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Old 10-06-2015, 09:03   #16
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

Its all horsh**t. You can't fight deep long sleep, only delay it with short naps. Your body and mind will give away sooner or later, or else you will be dead. All these stories and methods you read are nothing but testonic bravuras.
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:07   #17
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
I

I think if you look up Solar Impulse there may be something interesting to solo sailors there right now - their trans-Pacific is supposed to take at least 96 hours of solo flight. Sure they have done plenty of related research and preparation.
I read an article about that and the pilot was planning to take 20 minute sleeps.

I hope his AP works well as he'll be in more **** than a solo sailor if something goes wrong


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Old 10-06-2015, 09:11   #18
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

I use the "Falling off the stool" method, I sit on a hard wooden stool and when I fall off of it, I wake up and check the horizon.
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:27   #19
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by tenchiki View Post
The book is also available as a free PDF from the SFBay Single Handed Sailors website: Resources | Singlehanded Sailing Society
That link above is to an earlier free edition of the book, that was published a few years ago.

The latest edition, came out in October 2014, (now on Amazon and available for kindle download). The 2014 edition contains new material, more recent material, according to the author.

Here is a clip/quote describing the new content in the 2014 edition. I think this new content sounds interesting to me.
The new edition has several new chapters and major additions, including:
 Extended interviews with Craig Horsfield (Mini 6.50), Joe Harris (Class 40) and Ryan Breymaier (IMOCA 60) about sailing their performance racers.
 A whole chapter on keels, keeping the boat upright and reducing leeway, including water ballast, canting keels, dagger boards and the DSS wing.
 A big section and lessons from Jessica Watson’s collision with a freighter, including the report from The Australian Transportation Safety Bureau.
 A long interview and photos from Ruben Gabriel on every singlehander’s dream; what it’s like to break a mast and repair it – half way to Hawaii.
Dealing with hull punctures in real life (not the movie version).
A long talk with 3-time circumnavigator Jeanne Socrates on living aboard.
Discussions with singlehanders about their real life medical emergencies.
 Dan Alonso’s story of rescuing another singlehander in horrible weather.
 The good way and not-so-good way to hit a rock, from my own experience.
____________

I read the free first edition, I still recommend folks get the latest 2014 edition, which is also available as a instant download kindle version (which can be read on any tablet or laptop with the kindle free app). Yes, there is a small cost ($13) for the latest edition, but I think the total content makes it a very good value, loaded with practical advice on the subject.

I think anyone who intends to do any single handing, would benefit from reading it, including people who race or cruise or even couples who may be double handing.

As a sailor, I want to again say a "Big Thanks" to Andrew for giving away 25,000 free copies to the sailing community. I think THAT was admirable. I am one of many sailors who have learned from it. I don't mind spending $13 to get the latest edition (instantly) on my kindle.

Singlehanded Sailing: Thoughts, Tips, Techniques & Tactics: Andrew Evans: 9780071836531: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:46   #20
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

Thanks Tenchiki, got the download.
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Old 10-06-2015, 09:59   #21
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Mstrebe, displaying NUC lights might work for you but, strictly speaking the vessel isn't NUC when the skipper is taking a nap. The definition refers to exceptional circumstances, which might include loss of steering or engine etc

(f) The term "vessel not under command" means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to manoeuvre as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel
If you're not commanding your vessel, you owe it to other boats to say so. The definition of "exceptional circumstances" is vague and I include "solo sailor sleeping" to be an exceptional circumstance. If they meant "vessel is disabled", that's what the regs would say. They don't mean that. They mean any time you're not commanding the vessel.

If it bothers you, toss a line overboard, hoist your fishing lights, and then go to sleep. That way you're only to blame if you drift into someone who is NUC.

I guarantee you that you're better off legally displaying NUC lights when you're hove-to or adrift than not displaying them as well, irrespective of your reasons.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, but I will take it up with my Sea Lawyer the next time I see him.
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:06   #22
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by hoppy View Post
I've seen many threads where people recommend 20 minute sleeps or similar when on long solo passages and other recommendations, but what is the sleep reality for YOU when you are on long solo passages?

What is your desired routine and how long does it take you to get into the swing of it. Perhaps you are the type of person who falls asleep immediately normally, so 20 minute sleeps are easy for you. Or maybe you can't get into a routine of short sleeps until you are so tired?

What do you use to reliably wake yourself?
Where do you sleep? Cockpit, your berth or perhaps by the nav station?

Do you ever get to the point where you say "f.ck it" and take an extended sleep to get rid of exhaustion and if so, do you change the way you are sailing for the longer sleep?
Here's one of the most recent of the previous "many threads" on this subject :-)

Advice, How to Maintain Watch & Sail When Solo Thru 24 Hr's. (+) Time Periods ?
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:07   #23
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by hoppy View Post
I've seen many threads where people recommend 20 minute sleeps or similar when on long solo passages and other recommendations, but what is the sleep reality for YOU when you are on long solo passages?

What is your desired routine and how long does it take you to get into the swing of it. Perhaps you are the type of person who falls asleep immediately normally, so 20 minute sleeps are easy for you. Or maybe you can't get into a routine of short sleeps until you are so tired?

What do you use to reliably wake yourself?
Where do you sleep? Cockpit, your berth or perhaps by the nav station?

Do you ever get to the point where you say "f.ck it" and take an extended sleep to get rid of exhaustion and if so, do you change the way you are sailing for the longer sleep?
I deliberately sleep in the cockpit with my head against the Plotter/AIS and Radar alarms. I NEVER go to the cabin/ bunk to sleep. Use an egg timer set for 30 minutes at night. During the day catnap. Works ok for me. Fortunately I can sleep anywhere any time.
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:24   #24
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by mstrebe View Post
If you're not commanding your vessel, you owe it to other boats to say so. The definition of "exceptional circumstances" is vague and I include "solo sailor sleeping" to be an exceptional circumstance. If they meant "vessel is disabled", that's what the regs would say. They don't mean that. They mean any time you're not commanding the vessel.

If it bothers you, toss a line overboard, hoist your fishing lights, and then go to sleep. That way you're only to blame if you drift into someone who is NUC.

I guarantee you that you're better off legally displaying NUC lights when you're hove-to or adrift than not displaying them as well, irrespective of your reasons.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, but I will take it up with my Sea Lawyer the next time I see him.

Sound like a plan, maybe add a strobe light while you're at it
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:31   #25
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

I'm a wimp, 14 hour daytime passages are my limit. If I needed sleep, I'd probably just heave to for a 20 minute nap in the cockpit with the radar and AIS alarm turned on.
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:36   #26
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pirate Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

Quote:
Originally Posted by monte View Post
Sound like a plan, maybe add a strobe light while you're at it
If in the shipping lanes chose the favourable hove to tack to run with the lane..
Overtaking vessel is obliged to take all precautions.
Shove that in your pipe and smoke it..
Everything has a loophole.. switch off the legal? bullshit and switch on the grey matter..
That way no need for NUC lights..
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:37   #27
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

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Originally Posted by monte View Post
Sound like a plan, maybe add a strobe light while you're at it
No thanks, impossible to sleep with a strobe light going off.
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Old 10-06-2015, 10:48   #28
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

I really have only done one long singlehanded crossing, 72 days Osaka to Victoria in 2011.

I set a timer to wake every 90 minutes. On those occasions when I was hove-to I did not set the timer and just let myself sleep, though I surely slept through hours and hours of excellent sailing weather.
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Old 10-06-2015, 11:23   #29
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

Some of the sleep thing depends on where you are, & what vessel traffic is like. If traffic is light, & say you're out in the open ocean, out of the shipping lanes, then "proper" watch keeping is less of a priority, & you can grab some chunks of "extended" sleep. Say, a few hours at a time... often in a bunk, but near enough to your radar alarms & such.

In more travelled locales, sleep periods are shorter, & often in the cockpit. Assuming that you're not in the N. Atlantic in Winter.
One simple trick for this, is to make a hot water bottle or two to tuck into your foulies, just prior to going to sleep. So that the extra warmth helps you to get some shuteye. And when they get cold, so do you, causing you to wake.

Regardless, as has been said, it's something which requires a bit of training. Both sleeping in short stints, & adapting to sleeping on deck in your foulies.
Much of both can be learned by becoming part of the crew on a racing boat. Where you have to do these things in order to pull your own weight.
But by virtue of being on a crewed boat, you also get support in learning these skills. As there are folks to wake you. In addition to morale & emotional support for learning how to cope with these things. And a comraderie created by everyone dealing with the same hardships for "fun".

For example, on night watches, prior to me turning in, & leaving the next guy to handle things solo. I'll make him a big cup or thermos of tea, coffee, or hot chocolate. Such goes a long way to making his watch easier. Both in helping keep him warm & comforted via the beverage. And in knowing that other guys onboard really care about his welfare.
Such traits & habits tend to spread, & become mutual. Making for tight crews, & good morale.

Also, and this is key: Due to all of the sail changes & other evolutions which go on on a racer, you learn to sleep with an open ear. AKA being awake enough when sounds change in order to discern if you're needed on deck or not to assist with things. So that it becomes easy to either get up & help with things on deck, or quickly fall back to sleep, with little time or effort involved.
Deliveries are a good tool to use for this kind of training as well, especially short handed ones.

And for the hard core, you can seek out professionals who specialize in training folks for these kinds of things. Including doing sleep studies, where you're wired up to all kinds of monitoring etc.

On Ellen McArthur's record, solo circumnavigation on Castorama/B&Q, she was wired up to bio-telemetry gear for the whole trip. And they would suggest to her when it'd be smart for her to grab some down time, & when it was okay to stay awake in order to really push the boat.
Much of this information being based on lots of lab, sleep testing done on her for a good bit of time, & lots of sailing (while wired up), prior to doing the record run.

It's also fairly easy to put together some tests or yourself to carry out at various times (24/7), & sleep intervals on land, as well as @ sea (with crewed backup for the latter). In order to see how well you perform at various sleep intervals & sleep lengths, as well as at what times during the day & night.
Then you can use said information in order to create watch plans for when you're sailing. And if you've the energy, also noting how well the reality of such matches up with the testing, & modifying things accordingly. Including what works best to help you to get back on sked, when things get interrupted by weather, or other events beyond your control.


PS: The better physical & emotional condition you're in, the easier it is to both handle living & working on less sleep, & to bounce back from extended periods with none.
For example, if I'm in shape, then 2 - 2 1/2 days sans sleep isn't much of a trial, albeit, of course, the reverse is also true.
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Old 10-06-2015, 11:51   #30
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Re: Solo sailers and sleep reality

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Eisberg View Post
Here's one of the most recent of the previous "many threads" on this subject :-)

Advice, How to Maintain Watch & Sail When Solo Thru 24 Hr's. (+) Time Periods ?
Maybe people set out with good intentions to do the 20 minute thing, but by the end of their passage the reality was very different. I'm more interest in peoples post journey personal experiences rather than advice on how to do it.
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