Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 19-06-2012, 18:59   #16
Registered User
 
cwyckham's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Niagara 35
Posts: 1,870
Quote:
Originally Posted by jSnyder
At the risk of sounding like a total beginner I'm just curious? My Previous boat had a Furling Genoa so I didn't have to change the sail I could just let out more or take up on it. On the new boat I have a bunch of foresails. What is your comfort zone in knots for each of your number one, number two and so on? My boat is Ranger 28 my displacement is 5108. Sorry if this has been asked before I couldn't find it. Thanks

I have 155% #1 genoa 9.8 oz
150%#1 genoa 5 oz
135% #2 6 oz
100% #3 7 oz
We spent $10 on an inclinometer and change when we hit 25 degrees.we start with a reef, then go to headsail, then second reef, etc
__________________

__________________
Chris
SailMentor.com - Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat
cwyckham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 04:33   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
I did this once and regretted it. Makes for a real sloppy sail even on a 120%. By the time you get it down, deal with all the excess sail below the reef point (BTW: anything bigger than a 100% blade will have excess sail sticking out aft of the new tack cringle!) then tie the excess up, and change the fairleads etc. Just as simple to just change sails and have a decent sail up!
My sailmaker tried to tell me it was a bad idea....
agree totally, but it is an option. the jib needs to be cut rather flat. not very efficient, but does work to get through a temporary blow without all the fuss and bother of changing sails. roller reefing the better way to go.
__________________

__________________
reed1v is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 11:57   #18
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
Re: Which sail for what wind?

I dislike big genoas. For starters you can't see under those 135% or 140% deck sweepers, which is a PITA if you sail in crowded waters.

Get a high cut 120% genoa that reefs well (don't forget luff tape). For light air, use an asymmetric spinnaker with a sock or on a furler.
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 12:05   #19
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,369
Re: Which sail for what wind?

For coastal sailing on that boat, the 135% is probably a great sail. Or in the islands too if you sail with "gusto"! or if you pay attention to the wind predictions. The light 150% would probably do fine for downwind work. and the 100% great in a moderate blow. Those 3 would work out well for you I suspect. The heavy 155... maybe leave it home.... Sure roller furling is nice, but on a 28 ft boat.... one pull and it's down! Nothing wrong with good old fashioned, foolproof hank on sails...
__________________
"I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted" - Elmore Leonard











Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 12:24   #20
Senior Cruiser
 
SkiprJohn's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kea'au, Big Island, Hawaii
Boat: Cascade, Sloop, 42 - "Casual"
Posts: 14,192
Re: Which sail for what wind?

I think you have a good suit of sails. Just have to determine your comfort level in using them. I look out on the water and determine which I'll start with and then change if need be during the day. Light winds get my big light sail. About 10k starts me out with my #2 and if it is nearly 15k I start with the #3. I'd only rig your big heavy genoa if you were broad reaching for the day in winds up to 15k. In other words I think your large heavy genoa is for downwind work to 15k.
I think others have said the same thing but maybe in different words.
Did you get a spinnaker too?

kind regards,
__________________
John
SkiprJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 12:27   #21
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheechako View Post
For coastal sailing on that boat, the 135% is probably a great sail. Or in the islands too if you sail with "gusto"! or if you pay attention to the wind predictions. The light 150% would probably do fine for downwind work. and the 100% great in a moderate blow. Those 3 would work out well for you I suspect. The heavy 155... maybe leave it home.... Sure roller furling is nice, but on a 28 ft boat.... one pull and it's down! Nothing wrong with good old fashioned, foolproof hank on sails...
unless you dont want to crawl forward on a skinny deck in pounding seas. hank on is foolproof(well almost) but today's roller reefing systems are almost as fp and are real safety factors. btw: for cruising, all head sails should be high cut and off the deck by at least 18". two feet preferably.
__________________
reed1v is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 13:29   #22
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by reed1v View Post
(...) if you really want to hank on the 150 and want to avoid crawling on deck for a sail change when a storm hits, try having it redone with multiple tacks and clews so you can keep shorting it as conditions worsen (...)
+/-

It will still be next to useless when flown all up ...

Maybe, if it is a cross cut, then, maybe, a good sailmaker can cut it down to 90-100%.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20-06-2012, 14:20   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,105
Re: Which sail for what wind?

Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
+/-

It will still be next to useless when flown all up ...

Maybe, if it is a cross cut, then, maybe, a good sailmaker can cut it down to 90-100%.

b.
good for downwind. ranger has fairly flat bottom. big fat headsail can get the boat on a plane, at least does on a r-26. squirrelly boats. need to be on the helm every second. good fun boats for racing. dont know where the guy is sailing, but the 155 might be instead of a spinnaker. would make sense for the bay area coming downhill with short crew. mull's design can leave a rooster tail with a big bad spinnaker up in 25 knot winds. the 155 would give an advantage in strong winds since it could be left up a whole lot longer than a spinnaker. if he has a double forestay, that is likely the role of the 155. if he has a bridle on his backstay, would recommend changing to two separate backstays with independent chainplates. smashing into a following sea puts tremendous force on the backstay. we broke two masts that way. ride em cowboy!
__________________

__________________
reed1v is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
sail, wind

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:51.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.