Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 30-06-2013, 19:01   #16
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by conachair View Post
In an "ordinary" squall offshore in the tropics a common tactic is to get the shampoo out and hope it keeps raining long enough for a good rinse.
Amen. A squall, by definition, is localized. FORGET THE HOLLYWOOD VERSION!

Squalls can be your friends. Offshore racers often head into them to get the maximum lift possible. Some cruisers use them as a moment to replenish water and/or to clean off the salt.

My squall strategy is threefold: (1) reef down or at least dowse the spinnaker; (2) make sure that the boat is ready for lightning, which means the handheld GPS and VHF is in the microwave (which acts as our Faraday cage); (3) grab the Dr. Bronners.
__________________

__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 19:23   #17
cruiser

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tampa Bay area
Boat: Hunter 31'
Posts: 5,731
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
IMO, what you need to do is find a like-minded crew, and go out there when it's blowing 20, and practice the things you've read about. For example, at the instigation of the skipper, we went out on stormy winter weekends to practice, and learn stuff like the answer to the question, "why won't she heave to under the storm jib?" [because the sheet lead was in the wrong place]

The simple fact is that while reading about it is likely to allow you to visualize the tactics, actually doing them and experiencing them in conjunction with your vessel is what you will learn from.

Ann

I guess that is true, but I would urge people to read, and to think about what the authors say.

I actually used what I had read in SAILING FOR DUMMIES when caught in wind and seas too strong for my little boat. It wasn't as bad as a storm, but *that* experience will undoubtedly help me some time when things are worse. Hopefully I can gradually build on those experiences and not suddenly find my tender boat dealing with 80k gusts. But you never know.

I absolutely agree with going out when the wind is "only" at 20. Put a reef in and discover just how much it helps. Then practice putting in reefs. While you'll have help at first, make sure you can do it yoursef, because there's always the chance that when that first blast hits, the person with you will sprain an ankle or something, and you'll have to be able to do it yoursef.

Unfortunately one of the realities about rough weather is that you aren't guaranteed that nothing will break and that all crew will function well for the duration of the storm.
__________________

__________________
Rakuflames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 20:06   #18
Registered User
 
CapnBrown's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Clearwater, FL
Boat: Ed Hostman Tristar 38 Trimaran
Posts: 50
Re: Squall strategy?

Funny I reluctantly dropped a post I was going to put out on this thread recommending to seek out some squalls provided you live in an area that regularly has them. I thought some people may have an issue with recommending you head out into them as there is a risk of harm and or damage. Since I'm not alone in the mindset I'll add the conditions my post had which is to make sure your rigging, and boat in general, is in great shape because it's going to get pounded on. Then make sure you leave a float plan with someone that you can check in with who won't hesitate to contact emergency personnel if you don't return. Make sure you batten down the hatches just in case and be dressed to be wet. If you want to know what response you should give to a "white squall" (an unexpected hit from excessive winds like a squall) leave your sails full until the wind lays you down. With the boat laying on her side because you are totally over powered either head down or head up to manage your sails. Again, down wind and using the main to blanket your jib will allow you to furl it and it won't be so hectic as it would heading up. Heading up you can bring down both sails on that tack but if you have too much pressure on the jib it might not furl or might damage the furler or furling line using a winch. Then you might end up having to go up on deck to bring the sail down. Very hazardous in those conditions and with a jib battering you as you head up. I'm just following my reasoning for choosing to head down if hit out of the blue.

If you reduce sail before the squall hits you really are practicing on how to handle squalls/storms. If you wanted to handle this particular kind of squall you have to wait until you get hit as if it were unexpected. If you want to really be prepared have someone create an imaginary lee shore on the map/gpsmap that you are not allowed to pass and position yourself in front of the line when the squall hits. Again, you might have problems with the jib and the net result may cause damage. But you'll be much better prepared for the real thing if you can practice the techniques.

As mentioned having someone with experience in this area and have them let you manage the boat while they stand by to make sure a bad decision isn't made is priceless. And if your boat isn't up to the challenge there's always charter... JUST KIDDING! I could hear the cussing already...
__________________
CapnBrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 20:18   #19
cruiser

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tampa Bay area
Boat: Hunter 31'
Posts: 5,731
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnBrown View Post
Funny I reluctantly dropped a post I was going to put out on this thread recommending to seek out some squalls provided you live in an area that regularly has them. I thought some people may have an issue with recommending you head out into them as there is a risk of harm and or damage. Since I'm not alone in the mindset I'll add the conditions my post had which is to make sure your rigging, and boat in general, is in great shape because it's going to get pounded on. Then make sure you leave a float plan with someone that you can check in with who won't hesitate to contact emergency personnel if you don't return. Make sure you batten down the hatches just in case and be dressed to be wet. If you want to know what response you should give to a "white squall" (an unexpected hit from excessive winds like a squall) leave your sails full until the wind lays you down. With the boat laying on her side because you are totally over powered either head down or head up to manage your sails. Again, down wind and using the main to blanket your jib will allow you to furl it and it won't be so hectic as it would heading up. Heading up you can bring down both sails on that tack but if you have too much pressure on the jib it might not furl or might damage the furler or furling line using a winch. Then you might end up having to go up on deck to bring the sail down. Very hazardous in those conditions and with a jib battering you as you head up. I'm just following my reasoning for choosing to head down if hit out of the blue.

If you reduce sail before the squall hits you really are practicing on how to handle squalls/storms. If you wanted to handle this particular kind of squall you have to wait until you get hit as if it were unexpected. If you want to really be prepared have someone create an imaginary lee shore on the map/gpsmap that you are not allowed to pass and position yourself in front of the line when the squall hits. Again, you might have problems with the jib and the net result may cause damage. But you'll be much better prepared for the real thing if you can practice the techniques.

As mentioned having someone with experience in this area and have them let you manage the boat while they stand by to make sure a bad decision isn't made is priceless. And if your boat isn't up to the challenge there's always charter... JUST KIDDING! I could hear the cussing already...

If you pay attention to the weather you can do this with low likelihood of getting caught in a really rough storm.

I would also recommend going out in gradually higher and higher seas if you can -- and assuming your boat is up to it.

But I would urge you to read everything you can get your hands on, even if you don't understand it all. People can tell you important things like getting into deep enough water that the bottom doesn't make the sea more rough and confused than it needs to be under the circumstances.
__________________
Rakuflames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 21:03   #20
Registered User
 
Blue Crab's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hurricane Highway
Boat: Cal 29
Posts: 3,882
pirate Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bash View Post
Amen. A squall, by definition, is localized. FORGET THE HOLLYWOOD VERSION!

Squalls can be your friends. Offshore racers often head into them to get the maximum lift possible. Some cruisers use them as a moment to replenish water and/or to clean off the salt.

My squall strategy is threefold: (1) reef down or at least dowse the spinnaker; (2) make sure that the boat is ready for lightning, which means the handheld GPS and VHF is in the microwave (which acts as our Faraday cage); (3) grab the Dr. Bronners.

Once, after a squally shower, and desperate for new reading matter, I read the entire label on the Dr. Bronners container. It was either that or Chapman's. Come on!
__________________
Blue Crab is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 21:14   #21
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Re: Squall strategy?

40 knots? On a beat I probably would have hove to a few knots ago. Down wind I'd be getting a little punchy because running too fast and losing control is easy. If you decide to turn it around or gybe it can become a real fiasco. Slowly trim in, heave to once it steadies above 40 knots.

If it keeps building it's time to dust off 400' of three strand and toss the para anchor overboard. Hoping I never have to do that, knock on teak.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 23:05   #22
Registered User
 
Tomm0's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Melbourne, australia
Boat: Joubert Koala 24
Posts: 114
Re: Squall strategy?

As an ex-submariner, I can tell you that at about 40m there is hardly any movement, even during a squall. Probably not your first option though.
__________________
Tomm0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-06-2013, 23:57   #23
Senior Cruiser
 
rebel heart's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 6,190
Images: 3
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomm0 View Post
As an ex-submariner, I can tell you that at about 40m there is hardly any movement, even during a squall. Probably not your first option though.
What boat were you on?

I was on the USS Toledo, SSN 769.
__________________
rebel heart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 00:41   #24
Moderator
 
carstenb's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2012
Location: Copenhagen
Boat: Jeanneau Sun Fast 40.3
Posts: 4,936
Images: 1
Re: Squall strategy?

The only way to learn heavy weather sailing is to practice it. We go out in Gale force on occasion to try out different strategies.

Peter Bruce's "Heavy Weather Sailing" is a classic text. SEveral of the threads on this site deal exclusively with heavy weather and are well worth reading. So are Evans Starzingers opinions (bethandevans.com), He recently published one article on this site.
__________________
I spent most of my money on Booze, Broads and Boats. The rest I wasted - Elmore Leonard
carstenb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 01:06   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Probably in an anchorage or a boatyard..
Boat: Ebbtide 33' steel cutter
Posts: 3,537
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bash View Post

My squall strategy is threefold: (1) reef down or at least dowse the spinnaker; (2) make sure that the boat is ready for lightning, which means the handheld GPS and VHF is in the microwave (which acts as our Faraday cage); (3) grab the Dr. Bronners.
(4) a bucket under the gooseneck - another days drinking water
__________________
conachair is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 02:02   #26
Senior Cruiser
 
Talbot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Brighton, UK
Boat: Privilege 37
Posts: 3,579
Images: 32
Re: Squall strategy?

It is not many decades ago that a blue water cruiser would head towards a squall on the chance of getting fresh water.

The new CW radar are nowhere near as useful in detecting squalls, as they are designed to be able to look through them, but on a small boat, actualling tracking the squalls may well be a desireable strategy.

Reading heavy weather sailing is a useful task in its own right, but it is difficult to work out a strategy for your specific boat without getting out in the weather and trying it yourself.
__________________
"Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors - and miss."
Robert A Heinlein
Talbot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 17:42   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Hudson Valley N.Y.
Boat: contessa 32
Posts: 826
Re: Squall strategy?

Snore ;No need not be confused it must be me,I didn't realize that you can do 20 kts downwind on your Tartan sled of 33 feet and that you consider this a viable option for other cruising mom and pop cruisers to deal with a "significant blow".

Bash is of course correct that a squall is more local but that hardly qualifies as "significant" in terms of duration or sea state.

O.K. I'll admit it : I'm in a snarky mood... didn't mean to spoil your fun....Sorry.
__________________
mrohr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 18:03   #28
Registered User
 
Snore's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: St Petersburg
Boat: Tartan 33
Posts: 1,878
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrohr View Post

O.K. I'll admit it : I'm in a snarky mood... didn't mean to spoil your fun....Sorry.

No worries, grew up in the Bronx and have thick skin.

Cheers
__________________
"Whenever...it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off- then, I account it high time to get to sea..." Ishmael
Snore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 18:52   #29
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Crab View Post
Once, after a squally shower, and desperate for new reading matter, I read the entire label on the Dr. Bronners container. It was either that or Chapman's. Come on!
The Doctor changed the label recently, upgrading to fair trade/organic rhetoric. Bottom line is that you're going to have to read the whole thing over now.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 19:10   #30
Registered User
 
Blue Crab's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Hurricane Highway
Boat: Cal 29
Posts: 3,882
Re: Squall strategy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bash View Post
The Doctor changed the label recently, upgrading to fair trade/organic rhetoric. Bottom line is that you're going to have to read the whole thing over now.

Ha! Maybe I'll just read the bottom line.
__________________

__________________
Blue Crab is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thoughts on Deck Strategy ainadude Monohull Sailboats 25 15-08-2013 21:00
Gunkholers Storm Strategy Hudson Force Anchoring & Mooring 6 15-06-2013 05:55
Squall Detection, Pulse Radar vs Broadband? mikereed100 Marine Electronics 24 17-03-2012 20:11
Boston Whaler Squall windebank Construction, Maintenance & Refit 2 17-02-2012 11:30
The Business Case for Next-Generation Chartplotting hyman Navigation 17 24-11-2011 23:34



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:20.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.