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Old 12-01-2010, 09:09   #1
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Taking a Cat to a Mooring

In other threads I've followed the bridle length discussions for anchoring. Good info. My question arises from one of the postings that says
"... the shorter the legs the greater the between-hull compression."

So - if I pick up a mooring, I want to keep the hulls from drifting up and banging into the mooring buoy. That means I shorten the bridle legs to just under the length between the hulls.

I have 2 attachment options: 1) to the hard eyes on the very point of the bows about 3ft above the waterline (I use these for my anchor bridle);
or
2) run the bridle legs up through a chock on each side of the crossbeam and then to the FWD mooring cleats. This allows easy adjustment of each leg.

I had planned to use method #2. I don't like the angle of pull from the hard eyes (option 1) on a shorter bridle (closer to 90 degrees the shorter the bridle leg).

How big a deal is this cross-hull compression factor anyway? IMO it can't be that big if a deal in anything except tropical storm conditions....?

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Old 12-01-2010, 09:32   #2
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I think it's less about the cross hull compression-- that is something the boat can easily handle since it handles much bigger loads from the headstay. For me, the issue is the increased loading on the bridle legs themselves! Too small a line and/or chafe issues when the loads are bigger are where I expect to see the trouble. In practice, if the legs are slightly shorter than the width between attachment points, you have essentially an equilateral (almost) triangle which doesn't have terrible loads. It's when you have significantly shorter bridle legs that the loads see the undesirable increase on the legs AND attachment points.
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Old 12-01-2010, 11:09   #3
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Have you considered tying the bridle together with a bit of rubber bungy?
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Old 12-01-2010, 17:17   #4
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Have you considered tying the bridle together with a bit of rubber bungy?
Hmm.... can't picture how that would work..... or how that could prevent the hulls from riding up and hitting it. Can you elaborate?
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Old 12-01-2010, 17:30   #5
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Hi Mark
Perhaps I was being presumptuous, I assumed that this problem would only occurred in no wind conditions / no current situations with the boat drifting around the mooring and your bridle slapping the hulls. Once there's any current or wind, the bridle will be stretched out.

My idea was to tie the two lines of the bridle together with some bungy cord - in effect shortening the bridle to the point where it wont bother you.

And then if the wind should pick up, the bungy will just let go from the strain and your bridle will proudly resume its former length... or words to that effect

Or have got the wrong end of the pineapple as usual?

ps.. back in bradenton until 24th before another 6 weeks in the salt mines.
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Old 12-01-2010, 18:00   #6
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Taking a cat to a mooring:
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Old 12-01-2010, 18:14   #7
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Bridle Mooring does work

Hi Mark
Have moored our 42ft cat this way for the last 7 years. The "mooring" bridle different to your anchoring bridle. Mooring bridle is short enough to keep the mooring buoy from bashing into the hulls. We run the lines through the forward fairleads and back to the forward cleat. We have the main line still coming up to the end of the anchor chains runway. So we have three line coming from our mooring. Its a little difficult to describe but it does work well. Good Luck sorting yours out

ciao

Kaz
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Old 13-01-2010, 06:26   #8
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Quote:
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Taking a cat to a mooring:
I LOVE it....!!
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Old 13-01-2010, 06:29   #9
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Hi Mark
Have moored our 42ft cat this way for the last 7 years. The "mooring" bridle different to your anchoring bridle. Mooring bridle is short enough to keep the mooring buoy from bashing into the hulls. We run the lines through the forward fairleads and back to the forward cleat. We have the main line still coming up to the end of the anchor chains runway. So we have three line coming from our mooring. Its a little difficult to describe but it does work well. Good Luck sorting yours out

ciao

Kaz
Thanks Kaz. I've made up a 2-legged bridle but the idea of adding a 3rd leg straight back to a centerline cleat I have is interesting.

The Admiral says I tend to over-think things.... huh? what could she mean?.... If I didn't think about this stuff..... aaaahhhh
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Old 13-01-2010, 06:32   #10
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Originally Posted by neelie View Post
Hi Mark
Perhaps I was being presumptuous, I assumed that this problem would only occurred in no wind conditions / no current situations with the boat drifting around the mooring and your bridle slapping the hulls. Once there's any current or wind, the bridle will be stretched out.....
Ah gotcha. I'd not considered that but was concerned about keeping the hulls from banging into the buoy.
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Old 13-01-2010, 18:15   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markpj23 View Post
My question arises from one of the postings that says
"... the shorter the legs the greater the between-hull compression."

I have 2 attachment options:
2) run the bridle legs up through a chock on each side of the crossbeam and then to the FWD mooring cleats. This allows easy adjustment of each leg.

How big a deal is this cross-hull compression factor anyway? IMO it can't be that big if a deal in anything except tropical storm conditions....?

Hi Mark,

NO big deal using your 2nd option "a chock on each side of the crossbeam" Without a sketch or photo, the cross beam
itself takes care of any compression.
Mine has pad-eyes welded on to a reinforced section of the beam very close to the hull. The mooring bridle is attached to these. The length of each side of the bridle ensures that the mooring float ball does not touch the hull.

TIP
In addition to a normal length boathook - I found a disused windsurfer mast to which I added a GRP boathook end, This is ideal when shorthanded to pick up lines etc.
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Old 14-01-2010, 00:11   #12
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Taking a cat to a mooring:
more like what i envisioned lol....gorgeous kat, btw........LOL
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