot of weather helm one of many things you can do is to reduce headsail. Also the N3 usually will go upwind MUCH closer to the wind than the N1 especially if they are old sails.

hope that helps
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Old 19-06-2012, 11:46   #10
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

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Not clear why on your ship the bigger sails are the heavier ones. On our ship it is exactly the other way round.

9 oz sail ina 28 footer is a heavy sail, maybe too heavy for a foresail.

b.
sailing in 25 knot or greater winds, stormy conditions, or going long distances. routine conditions/situation in the trades, southern latitudes, and our favorite: indian ocean. btw: for cruising having the jibs cut short so the tack starts at least 18" off the deck saves a lot of wear and tear. if you really want to hank on the 150 and want to avoid crawling on deck for a sail change when a storm hits, try having it redone with multiple tacks and clews so you can keep shorting it as conditions worsen. not elegant but works well. a good sail maker can put in suitable reefs and cut the sail so it can be shorten without loosing much of its shape. of course better to have a cutter rig, but that is another issue.

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Old 19-06-2012, 12:27   #11
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

Ranger not Hunter. Big difference in my opinion.
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Old 19-06-2012, 12:36   #12
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

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Ranger not Hunter. Big difference in my opinion.
true. the mull rangers sail real well. hunters are ok for the sunday afternoon crowd. a bit above odays. basically coronados with less glass.
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Old 19-06-2012, 13:02   #13
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Ranger not Hunter. Big difference in my opinion.
Oops. My mistake, don't know where I saw the word "hunter"...
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Old 19-06-2012, 13:12   #14
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

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Oops. My mistake, don't know where I saw the word "hunter"...
that's ok. maybe you were thinking about the benetubbies?
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Old 19-06-2012, 18:33   #15
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Re: Which sail for what wind?

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sailing in 25 knot or greater winds, stormy conditions, or going long distances. routine conditions/situation in the trades, southern latitudes, and our favorite: indian ocean. btw: for cruising having the jibs cut short so the tack starts at least 18" off the deck saves a lot of wear and tear. if you really want to hank on the 150 and want to avoid crawling on deck for a sail change when a storm hits, try having it redone with multiple tacks and clews so you can keep shorting it as conditions worsen. not elegant but works well. a good sail maker can put in suitable reefs and cut the sail so it can be shorten without loosing much of its shape. of course better to have a cutter rig, but that is another issue.

I did this once and regretted it. Makes for a real sloppy sail even on a 120%. By the time you get it down, deal with all the excess sail below the reef point (BTW: anything bigger than a 100% blade will have excess sail sticking out aft of the new tack cringle!) then tie the excess up, and change the fairleads etc. Just as simple to just change sails and have a decent sail up!
My sailmaker tried to tell me it was a bad idea....
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