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Old 14-05-2007, 07:57   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schoonerdog
As an FYI, if you think you might need hurricane haulout, arrange for it ahead of time (like now).
Right... which is why I mentioned doing what you posted as an alternative to a haul out.
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Old 14-05-2007, 08:06   #32
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If haulout isn't an option (it is the best one), what about the helix anchors as a storm mooring? We've been talking about pennants, but what if your storm anchor drags all over the place? I'm looking at securing a 44-foot sloop with 14-ton displacement. Any thoughts on how to spec the helix anchor to storm loads?
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Old 14-05-2007, 08:36   #33
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The Great Pennant Race Debate!!

This site had some pretty good points.

www.inamarmarine.com/pdf/Moorings.pdf
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Old 14-05-2007, 08:38   #34
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I think the helix would be a great mooring, but I think you need some serious equipment and scuba divers to put it in? Also, it would then be a permanent private mooring in a navigable waterway? What would be the legal requirements for that?
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Old 14-05-2007, 09:35   #35
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I dive with a gang every week, so that part's not a problem for me. They are removable, as well, much more so than the engine blocks and concrete so many people seem to use. As to the legalities, I don't know.
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Old 14-05-2007, 10:27   #36
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Where have you found "marine" grade helix anchors available? I've only seen ones for use with utility poles & such, didn't think they'd take submersion very well for very long. Or, marine ones that were only sold as installed systems by vendors.
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Old 14-05-2007, 12:54   #37
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I read an insurance aftermath report done after the 2004 hurricanes which devasted parts of Florida, During hurricane Francis and Hurricane Jeanne not one boat anchored at ground zero in a hurricane in the Florida ICW survived without damage. Either anchors pulled out or the rodes parted. The rodes parted not only because of the immense force of the winds, but because of wind driven waves as well. The anchors pulled out because of the 180 degree wind shift of hurricane force winds, and failed to reset properly, not because they were bad anchors. All types of anchors failed.


As a result of this report the State of Florida has printed a new hurricane prepardness brochure for boater which they distribute free of charge. In this brochure, they recommend finding a canal to run your boat into and tying it to shore, much as Schoonerdog described.

Here in Central Florida where we receive 'glancing blows', we are ordered to evacuate our marina. We anchor in The ICW on the eastern shore to reduce fetch (smaller wind driven waves). I use a 3 anchor set in a 120 degree pattern with 3/4 inch 3 strand securing the anchors to a central point by shackle and then from that point onto my bowcleats, and then run to my cockpit winches. We have tried many types of chafe protection. What seems to work best is "fire hose" material with the neopreme removed or plain old blue jean material, ripped to length and attached to the boat or sewn directly onto the rode at the cleat. It's important that the chafe protection breathes and allows water in to cool the lines, if not, they melt.

By far, the most common type of damage isn't by our method of preparing for the storm. Invariably, it's someone elses boat which breaks loose and comes careening thru an anchorage, slamming into boats. One of my friends lost his beautiful Down Easter that way.

Unfortunately, I have a nice collection of photos of hurricane damaged boats from recent storms. I force myself to look at them when it's time to by new 3/4 inch line. (sigh)

Rick in Florida
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Old 14-05-2007, 14:34   #38
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The anchors Royce Randlett uses (he's apparently the guru of using the helix for moorings) are made by AB Chance, the same guys who make the ones for aquaculture applications. They are galvanized, so don't know how many years they would be good for. In applications, you sink the things all the way under the sand/mud/marl, so they wouldn't rust as badly because they would be under earth. Still, that would be, long-term, an issue, I guess. If you google it, there are a lot of hits.
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Old 14-05-2007, 14:41   #39
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Rickm,
I personally know of several boats in the ICW (just outside of it, technically) that survived the hurricanes down here in Palm Beach. I also know that Raiatea had a cyclone come through years ago and take out almost 100% of the boats up on the hard. We had three boats knocked down in a yard here a couple of weeks ago during a bad squall (microburst, I guess). If it's a cat 3 or better, all bets are off. We just need a fighting chance. Running up into a canal and tying off to multiple points in the old spider web configuration wouldn't work for me down here. There are too many boats, and not enough canals to get into within a reasonable amount of time.
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