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Old 07-05-2012, 16:23   #1
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Singlehanding

Can an Ingrid 38 Ketch be easily singlehanded? Can an INgrid 38 Cutter also be singlehanded?
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Old 07-05-2012, 16:31   #2
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Re: Singlehanding

You can learn to singlehand most anything with practice.

Some tips here.
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Old 07-05-2012, 17:00   #3
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Re: Singlehanding

I can single hand my Cabo 38. The only time I might need a hand is getting in and out of my slip. It depends on conditions. It does require that you think ahead and have a plan. It helps even more if you have a plan for when the first plan doesn't work.

Rich
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Old 07-05-2012, 17:08   #4
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Re: Singlehanding

I believe very much depends on:

- your skills and experience,
- boat layout,
- your physical strength,
- support devices (winches, etc..).

If the boats are the same design I think both ketch and cutter are manageable.

b.
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Old 07-05-2012, 18:36   #5
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Re: Singlehanding

I single my 40- but it is very demanding. You best be a good sailor with good judgement. Know when to turn around, though I still seem to get in trouble. I think it is more fun to do it with friends, IMHO.
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Old 07-05-2012, 18:54   #6
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Re: Singlehanding

Yes you can but!!!! Gettting in and out of the slip with a 28,000# boat with a long bowsprit wher there is any kind of wind and/or current can get very interesting. Once you are clear of the dock, it's not that big a deal to actually sail. Keeping watch, minding the helm, etc. is a real challenge especially if you sail in congested waters.

A self steering vane and/or an autopilot is almost a must have item. Amazing what the boat will do every time you leave the helm unattended to take care of something elsewhere without a vane. Personally, would buy a vane first and the boat second for single handing. An autopilot could be a challenge to mount with the tiller and outboard rudder. The Raymarine Grand Prix tiller pilot might be up to the task of steering such a heavy beast but then maybe not. You'd have to be very creative to rig a below decks A/P. Best bet might be to rig an autopilot to the windvane for those times you must steer by the compass.

I single handed our Westsail 32 with an Aries Vane and did just fine. Had very easy entry slips to get in and out of when at a marina. Sailing off the hook was no big deal. Actually sailing the boat was really quite easy with the vane. An Ingrid is just better sailing W32 with 6' more boat and 8,000# more displacement.
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Old 07-05-2012, 18:56   #7
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Re: Singlehanding

Quote:
Originally Posted by s/v Beth View Post
I single my 40- but it is very demanding. You best be a good sailor with good judgement. Know when to turn around, though I still seem to get in trouble. I think it is more fun to do it with friends, IMHO.

Speaking as a relatively new sailor, I really enjoy sailing with others, and sailing on otheres' boats, but I also value sailing the boat by myself. yesterday i sailed the boat out the Manatee River, across Tampa Bay, up the Sunshine Skyway Passage ("The Ditch," and even through two bridges. I can feel my skills grow on these occasions. I sailed through the bridges because the headsail was jammed. Then I had to figure out how to drop the anchor on a boat that REALLY wanted to keep moving. Anchored, I was able to solve the headsail problem (I stupidly left a loose line on deck, and when I tried to pull the headsail in, it fouled the continuous furling line). My fault, my bad, but also my opportunity to learn.

If someone else had been on the boat, they probably would have stowed the line properly and both the bad and the good of this (and I learned from both) would not have happened.

The trick is to do it in small increments, and also on a boat that side, to make sure it is truly rigged for single-handing. Don't take it out when storms are forecast without help. You may have to do that by yourself some day, but it would best if that day weren't the first time you've taken it through a storm.

I know lots of people have done at least most of what I did yesterday, but the day had several big firsts for me. I learned from it.
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Old 07-05-2012, 19:41   #8
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Since many of my day trips are last minute, I've single handed my Tartan 33 about 1/2 the time I've taken her out in the 2 months we've been together.

IMHO, the T-33 in a tight (+/- 50') canal is tough to get to turn 180 degrees for a side docking if there is a 10 kt wind blowing down the canal out of the east. When it is kicking, I get the bow to the dock, scurry forward, tie the bow line and let the wind get her closer. As the wind brings her in, I use the boat hook to grab the aft spring line and then walk the line aft.

Add another 5 feet of length, a bow sprit, significantly more displacement and there is sound justification for a bow thruster if you want to single hand it.

Bill
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Old 22-06-2012, 19:34   #9
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Re: Singlehanding

What sort of sailing?

Day sailing singlehanding is very different from single-handed passagemaking, for example.
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Old 22-06-2012, 19:54   #10
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Singlehand this 50 all over everywhere. No big deal yet. Rather exhausting at times. Bigger is better because of stability. Lighter is better because handling everything is easier.
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Old 22-06-2012, 20:17   #11
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Re: Singlehanding

Ahoy Chebba,
I don't see a lot of full keel sailors responding to you. I've sailed with some of my friends who have full keeled boats like yours, and yes, they can be sailed just like a ship, just get her balanced, and tend to each thing in turn, don't let it overwhelm you.
The key is sail balance, so upwind you want to flatten the jib and let out the main. Just enough to reduce weather helm and get her stabilized to sail the course or enable the autopilot to handle it. Off the wind, kill the main. If you read Webb Chiles, you find out how to set up a simple sheet to tiller self steering with the headsail.
An auto pilot is good downwind because it won't react to the changes of little gusts due to aparent wind.
I find the problem of singlehanding is critical when getting out of the harbor, or comeing in, once you are on your way, it is a lot easier.
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Old 22-06-2012, 20:55   #12
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Re: Singlehanding

Ive sailed many miles single handed, mostly on our 42 ft colvin, but I cheat, I use the iron horse to get in and out of the harbors unless sailing conditions are perfect !! I like to keep things simple, reef early,Take no chances at night, and make sure your engine and engine battery are in GOOD shape, Single handing is started at the dock getting things ready for being single handed!! just think it out in advance, and look at cruiseing boats that have a man and women as crew, look at their winchs and how their lines are led back to the cockpit, things like that will help ya get ready to get out there alone!! Just my 2 cents
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Old 23-06-2012, 17:22   #13
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Re: Singlehanding

Singlehanding on an Ingrid is absolutely learnable, doable and safe. 95% or more of all my sailing is solo (Pacific Seacraft 37).

As noted, slip entry can be nerve-racking. Practice with a friend on the dock.
Sailing--start with light winds, chop and swell. Gain your confidence & develop your skills by sailing often!
Practice reefing & heaving-to.
Sail in stronger winds and longer sails.
Go sailing often!
There should just enough mistakes to remember, learn and tell stories later-on.

I still remember my first sail (Catalina 34) to Catalina Island---30 miles/under 12 knots and felt like a hero. Of course, scary getting the mooring the first time (I asked for help).
I still get that feeling still with each adventure/destination.
I still plan ahead, reef early/often.

Single handing is way good. Just takes practice and planning
Go for it. Sail often. Enjoy.

Yes, you can singlehand an Ingrid.
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Old 23-06-2012, 17:52   #14
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Re: Singlehanding

I suggest an earlier thread that discussed handling an ingrid. They apperently have special issues. I would go with someone else for a while. I would further caution those that extrapolate their experience with their boat to an Ingrid or similar boat. My Valiant just is not the same. I just learned this last week, so sorry for the late post.
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